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Temple model begins its journey to Yeshiva University Museum for Modeling the Synagogue:  From Dura to Touro.

Temple model begins its journey to Yeshiva University Museum for Modeling the Synagogue:  From Dura to Touro.

Keep checking off the days on your calendar; summer is almost gone.  This calendar page showing Ismar David’s distinctive calligraphy was donated to Yeshiva University Museum by Helen Brandshaft. 

Keep checking off the days on your calendar; summer is almost gone.  This calendar page showing Ismar David’s distinctive calligraphy was donated to Yeshiva University Museum by Helen Brandshaft. 

Laura Murlender, a Buenos Aires native, was abducted by Argentina’s military regime when she was nineteen.  From 1976 to 1983, Argentina was under military rule and Jews were one group of people that were targeted for kidnappings and torture.  After her accidental release from solitary confinement, Murlender left Argentina for Tel Aviv.  She was accepted to the Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem where she sought unity and stability through her work.  Through her various pieces and series since 1982, Murlender has been able to depict her move past the barriers she once encountered due to her Jewish identity and enable her overcome her history.  This painting, done in 2007, was shown in YU Museum’s 2007 show, “From Darkness to Light: The paintings of Laura Murlender A “Disappeared” who survived!”  Her work allows Murlender to transition from the darkness that she has experienced to light and to represent and accept her identity and history.  

Time Line I, Laura Murlender (b. 1957), Mixed media, Israel, 2007, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2007.074), Gift of the artist

Laura Murlender, a Buenos Aires native, was abducted by Argentina’s military regime when she was nineteen.  From 1976 to 1983, Argentina was under military rule and Jews were one group of people that were targeted for kidnappings and torture.  After her accidental release from solitary confinement, Murlender left Argentina for Tel Aviv.  She was accepted to the Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem where she sought unity and stability through her work.  Through her various pieces and series since 1982, Murlender has been able to depict her move past the barriers she once encountered due to her Jewish identity and enable her overcome her history.  This painting, done in 2007, was shown in YU Museum’s 2007 show, “From Darkness to Light: The paintings of Laura Murlender A “Disappeared” who survived!”  Her work allows Murlender to transition from the darkness that she has experienced to light and to represent and accept her identity and history.  

Time Line I, Laura Murlender (b. 1957), Mixed media, Israel, 2007, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2007.074), Gift of the artist

Echoes of the Borscht Belt:  Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld opens this Sunday, August 3rd, in Yeshiva University Museum’s Selz Gallery.

In the mid-1970s, Sarah Safford, a dancer from New York was driving in Mahopac in Upstate New York when she came upon an abandoned truck in the middle of a field.  In the truck was a trove of eccentric clothes that Safford recognized as stage costumes.  Safford’s theater-knowledgeable mother identified the clothes’ importance and recognized them as belonging to Molly Picon, the Yiddish theater star.  Safford and her mother contacted Picon who said that, as a result of her grief over the death of her husband, had left many mementos and souvenirs in the house that she had shared with him in Mahopac.  Picon also encouraged Safford to keep the clothes and use them for shows.  Safford did later use the clothes in a show inspired by her find called Molly Picon is Alive and Well and Living in Brooklyn.  

In the mid-1970s, Sarah Safford, a dancer from New York was driving in Mahopac in Upstate New York when she came upon an abandoned truck in the middle of a field.  In the truck was a trove of eccentric clothes that Safford recognized as stage costumes.  Safford’s theater-knowledgeable mother identified the clothes’ importance and recognized them as belonging to Molly Picon, the Yiddish theater star.  Safford and her mother contacted Picon who said that, as a result of her grief over the death of her husband, had left many mementos and souvenirs in the house that she had shared with him in Mahopac.  Picon also encouraged Safford to keep the clothes and use them for shows.  Safford did later use the clothes in a show inspired by her find called Molly Picon is Alive and Well and Living in Brooklyn.  

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

Congratulations recent graduates of 2014!

This portrait of Augusta Victoria Klein was taken in honor of her graduation, ca. 1925. The photograph, from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, was a gift of Sylvia Axelrod Herskowitz. 

Congratulations recent graduates of 2014!

This portrait of Augusta Victoria Klein was taken in honor of her graduation, ca. 1925. The photograph, from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, was a gift of Sylvia Axelrod Herskowitz. 

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        
  

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        

  

Ina Golub donated her archive to Yeshiva University Museum and it is now searchable on line! This collection includes maquettes, presentations, documents, photographs, and the banner from her 1996 retrospective exhibition at the Museum.

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

Temple model begins its journey to Yeshiva University Museum for Modeling the Synagogue:  From Dura to Touro.

Temple model begins its journey to Yeshiva University Museum for Modeling the Synagogue:  From Dura to Touro.

Keep checking off the days on your calendar; summer is almost gone.  This calendar page showing Ismar David’s distinctive calligraphy was donated to Yeshiva University Museum by Helen Brandshaft. 

Keep checking off the days on your calendar; summer is almost gone.  This calendar page showing Ismar David’s distinctive calligraphy was donated to Yeshiva University Museum by Helen Brandshaft. 

Laura Murlender, a Buenos Aires native, was abducted by Argentina’s military regime when she was nineteen.  From 1976 to 1983, Argentina was under military rule and Jews were one group of people that were targeted for kidnappings and torture.  After her accidental release from solitary confinement, Murlender left Argentina for Tel Aviv.  She was accepted to the Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem where she sought unity and stability through her work.  Through her various pieces and series since 1982, Murlender has been able to depict her move past the barriers she once encountered due to her Jewish identity and enable her overcome her history.  This painting, done in 2007, was shown in YU Museum’s 2007 show, “From Darkness to Light: The paintings of Laura Murlender A “Disappeared” who survived!”  Her work allows Murlender to transition from the darkness that she has experienced to light and to represent and accept her identity and history.  

Time Line I, Laura Murlender (b. 1957), Mixed media, Israel, 2007, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2007.074), Gift of the artist

Laura Murlender, a Buenos Aires native, was abducted by Argentina’s military regime when she was nineteen.  From 1976 to 1983, Argentina was under military rule and Jews were one group of people that were targeted for kidnappings and torture.  After her accidental release from solitary confinement, Murlender left Argentina for Tel Aviv.  She was accepted to the Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem where she sought unity and stability through her work.  Through her various pieces and series since 1982, Murlender has been able to depict her move past the barriers she once encountered due to her Jewish identity and enable her overcome her history.  This painting, done in 2007, was shown in YU Museum’s 2007 show, “From Darkness to Light: The paintings of Laura Murlender A “Disappeared” who survived!”  Her work allows Murlender to transition from the darkness that she has experienced to light and to represent and accept her identity and history.  

Time Line I, Laura Murlender (b. 1957), Mixed media, Israel, 2007, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2007.074), Gift of the artist

Echoes of the Borscht Belt:  Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld opens this Sunday, August 3rd, in Yeshiva University Museum’s Selz Gallery.

In the mid-1970s, Sarah Safford, a dancer from New York was driving in Mahopac in Upstate New York when she came upon an abandoned truck in the middle of a field.  In the truck was a trove of eccentric clothes that Safford recognized as stage costumes.  Safford’s theater-knowledgeable mother identified the clothes’ importance and recognized them as belonging to Molly Picon, the Yiddish theater star.  Safford and her mother contacted Picon who said that, as a result of her grief over the death of her husband, had left many mementos and souvenirs in the house that she had shared with him in Mahopac.  Picon also encouraged Safford to keep the clothes and use them for shows.  Safford did later use the clothes in a show inspired by her find called Molly Picon is Alive and Well and Living in Brooklyn.  

In the mid-1970s, Sarah Safford, a dancer from New York was driving in Mahopac in Upstate New York when she came upon an abandoned truck in the middle of a field.  In the truck was a trove of eccentric clothes that Safford recognized as stage costumes.  Safford’s theater-knowledgeable mother identified the clothes’ importance and recognized them as belonging to Molly Picon, the Yiddish theater star.  Safford and her mother contacted Picon who said that, as a result of her grief over the death of her husband, had left many mementos and souvenirs in the house that she had shared with him in Mahopac.  Picon also encouraged Safford to keep the clothes and use them for shows.  Safford did later use the clothes in a show inspired by her find called Molly Picon is Alive and Well and Living in Brooklyn.  

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

Congratulations recent graduates of 2014!

This portrait of Augusta Victoria Klein was taken in honor of her graduation, ca. 1925. The photograph, from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, was a gift of Sylvia Axelrod Herskowitz. 

Congratulations recent graduates of 2014!

This portrait of Augusta Victoria Klein was taken in honor of her graduation, ca. 1925. The photograph, from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, was a gift of Sylvia Axelrod Herskowitz. 

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        
  

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        

  

Ina Golub donated her archive to Yeshiva University Museum and it is now searchable on line! This collection includes maquettes, presentations, documents, photographs, and the banner from her 1996 retrospective exhibition at the Museum.

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

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