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Congratulations recent graduates of 2014!

This portrait of Augusta Victoria Klein was taken in honor of her graduation, ca. 1925. The photograph, from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, was a gift of Sylvia Axelrod Herskowitz. 

Congratulations recent graduates of 2014!

This portrait of Augusta Victoria Klein was taken in honor of her graduation, ca. 1925. The photograph, from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, was a gift of Sylvia Axelrod Herskowitz. 

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        
  

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        

  

Ina Golub donated her archive to Yeshiva University Museum and it is now searchable on line! This collection includes maquettes, presentations, documents, photographs, and the banner from her 1996 retrospective exhibition at the Museum.

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

In the city this summer? These watercolor paintings by Albert Dov Sigal are from an archive of many similar, whimsical depictions of different cities, among them Paris, Rome, and Vienna.  Sigal captures some of the essential characteristics of NYC, namely endless construction and corner pizza stores.  

Laurence Goodstein and friends from Camp Oneida don’t look very cheerful in this ca. 1915 photograph, do they?  
Photograph from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Lerner

Laurence Goodstein and friends from Camp Oneida don’t look very cheerful in this ca. 1915 photograph, do they?  

Photograph from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Lerner

Zak Vreeland, Archivist at the Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation in New York City, recentle identified this bust in the collection of Yeshiva University Museum as Max Grant, leader of the Jewish community in Providence, Rhode Island.Portrait bust of Max GrantArtist:  Chaim Gross (1901-1991)BronzeNew York, 1970Collection of Yeshiva University MuseumGift from the Collection of Gloria and Henry I. Zeisel, Monsey, New York

Zak Vreeland, Archivist at the Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation in New York City, recentle identified this bust in the collection of Yeshiva University Museum as Max Grant, leader of the Jewish community in Providence, Rhode Island.

Portrait bust of Max Grant
Artist:  Chaim Gross (1901-1991)
Bronze
New York, 1970
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum
Gift from the Collection of Gloria and Henry I. Zeisel, Monsey, New York

Professor Steven Fine and his class examine a print by David Roberts showing the Roman destruction of Jerusalem from the collection of Yeshiva University Museum

Visit this sad reminder of the suffering victims of war at the New York Historical Society’s exhibition “I Live. Send Help.” 100 Years of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee on view through September 21, 2014Joint Distribution Committee poster:  Jewish war sufferersLithographArtist:  Lou MeyerPrinter:  Latham Litho & Printing Co.Brooklyn, ca. 1917Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, New York

Visit this sad reminder of the suffering victims of war at the New York Historical Society’s exhibition “I Live. Send Help.” 100 Years of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee on view through September 21, 2014

Joint Distribution Committee poster:  Jewish war sufferers
Lithograph
Artist:  Lou Meyer
Printer:  Latham Litho & Printing Co.
Brooklyn, ca. 1917
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, New York

Monument to A.D. Gordon, by Mimi WeinbergApril 9 to December 28, 2014
Aaron David Gordon (1856 - 1922), commonly known as A. D. Gordon, an early and influential Zionist, was one of the founders of Hapoel Hatzair (The Young Worker), a group active in Palestine in the first decades of the 20th century. This sculpture, created for the YU Museum Sculpture Garden, pays tribute to Gordon by merging motifs evoking the modern agricultural process and the language of ancient structures. Integrating shapes drawn from 20th-century farming equipment with designs based on biblical-era forms, the artist celebrates the longstanding tradition of physical labor within Israeli society.

Monument to A.D. Gordon, by Mimi Weinberg
April 9 to December 28, 2014

Aaron David Gordon (1856 - 1922), commonly known as A. D. Gordon, an early and influential Zionist, was one of the founders of Hapoel Hatzair (The Young Worker), a group active in Palestine in the first decades of the 20th century. This sculpture, created for the YU Museum Sculpture Garden, pays tribute to Gordon by merging motifs evoking the modern agricultural process and the language of ancient structures. Integrating shapes drawn from 20th-century farming equipment with designs based on biblical-era forms, the artist celebrates the longstanding tradition of physical labor within Israeli society.

Congratulations recent graduates of 2014!

This portrait of Augusta Victoria Klein was taken in honor of her graduation, ca. 1925. The photograph, from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, was a gift of Sylvia Axelrod Herskowitz. 

Congratulations recent graduates of 2014!

This portrait of Augusta Victoria Klein was taken in honor of her graduation, ca. 1925. The photograph, from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, was a gift of Sylvia Axelrod Herskowitz. 

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        
  

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        

  

Ina Golub donated her archive to Yeshiva University Museum and it is now searchable on line! This collection includes maquettes, presentations, documents, photographs, and the banner from her 1996 retrospective exhibition at the Museum.

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

In the city this summer? These watercolor paintings by Albert Dov Sigal are from an archive of many similar, whimsical depictions of different cities, among them Paris, Rome, and Vienna.  Sigal captures some of the essential characteristics of NYC, namely endless construction and corner pizza stores.  

Laurence Goodstein and friends from Camp Oneida don’t look very cheerful in this ca. 1915 photograph, do they?  
Photograph from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Lerner

Laurence Goodstein and friends from Camp Oneida don’t look very cheerful in this ca. 1915 photograph, do they?  

Photograph from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Lerner

Zak Vreeland, Archivist at the Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation in New York City, recentle identified this bust in the collection of Yeshiva University Museum as Max Grant, leader of the Jewish community in Providence, Rhode Island.Portrait bust of Max GrantArtist:  Chaim Gross (1901-1991)BronzeNew York, 1970Collection of Yeshiva University MuseumGift from the Collection of Gloria and Henry I. Zeisel, Monsey, New York

Zak Vreeland, Archivist at the Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation in New York City, recentle identified this bust in the collection of Yeshiva University Museum as Max Grant, leader of the Jewish community in Providence, Rhode Island.

Portrait bust of Max Grant
Artist:  Chaim Gross (1901-1991)
Bronze
New York, 1970
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum
Gift from the Collection of Gloria and Henry I. Zeisel, Monsey, New York

Professor Steven Fine and his class examine a print by David Roberts showing the Roman destruction of Jerusalem from the collection of Yeshiva University Museum

Visit this sad reminder of the suffering victims of war at the New York Historical Society’s exhibition “I Live. Send Help.” 100 Years of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee on view through September 21, 2014Joint Distribution Committee poster:  Jewish war sufferersLithographArtist:  Lou MeyerPrinter:  Latham Litho & Printing Co.Brooklyn, ca. 1917Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, New York

Visit this sad reminder of the suffering victims of war at the New York Historical Society’s exhibition “I Live. Send Help.” 100 Years of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee on view through September 21, 2014

Joint Distribution Committee poster:  Jewish war sufferers
Lithograph
Artist:  Lou Meyer
Printer:  Latham Litho & Printing Co.
Brooklyn, ca. 1917
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, New York

Monument to A.D. Gordon, by Mimi WeinbergApril 9 to December 28, 2014
Aaron David Gordon (1856 - 1922), commonly known as A. D. Gordon, an early and influential Zionist, was one of the founders of Hapoel Hatzair (The Young Worker), a group active in Palestine in the first decades of the 20th century. This sculpture, created for the YU Museum Sculpture Garden, pays tribute to Gordon by merging motifs evoking the modern agricultural process and the language of ancient structures. Integrating shapes drawn from 20th-century farming equipment with designs based on biblical-era forms, the artist celebrates the longstanding tradition of physical labor within Israeli society.

Monument to A.D. Gordon, by Mimi Weinberg
April 9 to December 28, 2014

Aaron David Gordon (1856 - 1922), commonly known as A. D. Gordon, an early and influential Zionist, was one of the founders of Hapoel Hatzair (The Young Worker), a group active in Palestine in the first decades of the 20th century. This sculpture, created for the YU Museum Sculpture Garden, pays tribute to Gordon by merging motifs evoking the modern agricultural process and the language of ancient structures. Integrating shapes drawn from 20th-century farming equipment with designs based on biblical-era forms, the artist celebrates the longstanding tradition of physical labor within Israeli society.

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YU Museum creates new ways to experience and interpret Jewish art and history. It is a source for new ideas and perspectives on historic events and cultural phenomena effecting everyone.

Visit YU Museum’s exhibitions and programs! They open the eyes of audiences to new perspectives on Jewish culture, historic events and cultural phenomena. They reveal the vitality and resonance of present-day art on Jewish themes, and reflect and re-interpret millennia of Jewish experiences for the present. Visit: @15 w16th st, NYC

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