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IT’S FUN TO TOUCH AND LEARN
Margaret Samu’s Stern College class visits the museum to learn about handling museum objects, as well as the stories they tell. 
Above, Gila Leipnik on the left, Deborah Bellin on the right.

IT’S FUN TO TOUCH AND LEARN

Margaret Samu’s Stern College class visits the museum to learn about handling museum objects, as well as the stories they tell.

Above, Gila Leipnik on the left, Deborah Bellin on the right.

NICE BOOK - SHAME IF SOMEONE GOT WHINE ON IT 

These are light and gorgeous drawing that appear in an 18th century manuscript of the Haggadah, the script used on the Jewish holiday Passover, or Pesach.  

The central ceremony for the holiday is the Seder, a meal during which participants symbolically reenact (through food of course!) the story of the ancient Hebrews escape from Egyptian slavery. 

This remarkably well preserved manuscript features a colored cover with the high priest and Moses, prayers written to reference the seven-armed candelabra from the ancient Jewish temple, decorated images of scholars eating the Pascal sacrifice (brisket?), and King David with his harp. 

Illuminated Haggadah and Order for Services for Various Holidays, 1746, Germany, Manuscript, 1984.012

ZCURATOR TALKING ABOUT YUM’S EXHIBITION

zcurator:

OF CLOISTERS AND ERUVS

I just got off the phone with an education person from the Cloisters museum about putting together a discussion on the architecture of cloisters and eruvs (Jewish ritual enclosures around neighborhoods and cities). I just love this idea since its juxtaposes two different concept of ritual enclosure, one set apart and beautified (Cloister), and the other permeable and unadorned (Eruv).  Yet, in both cases the intent is the same: delineate space and time for the purpose of ritual observance, though this is slightly debatable. 

These differences are visible here, in an image of the Cloister of Saint Trophime and a city and street eruv from the Ecclesiastical Constitution of Contemporary Jews, Particularly Those in Germany by Johann Christoph Georg Bodenschatz.

If you’re interested in eruvs at all, you should check out the exhibition It’s a Thin Line at YU Museum.

Thanks archimaps:

Inside the cloister of Saint Trophime, Arles

WE WERE ONCE SLAVES 

…But now we’re free. This is the message of Passover, the Jewish holiday celebrating the freedom of the Jews from Ancient Egypt.

These pages are from a 1945 Haggadah (Script for the Passover meal) and they speak specifically to the nature of slavery and freedom. They’re also stunning, sharp images. See more: CJH Catalogue Page

Siegmuch Forst, Ben-Ami Scharfstein, G. Ephros, The Children’s Passover Haggadah, Shilo Publishing House, New York, 1945, 1998.961

IT’S ALIVE! - Learn Hebrew Through Pictures! 

Living Language, the title is the title of this book which teaches young people — like the dandy lad on its cover — how to read and write Hebrew, mostly through pictures. Here’re a few of those pictures.

Published in 1909, at a time when the Hebrew language was rarely spoken outside of religious learning and prayer, this and similar books sought to resurrect what many modern Jews — perhaps the parents of the dandy lad on the cover — regarded as a dead or dying everyday language.  

And why is it here today? Well, it’s almost Pesach (Passover) and the author’s name is Pesach Lev Fishman. So … no relation really.  We just like the picture. 

Safah Chaya, Pesach Lev Fishman, published 1909 by the Hebrew Publishing Company, 1998.895

FROM YUM’S AMULET COLLECTION
Thanks for posting this supramonoperro:

Amulet by Center for Jewish History, NYC on Flickr.

FROM YUM’S AMULET COLLECTION

Thanks for posting this supramonoperro:

Amulet by Center for Jewish History, NYC on Flickr.

HOLIDAY SHOPPING FRENZY … IN MARCH  
The frenzied weeks and days (and hours and minutes and seconds) before the Jewish holiday of Passover are often filled with shopping and more shopping.
Here, Israeli artist David Dzienciarski’s Market Before Passover recalls the frenzy in his hometown of Lodz, when the town’s Jews raced to purchase supplies, mostly food, for the holiday meal and the eight days following it. See more from the artist: CJH Catalogue
Judaism requires holiday observers to avoid eating certain foods on Passover, so many Jews will just buy all new food (and plates and table cloths and… and… ) for the holiday.
David Dzienciarski, Market Before Passover, Israel, 1968, 1991.242

HOLIDAY SHOPPING FRENZY … IN MARCH  

The frenzied weeks and days (and hours and minutes and seconds) before the Jewish holiday of Passover are often filled with shopping and more shopping.

Here, Israeli artist David Dzienciarski’s Market Before Passover recalls the frenzy in his hometown of Lodz, when the town’s Jews raced to purchase supplies, mostly food, for the holiday meal and the eight days following it. See more from the artist: CJH Catalogue

Judaism requires holiday observers to avoid eating certain foods on Passover, so many Jews will just buy all new food (and plates and table cloths and… and… ) for the holiday.

David Dzienciarski, Market Before Passover, Israel, 1968, 1991.242

LIFE’S ROUGH WITH/WITHOUT MATZAH

Thank goodness there’s help if you’re without Matzah on Passover!

Some religious Jews raise funds to help their coreligionists in other communities to have the necessary supplies to fulfill religious observance. These stamps were from of a New York City charity that provided Matzah to poor Jews in Jerusalem in the 1940s for the Passover holiday. 

Booklets of poster stamps for United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, 1940s, Jerusalem, 2001.008 

YUM’S CURATOR ON TOUR 
Read on through and click on through to learn about the excellent tour given last week by YUM’s crackerjack curator. 
zcurator:

I GIVE GOOD TOUR
or so I’m told.  This lovely image is from a tour last week, the part discussing R. Justin Stewart’s Extrusion on view in YUM’s exhibition It’s a Thin Line. 
And, assuming you’re dying to see more pictures from the tour, check out this write up in YU News — as if you haven’t already seen it. CLICK ON ME FOR THE WRITEUP

YUM’S CURATOR ON TOUR 

Read on through and click on through to learn about the excellent tour given last week by YUM’s crackerjack curator. 

zcurator:

I GIVE GOOD TOUR

or so I’m told.  This lovely image is from a tour last week, the part discussing R. Justin Stewart’s Extrusion on view in YUM’s exhibition It’s a Thin Line

And, assuming you’re dying to see more pictures from the tour, check out this write up in YU News — as if you haven’t already seen it. CLICK ON ME FOR THE WRITEUP

COVER UP — YOUR MATZAH IS SHOWING
And, what better way to cover your Matzah than with this decorative Matzah cover from the early 20th century? Have something similar for your Seder?
The cover features Hebrew and Aramaic excerpts from the Passover meal (the seder), and scenes from then contemporary Eretz Yisrael (at the time British Mandate Palestine), ranging from the ancient western wall of the Holy Temple Mout to a matzah factory. 
Oh, and what’s matzah?  It’s an unleavened bread similar to the heavy bread the ancient Hebrews ate as slaves in Egypt. Jews eat Matzah for the eight days of Passover to commemorate their release from slavery.
Matzah Cover, early 20th Century, Land of Israel, 2004.068  

COVER UP — YOUR MATZAH IS SHOWING

And, what better way to cover your Matzah than with this decorative Matzah cover from the early 20th century? Have something similar for your Seder?

The cover features Hebrew and Aramaic excerpts from the Passover meal (the seder), and scenes from then contemporary Eretz Yisrael (at the time British Mandate Palestine), ranging from the ancient western wall of the Holy Temple Mout to a matzah factory. 

Oh, and what’s matzah?  It’s an unleavened bread similar to the heavy bread the ancient Hebrews ate as slaves in Egypt. Jews eat Matzah for the eight days of Passover to commemorate their release from slavery.

Matzah Cover, early 20th Century, Land of Israel, 2004.068  

IT’S FUN TO TOUCH AND LEARN
Margaret Samu’s Stern College class visits the museum to learn about handling museum objects, as well as the stories they tell. 
Above, Gila Leipnik on the left, Deborah Bellin on the right.

IT’S FUN TO TOUCH AND LEARN

Margaret Samu’s Stern College class visits the museum to learn about handling museum objects, as well as the stories they tell.

Above, Gila Leipnik on the left, Deborah Bellin on the right.

NICE BOOK - SHAME IF SOMEONE GOT WHINE ON IT 

These are light and gorgeous drawing that appear in an 18th century manuscript of the Haggadah, the script used on the Jewish holiday Passover, or Pesach.  

The central ceremony for the holiday is the Seder, a meal during which participants symbolically reenact (through food of course!) the story of the ancient Hebrews escape from Egyptian slavery. 

This remarkably well preserved manuscript features a colored cover with the high priest and Moses, prayers written to reference the seven-armed candelabra from the ancient Jewish temple, decorated images of scholars eating the Pascal sacrifice (brisket?), and King David with his harp. 

Illuminated Haggadah and Order for Services for Various Holidays, 1746, Germany, Manuscript, 1984.012

ZCURATOR TALKING ABOUT YUM’S EXHIBITION

zcurator:

OF CLOISTERS AND ERUVS

I just got off the phone with an education person from the Cloisters museum about putting together a discussion on the architecture of cloisters and eruvs (Jewish ritual enclosures around neighborhoods and cities). I just love this idea since its juxtaposes two different concept of ritual enclosure, one set apart and beautified (Cloister), and the other permeable and unadorned (Eruv).  Yet, in both cases the intent is the same: delineate space and time for the purpose of ritual observance, though this is slightly debatable. 

These differences are visible here, in an image of the Cloister of Saint Trophime and a city and street eruv from the Ecclesiastical Constitution of Contemporary Jews, Particularly Those in Germany by Johann Christoph Georg Bodenschatz.

If you’re interested in eruvs at all, you should check out the exhibition It’s a Thin Line at YU Museum.

Thanks archimaps:

Inside the cloister of Saint Trophime, Arles

WE WERE ONCE SLAVES 

…But now we’re free. This is the message of Passover, the Jewish holiday celebrating the freedom of the Jews from Ancient Egypt.

These pages are from a 1945 Haggadah (Script for the Passover meal) and they speak specifically to the nature of slavery and freedom. They’re also stunning, sharp images. See more: CJH Catalogue Page

Siegmuch Forst, Ben-Ami Scharfstein, G. Ephros, The Children’s Passover Haggadah, Shilo Publishing House, New York, 1945, 1998.961

IT’S ALIVE! - Learn Hebrew Through Pictures! 

Living Language, the title is the title of this book which teaches young people — like the dandy lad on its cover — how to read and write Hebrew, mostly through pictures. Here’re a few of those pictures.

Published in 1909, at a time when the Hebrew language was rarely spoken outside of religious learning and prayer, this and similar books sought to resurrect what many modern Jews — perhaps the parents of the dandy lad on the cover — regarded as a dead or dying everyday language.  

And why is it here today? Well, it’s almost Pesach (Passover) and the author’s name is Pesach Lev Fishman. So … no relation really.  We just like the picture. 

Safah Chaya, Pesach Lev Fishman, published 1909 by the Hebrew Publishing Company, 1998.895

FROM YUM’S AMULET COLLECTION
Thanks for posting this supramonoperro:

Amulet by Center for Jewish History, NYC on Flickr.

FROM YUM’S AMULET COLLECTION

Thanks for posting this supramonoperro:

Amulet by Center for Jewish History, NYC on Flickr.

HOLIDAY SHOPPING FRENZY … IN MARCH  
The frenzied weeks and days (and hours and minutes and seconds) before the Jewish holiday of Passover are often filled with shopping and more shopping.
Here, Israeli artist David Dzienciarski’s Market Before Passover recalls the frenzy in his hometown of Lodz, when the town’s Jews raced to purchase supplies, mostly food, for the holiday meal and the eight days following it. See more from the artist: CJH Catalogue
Judaism requires holiday observers to avoid eating certain foods on Passover, so many Jews will just buy all new food (and plates and table cloths and… and… ) for the holiday.
David Dzienciarski, Market Before Passover, Israel, 1968, 1991.242

HOLIDAY SHOPPING FRENZY … IN MARCH  

The frenzied weeks and days (and hours and minutes and seconds) before the Jewish holiday of Passover are often filled with shopping and more shopping.

Here, Israeli artist David Dzienciarski’s Market Before Passover recalls the frenzy in his hometown of Lodz, when the town’s Jews raced to purchase supplies, mostly food, for the holiday meal and the eight days following it. See more from the artist: CJH Catalogue

Judaism requires holiday observers to avoid eating certain foods on Passover, so many Jews will just buy all new food (and plates and table cloths and… and… ) for the holiday.

David Dzienciarski, Market Before Passover, Israel, 1968, 1991.242

LIFE’S ROUGH WITH/WITHOUT MATZAH

Thank goodness there’s help if you’re without Matzah on Passover!

Some religious Jews raise funds to help their coreligionists in other communities to have the necessary supplies to fulfill religious observance. These stamps were from of a New York City charity that provided Matzah to poor Jews in Jerusalem in the 1940s for the Passover holiday. 

Booklets of poster stamps for United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, 1940s, Jerusalem, 2001.008 

YUM’S CURATOR ON TOUR 
Read on through and click on through to learn about the excellent tour given last week by YUM’s crackerjack curator. 
zcurator:

I GIVE GOOD TOUR
or so I’m told.  This lovely image is from a tour last week, the part discussing R. Justin Stewart’s Extrusion on view in YUM’s exhibition It’s a Thin Line. 
And, assuming you’re dying to see more pictures from the tour, check out this write up in YU News — as if you haven’t already seen it. CLICK ON ME FOR THE WRITEUP

YUM’S CURATOR ON TOUR 

Read on through and click on through to learn about the excellent tour given last week by YUM’s crackerjack curator. 

zcurator:

I GIVE GOOD TOUR

or so I’m told.  This lovely image is from a tour last week, the part discussing R. Justin Stewart’s Extrusion on view in YUM’s exhibition It’s a Thin Line

And, assuming you’re dying to see more pictures from the tour, check out this write up in YU News — as if you haven’t already seen it. CLICK ON ME FOR THE WRITEUP

COVER UP — YOUR MATZAH IS SHOWING
And, what better way to cover your Matzah than with this decorative Matzah cover from the early 20th century? Have something similar for your Seder?
The cover features Hebrew and Aramaic excerpts from the Passover meal (the seder), and scenes from then contemporary Eretz Yisrael (at the time British Mandate Palestine), ranging from the ancient western wall of the Holy Temple Mout to a matzah factory. 
Oh, and what’s matzah?  It’s an unleavened bread similar to the heavy bread the ancient Hebrews ate as slaves in Egypt. Jews eat Matzah for the eight days of Passover to commemorate their release from slavery.
Matzah Cover, early 20th Century, Land of Israel, 2004.068  

COVER UP — YOUR MATZAH IS SHOWING

And, what better way to cover your Matzah than with this decorative Matzah cover from the early 20th century? Have something similar for your Seder?

The cover features Hebrew and Aramaic excerpts from the Passover meal (the seder), and scenes from then contemporary Eretz Yisrael (at the time British Mandate Palestine), ranging from the ancient western wall of the Holy Temple Mout to a matzah factory. 

Oh, and what’s matzah?  It’s an unleavened bread similar to the heavy bread the ancient Hebrews ate as slaves in Egypt. Jews eat Matzah for the eight days of Passover to commemorate their release from slavery.

Matzah Cover, early 20th Century, Land of Israel, 2004.068  

About:

YU Museum creates new ways to experience and interpret Jewish art and history. It is a source for new ideas and perspectives on historic events and cultural phenomena effecting everyone.

Visit YU Museum’s exhibitions and programs! They open the eyes of audiences to new perspectives on Jewish culture, historic events and cultural phenomena. They reveal the vitality and resonance of present-day art on Jewish themes, and reflect and re-interpret millennia of Jewish experiences for the present. Visit: @15 w16th st, NYC

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