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BAGELS! GOOD FOR ANY EPIDEMIC IN BROOKLYN! FIX YOUR FLAT TIRE!

From the collection of the Brooklyn Library, this wonderful how-to from the 1960s(?) about making bagels!  And make sure to watch to the end. Well worth it!

Find out more at our friends over in Brooklyn: http://brooklynology.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/post/2010/11/02/Everything-Bagel.aspx

IN CASE YOU MISS THE HEAT… 
On a hot day like yesterday, you’re probably glad you weren’t cooking over an open hearth.
1987.019 Pot, Eastern Europe, copper, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Alice Bergman

IN CASE YOU MISS THE HEAT… 

On a hot day like yesterday, you’re probably glad you weren’t cooking over an open hearth.

1987.019 Pot, Eastern Europe, copper, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Alice Bergman

IT’S SO HOT I CAN SEE THROUGH TIME AND SPACE! 
The heat radiating from NYC on a day like this is comparable to that of the cosmos, subject of this painting by Ruth Abrams — which will be on view in July! 
2006.201 Microcosm, Ruth Abrams (1912-1986), Gift of the Estate of Ruth Abrams, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

IT’S SO HOT I CAN SEE THROUGH TIME AND SPACE! 

The heat radiating from NYC on a day like this is comparable to that of the cosmos, subject of this painting by Ruth Abrams — which will be on view in July! 

2006.201 Microcosm, Ruth Abrams (1912-1986), Gift of the Estate of Ruth Abrams, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

QUIZ OF THE DAY:
Which do you think is hotter today – New York City or the Judean Desert?
1986.013 Desert of Judea, Nota Koslowsky (1906-1972), oil on canvas, New York, ca. 1949, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Leon Koslowsky

QUIZ OF THE DAY:

Which do you think is hotter today – New York City or the Judean Desert?

1986.013 Desert of Judea, Nota Koslowsky (1906-1972), oil on canvas, New York, ca. 1949, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Leon Koslowsky

SERIOUSLY, IT’S THIS HOT?
Take a break from the heat - pause and contemplate the cool waters of Lake Tiberias!
1985.038 Lake Tiberias, Mordecai Avniel (1900-1990), oil on canvas, Israel, The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Collection, Yeshiva University Museum

SERIOUSLY, IT’S THIS HOT?

Take a break from the heat - pause and contemplate the cool waters of Lake Tiberias!

1985.038 Lake Tiberias, Mordecai Avniel (1900-1990), oil on canvas, Israel, The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Collection, Yeshiva University Museum

SO WHEN’S ROSH HASHANA IN 2017? BECAUSE I ALREADY HEAVE A THING AND I’VE MOVED IT TWICE ALREADY…
On the last page of this 24 year calendar that spans from 1940-1969 there is a telling slogan: “Invest Today In America’s Tomorrow!”. This slogan has been used over and over, but somehow it stands out to me. This calendar was produces for the H.J. Heinz Co. In addition to the calendar there are different ads for food products. If investing i in America today would mean buying Heinz ketchup then sign me up.
24 Year Calendar. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2005.29)

SO WHEN’S ROSH HASHANA IN 2017? BECAUSE I ALREADY HEAVE A THING AND I’VE MOVED IT TWICE ALREADY…

On the last page of this 24 year calendar that spans from 1940-1969 there is a telling slogan: “Invest Today In America’s Tomorrow!”. This slogan has been used over and over, but somehow it stands out to me. This calendar was produces for the H.J. Heinz Co. In addition to the calendar there are different ads for food products. If investing i in America today would mean buying Heinz ketchup then sign me up.

24 Year Calendar. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2005.29)

IT’S GETTING HOT OUT THERE, AND IT’S AFTER MEMORIAL DAY!

As heats up, it might be a good time to start wearing white.  But you only have a few months! Even though, wearing white after Labor Day is not necessarily frowned upon anymore, every time I wear white I know that my bubby (grandmother) will say, “No whites after Labor Day!”

(left) White middy blouse with pocket embroidered with three playing cards, black tassel at front neckline, and two buttons.

(right) Uniform. White lab coat with: collar; wrist-length sleeves with button closure; gathered at waist; pocket over right breast inscribed Social Service; 2 pockets in skirt. chest: 17 1/2 in.; waist 12 1/4 in; skirt length waist to hem 24 1/2 in.

Yeshiva University Museum, New York (1999.232) Gift of Lucy Benedikt

BLESS YOU… BLESS ME…
On Father’s Day remember to thank your Dad for all the blessings he has given you.
With Father’s Day on the horizon, it is especially important to remember what our fathers do for us on a daily basis. This late 19th – early 20th century scrap depicts the blessing that is given on the Sabbath by the father to his children. I have seen this blessing done many times, but it is always a special experience. As the father rests his hands on each child’s head, a connection exists that remains with the child for the rest of the week. Perhaps it is time for the children to be blessing their parents. Make sure to do something special for your father in honor of all of the blessings he has given you.
Lithograph, late 19th-early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.175)

BLESS YOU… BLESS ME…

On Father’s Day remember to thank your Dad for all the blessings he has given you.

With Father’s Day on the horizon, it is especially important to remember what our fathers do for us on a daily basis. This late 19th – early 20th century scrap depicts the blessing that is given on the Sabbath by the father to his children. I have seen this blessing done many times, but it is always a special experience. As the father rests his hands on each child’s head, a connection exists that remains with the child for the rest of the week. Perhaps it is time for the children to be blessing their parents. Make sure to do something special for your father in honor of all of the blessings he has given you.

Lithograph, late 19th-early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.175)

WHAT CONDITION OUR DISPOSITION IS IN
“[I]t is to be hoped that individual dispositions will at length mould themselves to the model of the law, and consider the moral basis on which our religions rest, as the rallying point which unites them in a common interest…”  Thomas Jefferson, 1818.
This quote is from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to Mordecai-Manual Noah, in response to a discourse given by Noah at the consecration of the newly built Congregation Shearith Israel in New York in 1818. Noah sent Jefferson, and other leading Americans, his address in order to champion the cause of American Jewry.
Noah was born in 1785 and has been called the most influential American Jew of the early 19th century. Noah was born to a German Immigrant, Manuel Noah, who served in the Militia during the Revolutionary war, and to Zipporah Phillips, the daughter of Jonas Phillips who was an outspoken defender of human rights. It is no wonder that Mordecai–Manual Noah was involved in politics, amongst other endeavors, and eventually became Consul to Tunis. Noah was recalled by the State Department due to reasons of religion.They claimed that his religion prevented him from performing his duties favorably. After being recalled he was extremely disappointed but it encouraged him to work hard to clear his name and to reassert his worth. He focused his attention on journalism and eventually become the editor of the National Advocate.
This letter, from Yeshiva University Museum’s collection, will be displayed at the National Museum of American History in the exhibition To Bigotry No Sanction: George Washington & Religious Freedom opening June 29, 2012. The exhibit’s centerpiece is George Washington’s historic letter to the Hebrew Congregation in  Newport, Rhode Island.Yeshiva University Museum is proud to have this letter shown alongside George Washington’s letter; two letters from great champions of freedom and tolerance of religion.
Letter. May 20th, 1881. Gift of Charles J.Rosenbloom. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1986.059).

WHAT CONDITION OUR DISPOSITION IS IN

“[I]t is to be hoped that individual dispositions will at length mould themselves to the model of the law, and consider the moral basis on which our religions rest, as the rallying point which unites them in a common interest…”  Thomas Jefferson, 1818.

This quote is from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to Mordecai-Manual Noah, in response to a discourse given by Noah at the consecration of the newly built Congregation Shearith Israel in New York in 1818. Noah sent Jefferson, and other leading Americans, his address in order to champion the cause of American Jewry.

Noah was born in 1785 and has been called the most influential American Jew of the early 19th century. Noah was born to a German Immigrant, Manuel Noah, who served in the Militia during the Revolutionary war, and to Zipporah Phillips, the daughter of Jonas Phillips who was an outspoken defender of human rights. It is no wonder that Mordecai–Manual Noah was involved in politics, amongst other endeavors, and eventually became Consul to Tunis. Noah was recalled by the State Department due to reasons of religion.They claimed that his religion prevented him from performing his duties favorably. After being recalled he was extremely disappointed but it encouraged him to work hard to clear his name and to reassert his worth. He focused his attention on journalism and eventually become the editor of the National Advocate.

This letter, from Yeshiva University Museum’s collection, will be displayed at the National Museum of American History in the exhibition To Bigotry No Sanction: George Washington & Religious Freedom opening June 29, 2012. The exhibit’s centerpiece is George Washington’s historic letter to the Hebrew Congregation in  Newport, Rhode Island.Yeshiva University Museum is proud to have this letter shown alongside George Washington’s letter; two letters from great champions of freedom and tolerance of religion.

Letter. May 20th, 1881. Gift of Charles J.Rosenbloom. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1986.059).

REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!
The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.
Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!
This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.
Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!

The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.

Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!

This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.

Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

BAGELS! GOOD FOR ANY EPIDEMIC IN BROOKLYN! FIX YOUR FLAT TIRE!

From the collection of the Brooklyn Library, this wonderful how-to from the 1960s(?) about making bagels!  And make sure to watch to the end. Well worth it!

Find out more at our friends over in Brooklyn: http://brooklynology.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/post/2010/11/02/Everything-Bagel.aspx

IN CASE YOU MISS THE HEAT… 
On a hot day like yesterday, you’re probably glad you weren’t cooking over an open hearth.
1987.019 Pot, Eastern Europe, copper, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Alice Bergman

IN CASE YOU MISS THE HEAT… 

On a hot day like yesterday, you’re probably glad you weren’t cooking over an open hearth.

1987.019 Pot, Eastern Europe, copper, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Alice Bergman

IT’S SO HOT I CAN SEE THROUGH TIME AND SPACE! 
The heat radiating from NYC on a day like this is comparable to that of the cosmos, subject of this painting by Ruth Abrams — which will be on view in July! 
2006.201 Microcosm, Ruth Abrams (1912-1986), Gift of the Estate of Ruth Abrams, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

IT’S SO HOT I CAN SEE THROUGH TIME AND SPACE! 

The heat radiating from NYC on a day like this is comparable to that of the cosmos, subject of this painting by Ruth Abrams — which will be on view in July! 

2006.201 Microcosm, Ruth Abrams (1912-1986), Gift of the Estate of Ruth Abrams, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

QUIZ OF THE DAY:
Which do you think is hotter today – New York City or the Judean Desert?
1986.013 Desert of Judea, Nota Koslowsky (1906-1972), oil on canvas, New York, ca. 1949, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Leon Koslowsky

QUIZ OF THE DAY:

Which do you think is hotter today – New York City or the Judean Desert?

1986.013 Desert of Judea, Nota Koslowsky (1906-1972), oil on canvas, New York, ca. 1949, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Leon Koslowsky

SERIOUSLY, IT’S THIS HOT?
Take a break from the heat - pause and contemplate the cool waters of Lake Tiberias!
1985.038 Lake Tiberias, Mordecai Avniel (1900-1990), oil on canvas, Israel, The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Collection, Yeshiva University Museum

SERIOUSLY, IT’S THIS HOT?

Take a break from the heat - pause and contemplate the cool waters of Lake Tiberias!

1985.038 Lake Tiberias, Mordecai Avniel (1900-1990), oil on canvas, Israel, The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Collection, Yeshiva University Museum

SO WHEN’S ROSH HASHANA IN 2017? BECAUSE I ALREADY HEAVE A THING AND I’VE MOVED IT TWICE ALREADY…
On the last page of this 24 year calendar that spans from 1940-1969 there is a telling slogan: “Invest Today In America’s Tomorrow!”. This slogan has been used over and over, but somehow it stands out to me. This calendar was produces for the H.J. Heinz Co. In addition to the calendar there are different ads for food products. If investing i in America today would mean buying Heinz ketchup then sign me up.
24 Year Calendar. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2005.29)

SO WHEN’S ROSH HASHANA IN 2017? BECAUSE I ALREADY HEAVE A THING AND I’VE MOVED IT TWICE ALREADY…

On the last page of this 24 year calendar that spans from 1940-1969 there is a telling slogan: “Invest Today In America’s Tomorrow!”. This slogan has been used over and over, but somehow it stands out to me. This calendar was produces for the H.J. Heinz Co. In addition to the calendar there are different ads for food products. If investing i in America today would mean buying Heinz ketchup then sign me up.

24 Year Calendar. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2005.29)

IT’S GETTING HOT OUT THERE, AND IT’S AFTER MEMORIAL DAY!

As heats up, it might be a good time to start wearing white.  But you only have a few months! Even though, wearing white after Labor Day is not necessarily frowned upon anymore, every time I wear white I know that my bubby (grandmother) will say, “No whites after Labor Day!”

(left) White middy blouse with pocket embroidered with three playing cards, black tassel at front neckline, and two buttons.

(right) Uniform. White lab coat with: collar; wrist-length sleeves with button closure; gathered at waist; pocket over right breast inscribed Social Service; 2 pockets in skirt. chest: 17 1/2 in.; waist 12 1/4 in; skirt length waist to hem 24 1/2 in.

Yeshiva University Museum, New York (1999.232) Gift of Lucy Benedikt

BLESS YOU… BLESS ME…
On Father’s Day remember to thank your Dad for all the blessings he has given you.
With Father’s Day on the horizon, it is especially important to remember what our fathers do for us on a daily basis. This late 19th – early 20th century scrap depicts the blessing that is given on the Sabbath by the father to his children. I have seen this blessing done many times, but it is always a special experience. As the father rests his hands on each child’s head, a connection exists that remains with the child for the rest of the week. Perhaps it is time for the children to be blessing their parents. Make sure to do something special for your father in honor of all of the blessings he has given you.
Lithograph, late 19th-early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.175)

BLESS YOU… BLESS ME…

On Father’s Day remember to thank your Dad for all the blessings he has given you.

With Father’s Day on the horizon, it is especially important to remember what our fathers do for us on a daily basis. This late 19th – early 20th century scrap depicts the blessing that is given on the Sabbath by the father to his children. I have seen this blessing done many times, but it is always a special experience. As the father rests his hands on each child’s head, a connection exists that remains with the child for the rest of the week. Perhaps it is time for the children to be blessing their parents. Make sure to do something special for your father in honor of all of the blessings he has given you.

Lithograph, late 19th-early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.175)

WHAT CONDITION OUR DISPOSITION IS IN
“[I]t is to be hoped that individual dispositions will at length mould themselves to the model of the law, and consider the moral basis on which our religions rest, as the rallying point which unites them in a common interest…”  Thomas Jefferson, 1818.
This quote is from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to Mordecai-Manual Noah, in response to a discourse given by Noah at the consecration of the newly built Congregation Shearith Israel in New York in 1818. Noah sent Jefferson, and other leading Americans, his address in order to champion the cause of American Jewry.
Noah was born in 1785 and has been called the most influential American Jew of the early 19th century. Noah was born to a German Immigrant, Manuel Noah, who served in the Militia during the Revolutionary war, and to Zipporah Phillips, the daughter of Jonas Phillips who was an outspoken defender of human rights. It is no wonder that Mordecai–Manual Noah was involved in politics, amongst other endeavors, and eventually became Consul to Tunis. Noah was recalled by the State Department due to reasons of religion.They claimed that his religion prevented him from performing his duties favorably. After being recalled he was extremely disappointed but it encouraged him to work hard to clear his name and to reassert his worth. He focused his attention on journalism and eventually become the editor of the National Advocate.
This letter, from Yeshiva University Museum’s collection, will be displayed at the National Museum of American History in the exhibition To Bigotry No Sanction: George Washington & Religious Freedom opening June 29, 2012. The exhibit’s centerpiece is George Washington’s historic letter to the Hebrew Congregation in  Newport, Rhode Island.Yeshiva University Museum is proud to have this letter shown alongside George Washington’s letter; two letters from great champions of freedom and tolerance of religion.
Letter. May 20th, 1881. Gift of Charles J.Rosenbloom. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1986.059).

WHAT CONDITION OUR DISPOSITION IS IN

“[I]t is to be hoped that individual dispositions will at length mould themselves to the model of the law, and consider the moral basis on which our religions rest, as the rallying point which unites them in a common interest…”  Thomas Jefferson, 1818.

This quote is from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to Mordecai-Manual Noah, in response to a discourse given by Noah at the consecration of the newly built Congregation Shearith Israel in New York in 1818. Noah sent Jefferson, and other leading Americans, his address in order to champion the cause of American Jewry.

Noah was born in 1785 and has been called the most influential American Jew of the early 19th century. Noah was born to a German Immigrant, Manuel Noah, who served in the Militia during the Revolutionary war, and to Zipporah Phillips, the daughter of Jonas Phillips who was an outspoken defender of human rights. It is no wonder that Mordecai–Manual Noah was involved in politics, amongst other endeavors, and eventually became Consul to Tunis. Noah was recalled by the State Department due to reasons of religion.They claimed that his religion prevented him from performing his duties favorably. After being recalled he was extremely disappointed but it encouraged him to work hard to clear his name and to reassert his worth. He focused his attention on journalism and eventually become the editor of the National Advocate.

This letter, from Yeshiva University Museum’s collection, will be displayed at the National Museum of American History in the exhibition To Bigotry No Sanction: George Washington & Religious Freedom opening June 29, 2012. The exhibit’s centerpiece is George Washington’s historic letter to the Hebrew Congregation in  Newport, Rhode Island.Yeshiva University Museum is proud to have this letter shown alongside George Washington’s letter; two letters from great champions of freedom and tolerance of religion.

Letter. May 20th, 1881. Gift of Charles J.Rosenbloom. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1986.059).

REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!
The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.
Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!
This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.
Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!

The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.

Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!

This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.

Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

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