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IT’S GETTING HOT OUT THERE, AND IT’S AFTER MEMORIAL DAY!

As heats up, it might be a good time to start wearing white.  But you only have a few months! Even though, wearing white after Labor Day is not necessarily frowned upon anymore, every time I wear white I know that my bubby (grandmother) will say, “No whites after Labor Day!”

(left) White middy blouse with pocket embroidered with three playing cards, black tassel at front neckline, and two buttons.

(right) Uniform. White lab coat with: collar; wrist-length sleeves with button closure; gathered at waist; pocket over right breast inscribed Social Service; 2 pockets in skirt. chest: 17 1/2 in.; waist 12 1/4 in; skirt length waist to hem 24 1/2 in.

Yeshiva University Museum, New York (1999.232) Gift of Lucy Benedikt

BLESS YOU… BLESS ME…
On Father’s Day remember to thank your Dad for all the blessings he has given you.
With Father’s Day on the horizon, it is especially important to remember what our fathers do for us on a daily basis. This late 19th – early 20th century scrap depicts the blessing that is given on the Sabbath by the father to his children. I have seen this blessing done many times, but it is always a special experience. As the father rests his hands on each child’s head, a connection exists that remains with the child for the rest of the week. Perhaps it is time for the children to be blessing their parents. Make sure to do something special for your father in honor of all of the blessings he has given you.
Lithograph, late 19th-early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.175)

BLESS YOU… BLESS ME…

On Father’s Day remember to thank your Dad for all the blessings he has given you.

With Father’s Day on the horizon, it is especially important to remember what our fathers do for us on a daily basis. This late 19th – early 20th century scrap depicts the blessing that is given on the Sabbath by the father to his children. I have seen this blessing done many times, but it is always a special experience. As the father rests his hands on each child’s head, a connection exists that remains with the child for the rest of the week. Perhaps it is time for the children to be blessing their parents. Make sure to do something special for your father in honor of all of the blessings he has given you.

Lithograph, late 19th-early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.175)

WHAT CONDITION OUR DISPOSITION IS IN
“[I]t is to be hoped that individual dispositions will at length mould themselves to the model of the law, and consider the moral basis on which our religions rest, as the rallying point which unites them in a common interest…”  Thomas Jefferson, 1818.
This quote is from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to Mordecai-Manual Noah, in response to a discourse given by Noah at the consecration of the newly built Congregation Shearith Israel in New York in 1818. Noah sent Jefferson, and other leading Americans, his address in order to champion the cause of American Jewry.
Noah was born in 1785 and has been called the most influential American Jew of the early 19th century. Noah was born to a German Immigrant, Manuel Noah, who served in the Militia during the Revolutionary war, and to Zipporah Phillips, the daughter of Jonas Phillips who was an outspoken defender of human rights. It is no wonder that Mordecai–Manual Noah was involved in politics, amongst other endeavors, and eventually became Consul to Tunis. Noah was recalled by the State Department due to reasons of religion.They claimed that his religion prevented him from performing his duties favorably. After being recalled he was extremely disappointed but it encouraged him to work hard to clear his name and to reassert his worth. He focused his attention on journalism and eventually become the editor of the National Advocate.
This letter, from Yeshiva University Museum’s collection, will be displayed at the National Museum of American History in the exhibition To Bigotry No Sanction: George Washington & Religious Freedom opening June 29, 2012. The exhibit’s centerpiece is George Washington’s historic letter to the Hebrew Congregation in  Newport, Rhode Island.Yeshiva University Museum is proud to have this letter shown alongside George Washington’s letter; two letters from great champions of freedom and tolerance of religion.
Letter. May 20th, 1881. Gift of Charles J.Rosenbloom. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1986.059).

WHAT CONDITION OUR DISPOSITION IS IN

“[I]t is to be hoped that individual dispositions will at length mould themselves to the model of the law, and consider the moral basis on which our religions rest, as the rallying point which unites them in a common interest…”  Thomas Jefferson, 1818.

This quote is from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to Mordecai-Manual Noah, in response to a discourse given by Noah at the consecration of the newly built Congregation Shearith Israel in New York in 1818. Noah sent Jefferson, and other leading Americans, his address in order to champion the cause of American Jewry.

Noah was born in 1785 and has been called the most influential American Jew of the early 19th century. Noah was born to a German Immigrant, Manuel Noah, who served in the Militia during the Revolutionary war, and to Zipporah Phillips, the daughter of Jonas Phillips who was an outspoken defender of human rights. It is no wonder that Mordecai–Manual Noah was involved in politics, amongst other endeavors, and eventually became Consul to Tunis. Noah was recalled by the State Department due to reasons of religion.They claimed that his religion prevented him from performing his duties favorably. After being recalled he was extremely disappointed but it encouraged him to work hard to clear his name and to reassert his worth. He focused his attention on journalism and eventually become the editor of the National Advocate.

This letter, from Yeshiva University Museum’s collection, will be displayed at the National Museum of American History in the exhibition To Bigotry No Sanction: George Washington & Religious Freedom opening June 29, 2012. The exhibit’s centerpiece is George Washington’s historic letter to the Hebrew Congregation in  Newport, Rhode Island.Yeshiva University Museum is proud to have this letter shown alongside George Washington’s letter; two letters from great champions of freedom and tolerance of religion.

Letter. May 20th, 1881. Gift of Charles J.Rosenbloom. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1986.059).

REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!
The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.
Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!
This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.
Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!

The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.

Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!

This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.

Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

A CURTSY FOR THE OLD DAYS
"Here’s to a dance with dear old Dad.
"Do you remember dancing with your Dad when you were little? I certainly do and I  assume that this girl did as well. I always pretended to be embarrassed but really I enjoyed stepping on his feet and swirling in circles. The girl in the photograph wore this outfit as a play costume in 1940 or 41 but it was originally made in 1901 or 02. This Father’s Day do a curtsy for the old days and enjoy some quality time with your Dad."
- Naomi (Curatorial Intern, YUM)
Black and White Photograph, ca. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1999.176)

A CURTSY FOR THE OLD DAYS

"Here’s to a dance with dear old Dad.

"Do you remember dancing with your Dad when you were little? I certainly do and I  assume that this girl did as well. I always pretended to be embarrassed but really I enjoyed stepping on his feet and swirling in circles. The girl in the photograph wore this outfit as a play costume in 1940 or 41 but it was originally made in 1901 or 02. This Father’s Day do a curtsy for the old days and enjoy some quality time with your Dad."

- Naomi (Curatorial Intern, YUM)

Black and White Photograph, ca. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1999.176)

SEND A POSTCARD … OR A BATIK IF YOU’RE VISITING RACHEL’S TOMB

This textile and postcard depict Rachel’s Tomb, where the matriarch Rachel is believed to be buried.  The tomb is considered one of the holiest places on Earth by Jews, Christians, and Muslims.  Jews have made pilgrimages to the tomb since ancient times, and women in particular visit it to pray for fertility and healthy childbirth.  Some Jews have also taken the tomb as a symbol of the state of Israel and Jewish people’s return to their homeland. 

Postcard: Rachel’s tomb. Copyright Sinai, Tel Aviv, Israel. Postcard made after one of Raban’s Ten Views of Israel published by M. Narkiss and Bezalel in 1931. Inscribed on back that is the pillar of Rachel’s grave unto this day (Gen. 35/20). Rachel holding lamb and Jacob with lamb on shoulders frame tomb.

Rectangular textile decorated with framed image showing road, tree (left), domed building (Rachel’s tomb] center with a figure standing next to it, and a man in streimmel at right.

Postcard, printed.  M. Narkiss and Bezalel, 1931.  Tel Aviv, Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1992.195).

Cotton, printed.  Pro Palestine Association, early 20th century.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2004.080).

DID YOU COUNT DOWN TO CHEESECAKE?  …Like you need an excuse…
Remember that a calendar like this can both help you to count the omer and teach you some Hebrew.
This Hebrew calendar from 1939 was made for Wolozin’s of Eldridge Street New York& Philadelphia. In addition to the pages of the months there are pictures of Torah Arc curtains and Torah ornaments. This Hebrew calendar would have been very helpful for the every day lives of Jews in New York. When comparing this calendar to the Jewish calendars of today, ours are not so different. This calendar lists all of the holidays and fast days and the times that the Sabbath starts and ends, as well as the days that are to be counted for the omer. With the omer half over, we can now count down to the amazing cheese cakes we will eat on Shavuot. Traditionally, dairy is served on Shavuot. There are many reasons, but the one that stands out to me is that before the Israelites received the Torah they were not obliged to keep kosher or perform ritual slaughter of animals. After the Israelites received the Torah on Shavuot there meat dishes had to be made kosher so they opted for dairy food. We eat dairy today in order to remember this event. Use a calendar, like this one, in order to remember how many days until all of the dairy delights!
Calendar, 1939. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.302)

DID YOU COUNT DOWN TO CHEESECAKE?  …Like you need an excuse…

Remember that a calendar like this can both help you to count the omer and teach you some Hebrew.

This Hebrew calendar from 1939 was made for Wolozin’s of Eldridge Street New York& Philadelphia. In addition to the pages of the months there are pictures of Torah Arc curtains and Torah ornaments. This Hebrew calendar would have been very helpful for the every day lives of Jews in New York. When comparing this calendar to the Jewish calendars of today, ours are not so different. This calendar lists all of the holidays and fast days and the times that the Sabbath starts and ends, as well as the days that are to be counted for the omer. With the omer half over, we can now count down to the amazing cheese cakes we will eat on Shavuot. Traditionally, dairy is served on Shavuot. There are many reasons, but the one that stands out to me is that before the Israelites received the Torah they were not obliged to keep kosher or perform ritual slaughter of animals. After the Israelites received the Torah on Shavuot there meat dishes had to be made kosher so they opted for dairy food. We eat dairy today in order to remember this event. Use a calendar, like this one, in order to remember how many days until all of the dairy delights!

Calendar, 1939. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.302)

CAN YOU SEE IT? LOOK AT THE TORAH ON SHEVUOT AND REMEMBER MT SINAI LIKE IT’S GOING OUT OF STYLE!
As we count down to Shavuot (also known as the Festival of Weeks), this postcard reminds me of the importance of the Torah in Judaism. As the person lifts the Torah up into the air for all to see (also known as Hagba), it is as though the Torah is being given for the first time on the first Shavuot at Mount Sinai. This postcard, from the 20th century, was created by Paul Gruedel in Frankfort. It shows the interior of a synagogue with a focus on the bimah (the elevated platform from which the Torah is read). From the bimah, the person lifting the Torah makes sure that everyone can see, even the smallest of children. The title on the postcard reads Aufheben der Tora or picked up the Torah, which, of course, is a fitting title.  For all of you synagogue-goers out there, make sure to pay attention to the lifting of the Torah and remember that Hagba has a long tradition behind it.
Postcard, 20th Century. Gift from Rachayl David. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.171)

CAN YOU SEE IT? LOOK AT THE TORAH ON SHEVUOT AND REMEMBER MT SINAI LIKE IT’S GOING OUT OF STYLE!

As we count down to Shavuot (also known as the Festival of Weeks), this postcard reminds me of the importance of the Torah in Judaism. As the person lifts the Torah up into the air for all to see (also known as Hagba), it is as though the Torah is being given for the first time on the first Shavuot at Mount Sinai. This postcard, from the 20th century, was created by Paul Gruedel in Frankfort. It shows the interior of a synagogue with a focus on the bimah (the elevated platform from which the Torah is read). From the bimah, the person lifting the Torah makes sure that everyone can see, even the smallest of children. The title on the postcard reads Aufheben der Tora or picked up the Torah, which, of course, is a fitting title.  For all of you synagogue-goers out there, make sure to pay attention to the lifting of the Torah and remember that Hagba has a long tradition behind it.

Postcard, 20th Century. Gift from Rachayl David. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.171)

GIVING AND RECEIVING
Shavuot is a time to remember when the Israelites stood at the base of Mount Sinai and this is a little reminder. This Torah shield, from 1826/1827, is a representation of the  tablets on which the Ten Commandments are inscribed. It would have been hung around the top of a Torah, thus the reason for the metal chain which extends from the top of the tablets.
Historically, the giving of the Torah happened at Mount Sinai on Shavuot and so it is a time to celebrate. For this reason, Shavuot is also called Hag Matan Torateinu (the Festival of the Giving of the Torah). 
Also known as the Festival of Weeks, Shavuot is one of the three major festivals when the Israelites would have gone to Jerusalem to visit the Temple (the other two are Passover and Sukkot). Shavuot has both agricultural significance and historical significance. In terms of Shavuot’s agricultural significance, it was the time to bring the first fruits of the harvest to the Temple. Thus Shavuot is also called Hag ha-Bikkurim (the Festival of the First Fruit).
It is important to remember that Shavuot is called the “giving” of the Torah, rather then the “receiving” of the Torah. The sages explain that the first time the Torah was “given”.  After that moment of “giving”, the Torah is constantly being “received” every single day. That is why the use of the term “giving” is key to understanding the holiday of Shavuot.
Torah Sheild, 1826/1827. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.298).

GIVING AND RECEIVING

Shavuot is a time to remember when the Israelites stood at the base of Mount Sinai and this is a little reminder. This Torah shield, from 1826/1827, is a representation of the  tablets on which the Ten Commandments are inscribed. It would have been hung around the top of a Torah, thus the reason for the metal chain which extends from the top of the tablets.

Historically, the giving of the Torah happened at Mount Sinai on Shavuot and so it is a time to celebrate. For this reason, Shavuot is also called Hag Matan Torateinu (the Festival of the Giving of the Torah). 

Also known as the Festival of Weeks, Shavuot is one of the three major festivals when the Israelites would have gone to Jerusalem to visit the Temple (the other two are Passover and Sukkot). Shavuot has both agricultural significance and historical significance. In terms of Shavuot’s agricultural significance, it was the time to bring the first fruits of the harvest to the Temple. Thus Shavuot is also called Hag ha-Bikkurim (the Festival of the First Fruit).

It is important to remember that Shavuot is called the “giving” of the Torah, rather then the “receiving” of the Torah. The sages explain that the first time the Torah was “given”.  After that moment of “giving”, the Torah is constantly being “received” every single day. That is why the use of the term “giving” is key to understanding the holiday of Shavuot.

Torah Sheild, 1826/1827. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.298).

IT’S GETTING HOT OUT THERE, AND IT’S AFTER MEMORIAL DAY!

As heats up, it might be a good time to start wearing white.  But you only have a few months! Even though, wearing white after Labor Day is not necessarily frowned upon anymore, every time I wear white I know that my bubby (grandmother) will say, “No whites after Labor Day!”

(left) White middy blouse with pocket embroidered with three playing cards, black tassel at front neckline, and two buttons.

(right) Uniform. White lab coat with: collar; wrist-length sleeves with button closure; gathered at waist; pocket over right breast inscribed Social Service; 2 pockets in skirt. chest: 17 1/2 in.; waist 12 1/4 in; skirt length waist to hem 24 1/2 in.

Yeshiva University Museum, New York (1999.232) Gift of Lucy Benedikt

BLESS YOU… BLESS ME…
On Father’s Day remember to thank your Dad for all the blessings he has given you.
With Father’s Day on the horizon, it is especially important to remember what our fathers do for us on a daily basis. This late 19th – early 20th century scrap depicts the blessing that is given on the Sabbath by the father to his children. I have seen this blessing done many times, but it is always a special experience. As the father rests his hands on each child’s head, a connection exists that remains with the child for the rest of the week. Perhaps it is time for the children to be blessing their parents. Make sure to do something special for your father in honor of all of the blessings he has given you.
Lithograph, late 19th-early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.175)

BLESS YOU… BLESS ME…

On Father’s Day remember to thank your Dad for all the blessings he has given you.

With Father’s Day on the horizon, it is especially important to remember what our fathers do for us on a daily basis. This late 19th – early 20th century scrap depicts the blessing that is given on the Sabbath by the father to his children. I have seen this blessing done many times, but it is always a special experience. As the father rests his hands on each child’s head, a connection exists that remains with the child for the rest of the week. Perhaps it is time for the children to be blessing their parents. Make sure to do something special for your father in honor of all of the blessings he has given you.

Lithograph, late 19th-early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.175)

WHAT CONDITION OUR DISPOSITION IS IN
“[I]t is to be hoped that individual dispositions will at length mould themselves to the model of the law, and consider the moral basis on which our religions rest, as the rallying point which unites them in a common interest…”  Thomas Jefferson, 1818.
This quote is from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to Mordecai-Manual Noah, in response to a discourse given by Noah at the consecration of the newly built Congregation Shearith Israel in New York in 1818. Noah sent Jefferson, and other leading Americans, his address in order to champion the cause of American Jewry.
Noah was born in 1785 and has been called the most influential American Jew of the early 19th century. Noah was born to a German Immigrant, Manuel Noah, who served in the Militia during the Revolutionary war, and to Zipporah Phillips, the daughter of Jonas Phillips who was an outspoken defender of human rights. It is no wonder that Mordecai–Manual Noah was involved in politics, amongst other endeavors, and eventually became Consul to Tunis. Noah was recalled by the State Department due to reasons of religion.They claimed that his religion prevented him from performing his duties favorably. After being recalled he was extremely disappointed but it encouraged him to work hard to clear his name and to reassert his worth. He focused his attention on journalism and eventually become the editor of the National Advocate.
This letter, from Yeshiva University Museum’s collection, will be displayed at the National Museum of American History in the exhibition To Bigotry No Sanction: George Washington & Religious Freedom opening June 29, 2012. The exhibit’s centerpiece is George Washington’s historic letter to the Hebrew Congregation in  Newport, Rhode Island.Yeshiva University Museum is proud to have this letter shown alongside George Washington’s letter; two letters from great champions of freedom and tolerance of religion.
Letter. May 20th, 1881. Gift of Charles J.Rosenbloom. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1986.059).

WHAT CONDITION OUR DISPOSITION IS IN

“[I]t is to be hoped that individual dispositions will at length mould themselves to the model of the law, and consider the moral basis on which our religions rest, as the rallying point which unites them in a common interest…”  Thomas Jefferson, 1818.

This quote is from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to Mordecai-Manual Noah, in response to a discourse given by Noah at the consecration of the newly built Congregation Shearith Israel in New York in 1818. Noah sent Jefferson, and other leading Americans, his address in order to champion the cause of American Jewry.

Noah was born in 1785 and has been called the most influential American Jew of the early 19th century. Noah was born to a German Immigrant, Manuel Noah, who served in the Militia during the Revolutionary war, and to Zipporah Phillips, the daughter of Jonas Phillips who was an outspoken defender of human rights. It is no wonder that Mordecai–Manual Noah was involved in politics, amongst other endeavors, and eventually became Consul to Tunis. Noah was recalled by the State Department due to reasons of religion.They claimed that his religion prevented him from performing his duties favorably. After being recalled he was extremely disappointed but it encouraged him to work hard to clear his name and to reassert his worth. He focused his attention on journalism and eventually become the editor of the National Advocate.

This letter, from Yeshiva University Museum’s collection, will be displayed at the National Museum of American History in the exhibition To Bigotry No Sanction: George Washington & Religious Freedom opening June 29, 2012. The exhibit’s centerpiece is George Washington’s historic letter to the Hebrew Congregation in  Newport, Rhode Island.Yeshiva University Museum is proud to have this letter shown alongside George Washington’s letter; two letters from great champions of freedom and tolerance of religion.

Letter. May 20th, 1881. Gift of Charles J.Rosenbloom. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1986.059).

REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!
The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.
Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!
This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.
Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!

The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.

Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!

This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.

Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

A CURTSY FOR THE OLD DAYS
"Here’s to a dance with dear old Dad.
"Do you remember dancing with your Dad when you were little? I certainly do and I  assume that this girl did as well. I always pretended to be embarrassed but really I enjoyed stepping on his feet and swirling in circles. The girl in the photograph wore this outfit as a play costume in 1940 or 41 but it was originally made in 1901 or 02. This Father’s Day do a curtsy for the old days and enjoy some quality time with your Dad."
- Naomi (Curatorial Intern, YUM)
Black and White Photograph, ca. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1999.176)

A CURTSY FOR THE OLD DAYS

"Here’s to a dance with dear old Dad.

"Do you remember dancing with your Dad when you were little? I certainly do and I  assume that this girl did as well. I always pretended to be embarrassed but really I enjoyed stepping on his feet and swirling in circles. The girl in the photograph wore this outfit as a play costume in 1940 or 41 but it was originally made in 1901 or 02. This Father’s Day do a curtsy for the old days and enjoy some quality time with your Dad."

- Naomi (Curatorial Intern, YUM)

Black and White Photograph, ca. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1999.176)

SEND A POSTCARD … OR A BATIK IF YOU’RE VISITING RACHEL’S TOMB

This textile and postcard depict Rachel’s Tomb, where the matriarch Rachel is believed to be buried.  The tomb is considered one of the holiest places on Earth by Jews, Christians, and Muslims.  Jews have made pilgrimages to the tomb since ancient times, and women in particular visit it to pray for fertility and healthy childbirth.  Some Jews have also taken the tomb as a symbol of the state of Israel and Jewish people’s return to their homeland. 

Postcard: Rachel’s tomb. Copyright Sinai, Tel Aviv, Israel. Postcard made after one of Raban’s Ten Views of Israel published by M. Narkiss and Bezalel in 1931. Inscribed on back that is the pillar of Rachel’s grave unto this day (Gen. 35/20). Rachel holding lamb and Jacob with lamb on shoulders frame tomb.

Rectangular textile decorated with framed image showing road, tree (left), domed building (Rachel’s tomb] center with a figure standing next to it, and a man in streimmel at right.

Postcard, printed.  M. Narkiss and Bezalel, 1931.  Tel Aviv, Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1992.195).

Cotton, printed.  Pro Palestine Association, early 20th century.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2004.080).

DID YOU COUNT DOWN TO CHEESECAKE?  …Like you need an excuse…
Remember that a calendar like this can both help you to count the omer and teach you some Hebrew.
This Hebrew calendar from 1939 was made for Wolozin’s of Eldridge Street New York& Philadelphia. In addition to the pages of the months there are pictures of Torah Arc curtains and Torah ornaments. This Hebrew calendar would have been very helpful for the every day lives of Jews in New York. When comparing this calendar to the Jewish calendars of today, ours are not so different. This calendar lists all of the holidays and fast days and the times that the Sabbath starts and ends, as well as the days that are to be counted for the omer. With the omer half over, we can now count down to the amazing cheese cakes we will eat on Shavuot. Traditionally, dairy is served on Shavuot. There are many reasons, but the one that stands out to me is that before the Israelites received the Torah they were not obliged to keep kosher or perform ritual slaughter of animals. After the Israelites received the Torah on Shavuot there meat dishes had to be made kosher so they opted for dairy food. We eat dairy today in order to remember this event. Use a calendar, like this one, in order to remember how many days until all of the dairy delights!
Calendar, 1939. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.302)

DID YOU COUNT DOWN TO CHEESECAKE?  …Like you need an excuse…

Remember that a calendar like this can both help you to count the omer and teach you some Hebrew.

This Hebrew calendar from 1939 was made for Wolozin’s of Eldridge Street New York& Philadelphia. In addition to the pages of the months there are pictures of Torah Arc curtains and Torah ornaments. This Hebrew calendar would have been very helpful for the every day lives of Jews in New York. When comparing this calendar to the Jewish calendars of today, ours are not so different. This calendar lists all of the holidays and fast days and the times that the Sabbath starts and ends, as well as the days that are to be counted for the omer. With the omer half over, we can now count down to the amazing cheese cakes we will eat on Shavuot. Traditionally, dairy is served on Shavuot. There are many reasons, but the one that stands out to me is that before the Israelites received the Torah they were not obliged to keep kosher or perform ritual slaughter of animals. After the Israelites received the Torah on Shavuot there meat dishes had to be made kosher so they opted for dairy food. We eat dairy today in order to remember this event. Use a calendar, like this one, in order to remember how many days until all of the dairy delights!

Calendar, 1939. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.302)

CAN YOU SEE IT? LOOK AT THE TORAH ON SHEVUOT AND REMEMBER MT SINAI LIKE IT’S GOING OUT OF STYLE!
As we count down to Shavuot (also known as the Festival of Weeks), this postcard reminds me of the importance of the Torah in Judaism. As the person lifts the Torah up into the air for all to see (also known as Hagba), it is as though the Torah is being given for the first time on the first Shavuot at Mount Sinai. This postcard, from the 20th century, was created by Paul Gruedel in Frankfort. It shows the interior of a synagogue with a focus on the bimah (the elevated platform from which the Torah is read). From the bimah, the person lifting the Torah makes sure that everyone can see, even the smallest of children. The title on the postcard reads Aufheben der Tora or picked up the Torah, which, of course, is a fitting title.  For all of you synagogue-goers out there, make sure to pay attention to the lifting of the Torah and remember that Hagba has a long tradition behind it.
Postcard, 20th Century. Gift from Rachayl David. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.171)

CAN YOU SEE IT? LOOK AT THE TORAH ON SHEVUOT AND REMEMBER MT SINAI LIKE IT’S GOING OUT OF STYLE!

As we count down to Shavuot (also known as the Festival of Weeks), this postcard reminds me of the importance of the Torah in Judaism. As the person lifts the Torah up into the air for all to see (also known as Hagba), it is as though the Torah is being given for the first time on the first Shavuot at Mount Sinai. This postcard, from the 20th century, was created by Paul Gruedel in Frankfort. It shows the interior of a synagogue with a focus on the bimah (the elevated platform from which the Torah is read). From the bimah, the person lifting the Torah makes sure that everyone can see, even the smallest of children. The title on the postcard reads Aufheben der Tora or picked up the Torah, which, of course, is a fitting title.  For all of you synagogue-goers out there, make sure to pay attention to the lifting of the Torah and remember that Hagba has a long tradition behind it.

Postcard, 20th Century. Gift from Rachayl David. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.171)

GIVING AND RECEIVING
Shavuot is a time to remember when the Israelites stood at the base of Mount Sinai and this is a little reminder. This Torah shield, from 1826/1827, is a representation of the  tablets on which the Ten Commandments are inscribed. It would have been hung around the top of a Torah, thus the reason for the metal chain which extends from the top of the tablets.
Historically, the giving of the Torah happened at Mount Sinai on Shavuot and so it is a time to celebrate. For this reason, Shavuot is also called Hag Matan Torateinu (the Festival of the Giving of the Torah). 
Also known as the Festival of Weeks, Shavuot is one of the three major festivals when the Israelites would have gone to Jerusalem to visit the Temple (the other two are Passover and Sukkot). Shavuot has both agricultural significance and historical significance. In terms of Shavuot’s agricultural significance, it was the time to bring the first fruits of the harvest to the Temple. Thus Shavuot is also called Hag ha-Bikkurim (the Festival of the First Fruit).
It is important to remember that Shavuot is called the “giving” of the Torah, rather then the “receiving” of the Torah. The sages explain that the first time the Torah was “given”.  After that moment of “giving”, the Torah is constantly being “received” every single day. That is why the use of the term “giving” is key to understanding the holiday of Shavuot.
Torah Sheild, 1826/1827. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.298).

GIVING AND RECEIVING

Shavuot is a time to remember when the Israelites stood at the base of Mount Sinai and this is a little reminder. This Torah shield, from 1826/1827, is a representation of the  tablets on which the Ten Commandments are inscribed. It would have been hung around the top of a Torah, thus the reason for the metal chain which extends from the top of the tablets.

Historically, the giving of the Torah happened at Mount Sinai on Shavuot and so it is a time to celebrate. For this reason, Shavuot is also called Hag Matan Torateinu (the Festival of the Giving of the Torah). 

Also known as the Festival of Weeks, Shavuot is one of the three major festivals when the Israelites would have gone to Jerusalem to visit the Temple (the other two are Passover and Sukkot). Shavuot has both agricultural significance and historical significance. In terms of Shavuot’s agricultural significance, it was the time to bring the first fruits of the harvest to the Temple. Thus Shavuot is also called Hag ha-Bikkurim (the Festival of the First Fruit).

It is important to remember that Shavuot is called the “giving” of the Torah, rather then the “receiving” of the Torah. The sages explain that the first time the Torah was “given”.  After that moment of “giving”, the Torah is constantly being “received” every single day. That is why the use of the term “giving” is key to understanding the holiday of Shavuot.

Torah Sheild, 1826/1827. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.298).

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