/page/19

TIME FOR A LITTLE ROMANCE

A little bit of poetry to make your day!

With all of his work in politics and educating youth, finding the time to write romantic poetry is no small feat. This book of poetry, Poems from the German, was compiled in the 20th century. This particular poem was written by Johann Ludwig Uhland and is titled “Castle by the Sea”. Uhland is best known for his romantic poetry, but, he was also an attorney and later struggled to restore parliamentary democracy in Wurttenberg in present-day Germany. He also worked a short while as a professor.  You would think that Uhland would be jaded from his work in politics. This poem, which is a portion of a longer poem, shows a softer side to Uhland.

Books & Manuscripts, 1976. New York. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1998.036).

A MOTHER’S LOVE AND UPPER BODY STRENGTH?  PRICELESS.
Tackle your own mom in the waist this Mother’s Day, May 13!
This 50-Lirot silver coin was produced in Israel in 1979.  The front face depicts a mother bouncing a baby in the air while another child embraces her at the waist.  Inscriptions in both English and Hebrew read, “Mother of Children, Psalms 113,9.” 
Silver coin, 1979.  Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2009.160)

A MOTHER’S LOVE AND UPPER BODY STRENGTH?  PRICELESS.

Tackle your own mom in the waist this Mother’s Day, May 13!

This 50-Lirot silver coin was produced in Israel in 1979.  The front face depicts a mother bouncing a baby in the air while another child embraces her at the waist.  Inscriptions in both English and Hebrew read, “Mother of Children, Psalms 113,9.” 

Silver coin, 1979.  Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2009.160)

MAMA - I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND
When was the last time you held your mother’s hand?  Try doing it this Mother’s Day, May 13!
This postcard features a photograph of a Tunisian Jewish woman and her daughter holding hands while standing on a shore.  The woman’s robes and conical headdress are representative of the traditional dress of Jewish Tunisian women during the early 20th century. 
Postcard.  Neurdein et Cie.  Paris, France, early 20th century.  Paper, printed.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.232).

MAMA - I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND

When was the last time you held your mother’s hand?  Try doing it this Mother’s Day, May 13!

This postcard features a photograph of a Tunisian Jewish woman and her daughter holding hands while standing on a shore.  The woman’s robes and conical headdress are representative of the traditional dress of Jewish Tunisian women during the early 20th century. 

Postcard.  Neurdein et Cie.  Paris, France, early 20th century.  Paper, printed.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.232).

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!
Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   
Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!

Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   

Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

LAST CHANCE TO SEE GRAPHIC DETAILS - CONFESSIONAL COMICS BY JEWISH WOMEN
Closes Sunday!
Sophisticated yet raw, nakedly diaristic storytelling is what makes these comics so compelling. By turns funny, outrageous, poignant and embarrassingly intimate, the works reflect each of the 18 featured artist’s individual journeys refracted through a distinctively Jewish lens in a pop-culture art form. Some bare their bodies. Some expose their psyches. All are fearless about experiences, emotions, desires, romance and politics.
Featuring original work by 18 of the most influential creators, Graphic Details showcases work of all-stars from the pioneering Wimmen’s Comix and Twisted Sisters artists of the 1970s and 1980s to the superstars of the new generation.  Many of the cartoons in Graphic Details have never been displayed in public until now.  The artists, who hail from the U.S., Canada, Israel and the UK include: Vanessa Davis; Bernice Eisenstein; Sarah Glidden; Miriam Katin; Aline Kominsky-Crumb; Miss Lasko-Gross; Sarah Lazarovic; Miriam Libicki; Sarah Lightman; Diane Noomin; Corinne Pearlman; Trina Robbins; Racheli Rotner; Sharon Rudahl; Laurie Sandell; Ariel Schrag; Lauren Weinstein; and Ilana Zeffren.
Find out more at http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/GraphicDetails
Image: From I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors, by Bernice Eisenstein, McClellan & Stewart Ltd., 2006.

LAST CHANCE TO SEE GRAPHIC DETAILS - CONFESSIONAL COMICS BY JEWISH WOMEN

Closes Sunday!

Sophisticated yet raw, nakedly diaristic storytelling is what makes these comics so compelling. By turns funny, outrageous, poignant and embarrassingly intimate, the works reflect each of the 18 featured artist’s individual journeys refracted through a distinctively Jewish lens in a pop-culture art form. Some bare their bodies. Some expose their psyches. All are fearless about experiences, emotions, desires, romance and politics.

Featuring original work by 18 of the most influential creators, Graphic Details showcases work of all-stars from the pioneering Wimmen’s Comix and Twisted Sisters artists of the 1970s and 1980s to the superstars of the new generation.  Many of the cartoons in Graphic Details have never been displayed in public until now.  The artists, who hail from the U.S., Canada, Israel and the UK include: Vanessa Davis; Bernice Eisenstein; Sarah Glidden; Miriam Katin; Aline Kominsky-Crumb; Miss Lasko-Gross; Sarah Lazarovic; Miriam Libicki; Sarah Lightman; Diane Noomin; Corinne Pearlman; Trina Robbins; Racheli Rotner; Sharon Rudahl; Laurie Sandell; Ariel Schrag; Lauren Weinstein; and Ilana Zeffren.

Find out more at http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/GraphicDetails

Image: From I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors, by Bernice Eisenstein, McClellan & Stewart Ltd., 2006.

DID YOU KNOW ABOUT YUM’S DAZZLING JUDAICA COLLECTION?
If you’ve been watching YUM’s posts for a while, you’ll likely have noticed that we have a lot of Jewish ceremonial and decorative objects.  Well, we also have a special website for one of our collections, the Max Stern Collection of Judaica.  Check it out on the collection’s site: http://www.yumuseum.org/maxsterncatalog/
During his lifetime, Mr. Stern (1898-1982)spent many enjoyable hours acquiring and assembling these Judaica pieces.  Stern was a legend in his lifetime. Arriving in the United States as an immigrant from Fulda, Germany, he built up a major business – Hartz Mountain. But other than his acknowledged material success, he achieved his real and enduring greatness as a philanthropist for a variety of causes.

DID YOU KNOW ABOUT YUM’S DAZZLING JUDAICA COLLECTION?

If you’ve been watching YUM’s posts for a while, you’ll likely have noticed that we have a lot of Jewish ceremonial and decorative objects.  Well, we also have a special website for one of our collections, the Max Stern Collection of Judaica.  Check it out on the collection’s site: http://www.yumuseum.org/maxsterncatalog/

During his lifetime, Mr. Stern (1898-1982)spent many enjoyable hours acquiring and assembling these Judaica pieces.  Stern was a legend in his lifetime. Arriving in the United States as an immigrant from Fulda, Germany, he built up a major business – Hartz Mountain. But other than his acknowledged material success, he achieved his real and enduring greatness as a philanthropist for a variety of causes.

DOOR TO ANOTHER WORLD - THE BEN-EZRA SYNAGOGUE ARK DOOR
Coming to YU Museum in 2013, the Ben-Ezra Synagogue. Read on to find out more!
From “Treasures from the Ben Ezra Synagogue” on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Bizantium and Islam: Age of Transition exhibition blog. 
by Yitzchak Schwartz, Research Associate, Yeshiva University
Monday, April 2, 2012
Several of the Jewish manuscripts on view in Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition, including the example shown above, are thought to have come from the Cairo Genizah, a repository of communal, religious, and business documents housed in the attic of the tenth-century Ben Ezra Synagogue in Cairo that was re-discovered in 1896 by Cambridge scholar Solomon Schechter
The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore and the Yeshiva University Museum in New York City co-own another treasure from the Ben Ezra Synagogue: one of the doors of the synagogue’s ark, the compartment where the scriptures are kept. According to an article in the Baltimore Sun (August 30, 2000), the door was discovered at an estate sale in central Florida in 1993 or 1994 and purchased for $37.50. After experts—including Byzantium and Islam catalogue contributor Steven Fine—identified the panel as originating from the Ben Ezra Synagogue, and testing confirmed that it dated to the eleventh century, it was acquired by the museums as a joint purchase.
Read the rest of this discussion on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Bizantium and Islam: Age of Transition exhibition blog.
Image: Panel from a Torah Shrine, ca. 1040. Cairo, Egypt. Wood (walnut) with traces of paint and gilt. 34 3/8 x 14 7/16 x 1 in. (87.3 x 36.7 x 2.5 cm). The Walters Art Museum and Yeshiva University Museum (64.181)

DOOR TO ANOTHER WORLD - THE BEN-EZRA SYNAGOGUE ARK DOOR

Coming to YU Museum in 2013, the Ben-Ezra Synagogue. Read on to find out more!

From “Treasures from the Ben Ezra Synagogue” on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Bizantium and Islam: Age of Transition exhibition blog

by Yitzchak Schwartz, Research Associate, Yeshiva University

Monday, April 2, 2012

Several of the Jewish manuscripts on view in Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition, including the example shown above, are thought to have come from the Cairo Genizah, a repository of communal, religious, and business documents housed in the attic of the tenth-century Ben Ezra Synagogue in Cairo that was re-discovered in 1896 by Cambridge scholar Solomon Schechter

The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore and the Yeshiva University Museum in New York City co-own another treasure from the Ben Ezra Synagogue: one of the doors of the synagogue’s ark, the compartment where the scriptures are kept. According to an article in the Baltimore Sun (August 30, 2000), the door was discovered at an estate sale in central Florida in 1993 or 1994 and purchased for $37.50. After experts—including Byzantium and Islam catalogue contributor Steven Fine—identified the panel as originating from the Ben Ezra Synagogue, and testing confirmed that it dated to the eleventh century, it was acquired by the museums as a joint purchase.

Read the rest of this discussion on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Bizantium and Islam: Age of Transition exhibition blog.

Image: Panel from a Torah Shrine, ca. 1040. Cairo, Egypt. Wood (walnut) with traces of paint and gilt. 34 3/8 x 14 7/16 x 1 in. (87.3 x 36.7 x 2.5 cm). The Walters Art Museum and Yeshiva University Museum (64.181)

DOES WORK EVER FEEL LIKE IT’S SUCKING YOUR LIFE AWAY?

Day after day, night after night, sometimes work can grind you down.  Fortunately if not ironically, the travails of what you might call “soul-sucking work” can lead to incredible artistic reactions… such as this combination of graphic work and poetry about life behind a sewing machine.  Take a look below for the description, and test your German (and German script reading) skills!

Thanks 16thstreet!

Click on the images above to see enlarged versions for easier viewing/reading.

At the Sewing Machine (from Songs of the Ghetto)

Poem by Morris Rosenfeld (1862-1923) with translation from Yiddish by Berthold Feiwel (1875-1937). Illustration by Ephraim Moses Lilien (1874-1925). 

Berlin, Benjamin Harz Verlag ca. 1902.

Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1996.023). Gift of Michael Cohn.

-

A haunting image from the famed and groundbreaking Zionist artist Ephraim Moses Lilien sits next to a poem about what it was like for workers in one of the most common occupations for Jews at the end of the 19th and into the early 20th century: sewing. Work at the sewing machine, “Day after day,” and “Year after year” was indeed an occupation, but certainly not a healthy one, as poet Morris Rosenfeld and Lilien seem to argue. Rather, it was a way of working that ultimately robbed the body of its spirit, its vim and its vigor! This piece appeared in the intensely beautiful book, Lieder des Ghetto (Songs of the Ghetto), a poetic and graphic piece of from a Zionist point of view against what they saw as the spiritually and physically impoverished state of Jews in the Diaspora. 

This book is currently displayed in YU Museum’s exhibition here at the Center, Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860 – 1960, on view through August 2012. Click here to find out more about the show.

Submitted by Zachary Paul Levine, Yeshiva University Museum.

IN MEMORIUM - A SONG FOR THE DISASTER
Today marks 100 years since the disastrous sinking of the Titanic, a name tragically resonant in the popular memory and imagination.  Yet, with this much time, the tragedy is more historical fact than much else. Keep in mind that this sinking came at a moment when millions of people were streaming from Europe to America aboard much smaller and less robust ships. The crossing, though routine, was never 100% safe.
This cover from the sheet music for a Yiddish-language song hints at the significance of the Titanic tragedy in 1912: an image of a couple embracing, possibly immigrants on their way to meet family and settle in a new land, their journey cut short. They’re martyred, but at least they’re crowned in heaven.   Indeed, the concept of martyrdom is hinted at by the Yiddish title, “Churban” which can mean disaster, but also sacrifice.
Hurban Titanic (The Titanic’s Disaster)
Yiddish Sheet Music, copyright 1912
Lyrics: Solomon Small (Smulewitz)
Collection of YIVO Institute
Thank ludmirermoyd!

Sheet music for “Khurbn Titanik, oder Der Naser Keyver” (“The Titanic’s Disaster, or the Watery Grave”), 1912.

IN MEMORIUM - A SONG FOR THE DISASTER

Today marks 100 years since the disastrous sinking of the Titanic, a name tragically resonant in the popular memory and imagination.  Yet, with this much time, the tragedy is more historical fact than much else. Keep in mind that this sinking came at a moment when millions of people were streaming from Europe to America aboard much smaller and less robust ships. The crossing, though routine, was never 100% safe.

This cover from the sheet music for a Yiddish-language song hints at the significance of the Titanic tragedy in 1912: an image of a couple embracing, possibly immigrants on their way to meet family and settle in a new land, their journey cut short. They’re martyred, but at least they’re crowned in heaven.   Indeed, the concept of martyrdom is hinted at by the Yiddish title, “Churban” which can mean disaster, but also sacrifice.

Hurban Titanic (The Titanic’s Disaster)

Yiddish Sheet Music, copyright 1912

Lyrics: Solomon Small (Smulewitz)

Collection of YIVO Institute

Thank ludmirermoyd!

Sheet music for “Khurbn Titanik, oder Der Naser Keyver” (“The Titanic’s Disaster, or the Watery Grave”), 1912.

TIME FOR A LITTLE ROMANCE

A little bit of poetry to make your day!

With all of his work in politics and educating youth, finding the time to write romantic poetry is no small feat. This book of poetry, Poems from the German, was compiled in the 20th century. This particular poem was written by Johann Ludwig Uhland and is titled “Castle by the Sea”. Uhland is best known for his romantic poetry, but, he was also an attorney and later struggled to restore parliamentary democracy in Wurttenberg in present-day Germany. He also worked a short while as a professor.  You would think that Uhland would be jaded from his work in politics. This poem, which is a portion of a longer poem, shows a softer side to Uhland.

Books & Manuscripts, 1976. New York. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1998.036).

A MOTHER’S LOVE AND UPPER BODY STRENGTH?  PRICELESS.
Tackle your own mom in the waist this Mother’s Day, May 13!
This 50-Lirot silver coin was produced in Israel in 1979.  The front face depicts a mother bouncing a baby in the air while another child embraces her at the waist.  Inscriptions in both English and Hebrew read, “Mother of Children, Psalms 113,9.” 
Silver coin, 1979.  Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2009.160)

A MOTHER’S LOVE AND UPPER BODY STRENGTH?  PRICELESS.

Tackle your own mom in the waist this Mother’s Day, May 13!

This 50-Lirot silver coin was produced in Israel in 1979.  The front face depicts a mother bouncing a baby in the air while another child embraces her at the waist.  Inscriptions in both English and Hebrew read, “Mother of Children, Psalms 113,9.” 

Silver coin, 1979.  Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2009.160)

MAMA - I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND
When was the last time you held your mother’s hand?  Try doing it this Mother’s Day, May 13!
This postcard features a photograph of a Tunisian Jewish woman and her daughter holding hands while standing on a shore.  The woman’s robes and conical headdress are representative of the traditional dress of Jewish Tunisian women during the early 20th century. 
Postcard.  Neurdein et Cie.  Paris, France, early 20th century.  Paper, printed.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.232).

MAMA - I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND

When was the last time you held your mother’s hand?  Try doing it this Mother’s Day, May 13!

This postcard features a photograph of a Tunisian Jewish woman and her daughter holding hands while standing on a shore.  The woman’s robes and conical headdress are representative of the traditional dress of Jewish Tunisian women during the early 20th century. 

Postcard.  Neurdein et Cie.  Paris, France, early 20th century.  Paper, printed.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.232).

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!
Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   
Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!

Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   

Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

LAST CHANCE TO SEE GRAPHIC DETAILS - CONFESSIONAL COMICS BY JEWISH WOMEN
Closes Sunday!
Sophisticated yet raw, nakedly diaristic storytelling is what makes these comics so compelling. By turns funny, outrageous, poignant and embarrassingly intimate, the works reflect each of the 18 featured artist’s individual journeys refracted through a distinctively Jewish lens in a pop-culture art form. Some bare their bodies. Some expose their psyches. All are fearless about experiences, emotions, desires, romance and politics.
Featuring original work by 18 of the most influential creators, Graphic Details showcases work of all-stars from the pioneering Wimmen’s Comix and Twisted Sisters artists of the 1970s and 1980s to the superstars of the new generation.  Many of the cartoons in Graphic Details have never been displayed in public until now.  The artists, who hail from the U.S., Canada, Israel and the UK include: Vanessa Davis; Bernice Eisenstein; Sarah Glidden; Miriam Katin; Aline Kominsky-Crumb; Miss Lasko-Gross; Sarah Lazarovic; Miriam Libicki; Sarah Lightman; Diane Noomin; Corinne Pearlman; Trina Robbins; Racheli Rotner; Sharon Rudahl; Laurie Sandell; Ariel Schrag; Lauren Weinstein; and Ilana Zeffren.
Find out more at http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/GraphicDetails
Image: From I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors, by Bernice Eisenstein, McClellan & Stewart Ltd., 2006.

LAST CHANCE TO SEE GRAPHIC DETAILS - CONFESSIONAL COMICS BY JEWISH WOMEN

Closes Sunday!

Sophisticated yet raw, nakedly diaristic storytelling is what makes these comics so compelling. By turns funny, outrageous, poignant and embarrassingly intimate, the works reflect each of the 18 featured artist’s individual journeys refracted through a distinctively Jewish lens in a pop-culture art form. Some bare their bodies. Some expose their psyches. All are fearless about experiences, emotions, desires, romance and politics.

Featuring original work by 18 of the most influential creators, Graphic Details showcases work of all-stars from the pioneering Wimmen’s Comix and Twisted Sisters artists of the 1970s and 1980s to the superstars of the new generation.  Many of the cartoons in Graphic Details have never been displayed in public until now.  The artists, who hail from the U.S., Canada, Israel and the UK include: Vanessa Davis; Bernice Eisenstein; Sarah Glidden; Miriam Katin; Aline Kominsky-Crumb; Miss Lasko-Gross; Sarah Lazarovic; Miriam Libicki; Sarah Lightman; Diane Noomin; Corinne Pearlman; Trina Robbins; Racheli Rotner; Sharon Rudahl; Laurie Sandell; Ariel Schrag; Lauren Weinstein; and Ilana Zeffren.

Find out more at http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/GraphicDetails

Image: From I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors, by Bernice Eisenstein, McClellan & Stewart Ltd., 2006.

DID YOU KNOW ABOUT YUM’S DAZZLING JUDAICA COLLECTION?
If you’ve been watching YUM’s posts for a while, you’ll likely have noticed that we have a lot of Jewish ceremonial and decorative objects.  Well, we also have a special website for one of our collections, the Max Stern Collection of Judaica.  Check it out on the collection’s site: http://www.yumuseum.org/maxsterncatalog/
During his lifetime, Mr. Stern (1898-1982)spent many enjoyable hours acquiring and assembling these Judaica pieces.  Stern was a legend in his lifetime. Arriving in the United States as an immigrant from Fulda, Germany, he built up a major business – Hartz Mountain. But other than his acknowledged material success, he achieved his real and enduring greatness as a philanthropist for a variety of causes.

DID YOU KNOW ABOUT YUM’S DAZZLING JUDAICA COLLECTION?

If you’ve been watching YUM’s posts for a while, you’ll likely have noticed that we have a lot of Jewish ceremonial and decorative objects.  Well, we also have a special website for one of our collections, the Max Stern Collection of Judaica.  Check it out on the collection’s site: http://www.yumuseum.org/maxsterncatalog/

During his lifetime, Mr. Stern (1898-1982)spent many enjoyable hours acquiring and assembling these Judaica pieces.  Stern was a legend in his lifetime. Arriving in the United States as an immigrant from Fulda, Germany, he built up a major business – Hartz Mountain. But other than his acknowledged material success, he achieved his real and enduring greatness as a philanthropist for a variety of causes.

DOOR TO ANOTHER WORLD - THE BEN-EZRA SYNAGOGUE ARK DOOR
Coming to YU Museum in 2013, the Ben-Ezra Synagogue. Read on to find out more!
From “Treasures from the Ben Ezra Synagogue” on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Bizantium and Islam: Age of Transition exhibition blog. 
by Yitzchak Schwartz, Research Associate, Yeshiva University
Monday, April 2, 2012
Several of the Jewish manuscripts on view in Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition, including the example shown above, are thought to have come from the Cairo Genizah, a repository of communal, religious, and business documents housed in the attic of the tenth-century Ben Ezra Synagogue in Cairo that was re-discovered in 1896 by Cambridge scholar Solomon Schechter
The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore and the Yeshiva University Museum in New York City co-own another treasure from the Ben Ezra Synagogue: one of the doors of the synagogue’s ark, the compartment where the scriptures are kept. According to an article in the Baltimore Sun (August 30, 2000), the door was discovered at an estate sale in central Florida in 1993 or 1994 and purchased for $37.50. After experts—including Byzantium and Islam catalogue contributor Steven Fine—identified the panel as originating from the Ben Ezra Synagogue, and testing confirmed that it dated to the eleventh century, it was acquired by the museums as a joint purchase.
Read the rest of this discussion on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Bizantium and Islam: Age of Transition exhibition blog.
Image: Panel from a Torah Shrine, ca. 1040. Cairo, Egypt. Wood (walnut) with traces of paint and gilt. 34 3/8 x 14 7/16 x 1 in. (87.3 x 36.7 x 2.5 cm). The Walters Art Museum and Yeshiva University Museum (64.181)

DOOR TO ANOTHER WORLD - THE BEN-EZRA SYNAGOGUE ARK DOOR

Coming to YU Museum in 2013, the Ben-Ezra Synagogue. Read on to find out more!

From “Treasures from the Ben Ezra Synagogue” on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Bizantium and Islam: Age of Transition exhibition blog

by Yitzchak Schwartz, Research Associate, Yeshiva University

Monday, April 2, 2012

Several of the Jewish manuscripts on view in Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition, including the example shown above, are thought to have come from the Cairo Genizah, a repository of communal, religious, and business documents housed in the attic of the tenth-century Ben Ezra Synagogue in Cairo that was re-discovered in 1896 by Cambridge scholar Solomon Schechter

The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore and the Yeshiva University Museum in New York City co-own another treasure from the Ben Ezra Synagogue: one of the doors of the synagogue’s ark, the compartment where the scriptures are kept. According to an article in the Baltimore Sun (August 30, 2000), the door was discovered at an estate sale in central Florida in 1993 or 1994 and purchased for $37.50. After experts—including Byzantium and Islam catalogue contributor Steven Fine—identified the panel as originating from the Ben Ezra Synagogue, and testing confirmed that it dated to the eleventh century, it was acquired by the museums as a joint purchase.

Read the rest of this discussion on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Bizantium and Islam: Age of Transition exhibition blog.

Image: Panel from a Torah Shrine, ca. 1040. Cairo, Egypt. Wood (walnut) with traces of paint and gilt. 34 3/8 x 14 7/16 x 1 in. (87.3 x 36.7 x 2.5 cm). The Walters Art Museum and Yeshiva University Museum (64.181)

DOES WORK EVER FEEL LIKE IT’S SUCKING YOUR LIFE AWAY?

Day after day, night after night, sometimes work can grind you down.  Fortunately if not ironically, the travails of what you might call “soul-sucking work” can lead to incredible artistic reactions… such as this combination of graphic work and poetry about life behind a sewing machine.  Take a look below for the description, and test your German (and German script reading) skills!

Thanks 16thstreet!

Click on the images above to see enlarged versions for easier viewing/reading.

At the Sewing Machine (from Songs of the Ghetto)

Poem by Morris Rosenfeld (1862-1923) with translation from Yiddish by Berthold Feiwel (1875-1937). Illustration by Ephraim Moses Lilien (1874-1925). 

Berlin, Benjamin Harz Verlag ca. 1902.

Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1996.023). Gift of Michael Cohn.

-

A haunting image from the famed and groundbreaking Zionist artist Ephraim Moses Lilien sits next to a poem about what it was like for workers in one of the most common occupations for Jews at the end of the 19th and into the early 20th century: sewing. Work at the sewing machine, “Day after day,” and “Year after year” was indeed an occupation, but certainly not a healthy one, as poet Morris Rosenfeld and Lilien seem to argue. Rather, it was a way of working that ultimately robbed the body of its spirit, its vim and its vigor! This piece appeared in the intensely beautiful book, Lieder des Ghetto (Songs of the Ghetto), a poetic and graphic piece of from a Zionist point of view against what they saw as the spiritually and physically impoverished state of Jews in the Diaspora. 

This book is currently displayed in YU Museum’s exhibition here at the Center, Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860 – 1960, on view through August 2012. Click here to find out more about the show.

Submitted by Zachary Paul Levine, Yeshiva University Museum.

IN MEMORIUM - A SONG FOR THE DISASTER
Today marks 100 years since the disastrous sinking of the Titanic, a name tragically resonant in the popular memory and imagination.  Yet, with this much time, the tragedy is more historical fact than much else. Keep in mind that this sinking came at a moment when millions of people were streaming from Europe to America aboard much smaller and less robust ships. The crossing, though routine, was never 100% safe.
This cover from the sheet music for a Yiddish-language song hints at the significance of the Titanic tragedy in 1912: an image of a couple embracing, possibly immigrants on their way to meet family and settle in a new land, their journey cut short. They’re martyred, but at least they’re crowned in heaven.   Indeed, the concept of martyrdom is hinted at by the Yiddish title, “Churban” which can mean disaster, but also sacrifice.
Hurban Titanic (The Titanic’s Disaster)
Yiddish Sheet Music, copyright 1912
Lyrics: Solomon Small (Smulewitz)
Collection of YIVO Institute
Thank ludmirermoyd!

Sheet music for “Khurbn Titanik, oder Der Naser Keyver” (“The Titanic’s Disaster, or the Watery Grave”), 1912.

IN MEMORIUM - A SONG FOR THE DISASTER

Today marks 100 years since the disastrous sinking of the Titanic, a name tragically resonant in the popular memory and imagination.  Yet, with this much time, the tragedy is more historical fact than much else. Keep in mind that this sinking came at a moment when millions of people were streaming from Europe to America aboard much smaller and less robust ships. The crossing, though routine, was never 100% safe.

This cover from the sheet music for a Yiddish-language song hints at the significance of the Titanic tragedy in 1912: an image of a couple embracing, possibly immigrants on their way to meet family and settle in a new land, their journey cut short. They’re martyred, but at least they’re crowned in heaven.   Indeed, the concept of martyrdom is hinted at by the Yiddish title, “Churban” which can mean disaster, but also sacrifice.

Hurban Titanic (The Titanic’s Disaster)

Yiddish Sheet Music, copyright 1912

Lyrics: Solomon Small (Smulewitz)

Collection of YIVO Institute

Thank ludmirermoyd!

Sheet music for “Khurbn Titanik, oder Der Naser Keyver” (“The Titanic’s Disaster, or the Watery Grave”), 1912.

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