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* Foto: © Židovské muzeum v Praze 
MARK PODWAL’S TORAH ARK CURTAIN INSTALLED  IN ALTNEUSCHUL IN PRAGUE 
If you missed YUM’s presentation of Mark Podwal’s new textiles for the Altneuschul in Prague, you can still see the pieces… in Prague!  The following article (in Czech) discusses the pieces, their installation, and their significance.  
And check out the short video produced by curator Zachary Paul Levine on the development of these textiles at YUM’s Vimeo page: https://vimeo.com/34334552
Here’s the article:
Výtvarník Marek Podwal daroval Staronové synagoze nové synagogální textilie
Patnáctého března zažila pražská židovská obec mimořádnou událost. Ve Staronové synagoze byly zasvěceny nové synagogální textilie navržené a darované významným americkým výtvarníkem a obdivovatelem židovské Prahy Markem Podwalem.
Novým rituálním textiliím dominuje parochet, tedy monumentální opona, zakrývající v synagoze svatostánek se schránkou na Tóru. K souboru dále patří tři pláštíky na svitky Tóry, pokrývky na pult k předčítání z Tóry a povlaky na polštářky. Textilie jsou zhotoveny z brokátu a mají bohaté výšivky s tradičními židovskými motivy.  
read on…

* Foto: © Židovské muzeum v Praze

MARK PODWAL’S TORAH ARK CURTAIN INSTALLED  IN ALTNEUSCHUL IN PRAGUE

If you missed YUM’s presentation of Mark Podwal’s new textiles for the Altneuschul in Prague, you can still see the pieces… in Prague!  The following article (in Czech) discusses the pieces, their installation, and their significance. 

And check out the short video produced by curator Zachary Paul Levine on the development of these textiles at YUM’s Vimeo page: https://vimeo.com/34334552

Here’s the article:

Výtvarník Marek Podwal daroval Staronové synagoze nové synagogální textilie

Patnáctého března zažila pražská židovská obec mimořádnou událost. Ve Staronové synagoze byly zasvěceny nové synagogální textilie navržené a darované významným americkým výtvarníkem a obdivovatelem židovské Prahy Markem Podwalem.

Novým rituálním textiliím dominuje parochet, tedy monumentální opona, zakrývající v synagoze svatostánek se schránkou na Tóru. K souboru dále patří tři pláštíky na svitky Tóry, pokrývky na pult k předčítání z Tóry a povlaky na polštářky. Textilie jsou zhotoveny z brokátu a mají bohaté výšivky s tradičními židovskými motivy.  

read on…

SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!
The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens! 
Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring. 
This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel. 
2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!

The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens!

Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring.

This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel.

2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

THERE ARE FOUR SONS. WHICH ARE YOU ON PASSOVER?
 Joseph Steinhardt’s vision of the four sons of the Passover Haggadah are highly personalized, rather than based on traditional depictions. Here the wicked son, traditionally depicted as a soldier, wears a Prussian uniform and carries a sword. The other sons: wise, simple, and the one who does not know how to ask a question.
Passover Haggadah, artist Joseph Steinhardt (1888-1940), Vienna and Berlin, 1921. Gift of Estelle Heinrich. Collection of YU Museum (2001.387)

THERE ARE FOUR SONS. WHICH ARE YOU ON PASSOVER?

Joseph Steinhardt’s vision of the four sons of the Passover Haggadah are highly personalized, rather than based on traditional depictions. Here the wicked son, traditionally depicted as a soldier, wears a Prussian uniform and carries a sword. The other sons: wise, simple, and the one who does not know how to ask a question.

Passover Haggadah, artist Joseph Steinhardt (1888-1940), Vienna and Berlin, 1921. Gift of Estelle Heinrich. Collection of YU Museum (2001.387)

LION VS BIRD! LION VS BIRD! or WHY IS IT SO RARE TO SEE A ROOSTER ON A MEDICAL DIPLOMA THESE DAYS?
This 1492 Italian diploma for a Jewish doctor is decorated with an animated confrontation between a rooster and a dog.  You can view this dazzling document in YU Museum’s current exhibition Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960, on view February 26 - August 12, 2012 @YU Museum 
  
*Photo credit: Braginsky Collection, Zurich

LION VS BIRD! LION VS BIRD! or WHY IS IT SO RARE TO SEE A ROOSTER ON A MEDICAL DIPLOMA THESE DAYS?

This 1492 Italian diploma for a Jewish doctor is decorated with an animated confrontation between a rooster and a dog.  You can view this dazzling document in YU Museum’s current exhibition Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960, on view February 26 - August 12, 2012 @YU Museum


 

*Photo credit: Braginsky Collection, Zurich

From Buzzine:THE TRUE STORY OF THE FATHER OF CHEMOTHERAPY, INSPIRATION FOR A CLASSIC FILM
By: Roslyn Bernstein
March 19, 2012

In 1940, Hollywood mogul Hal Wallis produced Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet — a biopic that starred Edward G. Robinson in the title role of scientist Paul Ehrlich (1854-1915). The film “became Hollywood’s single most important exposition of medical history,” said historian of medicine Bert Hansen, the author of Picturing Medical Progress from Pasteur to Polio. For the general public, the film “offered a remarkably rich dramatization of scientific conceptions and of the process of laboratory research and discovery.”

A pioneer in the study of cells and tissues, Ehrlich was known “as the father of chemotherapy — the treatment of illness using chemicals that selectively target disease-causing agents.” He called these chemical agents “magic bullets,” and his discovery of Salvarsan, the first of these bullets, dramatically changed the treatment of Syphilis.


Ehrlich’s story, and the stories of other prominent Jewish doctors, are featured in a modest but engaging exhibit, “Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960,” that recently opened at the Yeshiva University Museum in New York. The show, presented in collaboration with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, will be up until August 12th.  
Read the whole article at Buzzinelifestyle.com
* Image: Exterminate Flies. They spread diseases. Keep your home and yard clean. Cover your food!, OSE Poster  Printed by Paul Schöpf, Berlin 1926, with the aid of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, and distributed in Eastern Europe by OZE, Collection of YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

From Buzzine:THE TRUE STORY OF THE FATHER OF CHEMOTHERAPY, INSPIRATION FOR A CLASSIC FILM

In 1940, Hollywood mogul Hal Wallis produced Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet — a biopic that starred Edward G. Robinson in the title role of scientist Paul Ehrlich (1854-1915). The film “became Hollywood’s single most important exposition of medical history,” said historian of medicine Bert Hansen, the author of Picturing Medical Progress from Pasteur to Polio. For the general public, the film “offered a remarkably rich dramatization of scientific conceptions and of the process of laboratory research and discovery.”

A pioneer in the study of cells and tissues, Ehrlich was known “as the father of chemotherapy — the treatment of illness using chemicals that selectively target disease-causing agents.” He called these chemical agents “magic bullets,” and his discovery of Salvarsan, the first of these bullets, dramatically changed the treatment of Syphilis.

Ehrlich’s story, and the stories of other prominent Jewish doctors, are featured in a modest but engaging exhibit, “Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960,” that recently opened at the Yeshiva University Museum in New York. The show, presented in collaboration with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, will be up until August 12th. 

Read the whole article at Buzzinelifestyle.com

* Image: Exterminate Flies. They spread diseases. Keep your home and yard clean. Cover your food!, OSE Poster  Printed by Paul Schöpf, Berlin 1926, with the aid of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, and distributed in Eastern Europe by OZE, Collection of YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

WHY DOES THIS VIDEO SEEM A BIT WEIRD TO ME? - QUICK COMMENTARY FROM THE CURATOR

The following is a commentary response from YUM’s curator, and not indicative of any views held by YU Museum

Purim is a magical, entertaining, and nearly-always raucous occasion.  This seemingly adorable video starts with what seems like an interfaith reading of the scroll of Esther, but quickly morphs into a jolly, alcohol-infused romp of Hasidic men, with some subtle nods to the bottle dance from Fiddler on the Roof (where it originated… don’t kid yourself about it’s ‘authenticity’). Though this video is really adorable visually, it brings up some rather disturbing ideas:

That, in the end, to celebrate Jewishly, one should probably be Chasidic men dancing in a circle, because, after all, isn’t that the center of Judaism? What does this image say about pluralism, tolerance, and the goals for Judaism?  What does it say about a ‘Jewish’ view of and expectations for other religions and cultures? What are we supposed to think of the Buddhist monk who suddenly dons Chasidic garb—and a stereotypically large nose to boot?

That Purim is time for celebration marked by stereotypical dancing and alcohol guzzling. This is about on the mark as American vision of St. Patrick’s Day, which characterizes Irish people and Irish culture in an equally if not incredibly pernicious negative light. Some inebriation is part of Purim observance, but it is neither the center nor the point of the holiday.

The short cartoon ends with a salutation for a Happy Purim.  That’s wonderful, great, and absolutely in the spirit of the holiday. But I dare say that there are underlying images that are, at the very least, of dubious meaning, and, at worst, portray some negative stereotypes.

Thanks deborahfeldman!

Cute!

CARING IN STYLE - Amazing BCH Nurse’s Cape from VNSNY
If only nurses uniforms today looked so stylish. Like my grandmother says “they don’t make things like they used to.”  The women of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York were dedicated to helping those in need, and they did so with style. This beautiful cape is currently on display at YUM courtesy the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY). 
This cape has the initials BCH on the lapel, standing for the Bureau of Child Hygiene or Health.  The BCH was a New York City-run program for looking after mothers and children in the city’s poorest neighborhoods.  It was organized by several VNSNY leaders including VNS founder Lillian Wald, who spent her life creating programs and organizations that worked on behalf of children.  Starting in 1907, the BCH adapted the VNS approach of care and service, and by 1912 the BCH had become a model for other cities, states, and in fact the federal government’s national efforts to care for America’s poorest children. This incredible artifact hints at the fantastic impact of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York.
You can see this piece of history and learn more about the VNSNY in YUM’s exhibition Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine now on view.
Nurses Cape, 1930’s-50’s, courtesy Visiting Nurse Service of New York

CARING IN STYLE - Amazing BCH Nurse’s Cape from VNSNY

If only nurses uniforms today looked so stylish. Like my grandmother says “they don’t make things like they used to.”  The women of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York were dedicated to helping those in need, and they did so with style. This beautiful cape is currently on display at YUM courtesy the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY). 

This cape has the initials BCH on the lapel, standing for the Bureau of Child Hygiene or Health.  The BCH was a New York City-run program for looking after mothers and children in the city’s poorest neighborhoods.  It was organized by several VNSNY leaders including VNS founder Lillian Wald, who spent her life creating programs and organizations that worked on behalf of children.  Starting in 1907, the BCH adapted the VNS approach of care and service, and by 1912 the BCH had become a model for other cities, states, and in fact the federal government’s national efforts to care for America’s poorest children. This incredible artifact hints at the fantastic impact of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York.

You can see this piece of history and learn more about the VNSNY in YUM’s exhibition Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine now on view.

Nurses Cape, 1930’s-50’s, courtesy Visiting Nurse Service of New York

HEAL, YOU SHALL HEAL - FILM FROM TRAIL OF THE MAGIC BULLET

What would you do if prenatal genetic testing revealed a future of pain and suffering for your unborn child? What if your parent or grandparent refused a life-saving pacemaker? How would you deal with these life-and-death decisions? And what does Jewish tradition have to say about these issues?

This film explore these questions. You’ll hear from doctors, patients, rabbis, and ethicists who offer their unique perspectives on these real-life medical dilemmas. The lively discussion offers a window onto the rich dialogue at the intersection between medicine and Jewish tradition.

'Heal, You Shall Heal' was produced for the exhibition Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960, at YU Museum in NYC February 26 - August 12, 2012. Find out more at the Exhibition Website: yumuseum.tumblr.com/MagicBullet

Produced and Directed by Ilana Trachtman
Editor: Zelda Breenstein

Images: The Library of the Jewish Theological Seminary, Jewish Museum in Prague, the Ginsburg/ Myers Family, Tia Powell, Veer
Sponsorship for ‘Heal, You Shall Heal’ and the exhibition: Leon Levy Foundation, the David Berg Foundation, Rene and Susanne Braginsky Foundation, Anonymous, The Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey

Exhibition Curator: Josh Feinberg

Copyright Yeshiva University Museum, 2012

* Foto: © Židovské muzeum v Praze 
MARK PODWAL’S TORAH ARK CURTAIN INSTALLED  IN ALTNEUSCHUL IN PRAGUE 
If you missed YUM’s presentation of Mark Podwal’s new textiles for the Altneuschul in Prague, you can still see the pieces… in Prague!  The following article (in Czech) discusses the pieces, their installation, and their significance.  
And check out the short video produced by curator Zachary Paul Levine on the development of these textiles at YUM’s Vimeo page: https://vimeo.com/34334552
Here’s the article:
Výtvarník Marek Podwal daroval Staronové synagoze nové synagogální textilie
Patnáctého března zažila pražská židovská obec mimořádnou událost. Ve Staronové synagoze byly zasvěceny nové synagogální textilie navržené a darované významným americkým výtvarníkem a obdivovatelem židovské Prahy Markem Podwalem.
Novým rituálním textiliím dominuje parochet, tedy monumentální opona, zakrývající v synagoze svatostánek se schránkou na Tóru. K souboru dále patří tři pláštíky na svitky Tóry, pokrývky na pult k předčítání z Tóry a povlaky na polštářky. Textilie jsou zhotoveny z brokátu a mají bohaté výšivky s tradičními židovskými motivy.  
read on…

* Foto: © Židovské muzeum v Praze

MARK PODWAL’S TORAH ARK CURTAIN INSTALLED  IN ALTNEUSCHUL IN PRAGUE

If you missed YUM’s presentation of Mark Podwal’s new textiles for the Altneuschul in Prague, you can still see the pieces… in Prague!  The following article (in Czech) discusses the pieces, their installation, and their significance. 

And check out the short video produced by curator Zachary Paul Levine on the development of these textiles at YUM’s Vimeo page: https://vimeo.com/34334552

Here’s the article:

Výtvarník Marek Podwal daroval Staronové synagoze nové synagogální textilie

Patnáctého března zažila pražská židovská obec mimořádnou událost. Ve Staronové synagoze byly zasvěceny nové synagogální textilie navržené a darované významným americkým výtvarníkem a obdivovatelem židovské Prahy Markem Podwalem.

Novým rituálním textiliím dominuje parochet, tedy monumentální opona, zakrývající v synagoze svatostánek se schránkou na Tóru. K souboru dále patří tři pláštíky na svitky Tóry, pokrývky na pult k předčítání z Tóry a povlaky na polštářky. Textilie jsou zhotoveny z brokátu a mají bohaté výšivky s tradičními židovskými motivy.  

read on…

SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!
The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens! 
Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring. 
This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel. 
2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!

The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens!

Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring.

This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel.

2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

THERE ARE FOUR SONS. WHICH ARE YOU ON PASSOVER?
 Joseph Steinhardt’s vision of the four sons of the Passover Haggadah are highly personalized, rather than based on traditional depictions. Here the wicked son, traditionally depicted as a soldier, wears a Prussian uniform and carries a sword. The other sons: wise, simple, and the one who does not know how to ask a question.
Passover Haggadah, artist Joseph Steinhardt (1888-1940), Vienna and Berlin, 1921. Gift of Estelle Heinrich. Collection of YU Museum (2001.387)

THERE ARE FOUR SONS. WHICH ARE YOU ON PASSOVER?

Joseph Steinhardt’s vision of the four sons of the Passover Haggadah are highly personalized, rather than based on traditional depictions. Here the wicked son, traditionally depicted as a soldier, wears a Prussian uniform and carries a sword. The other sons: wise, simple, and the one who does not know how to ask a question.

Passover Haggadah, artist Joseph Steinhardt (1888-1940), Vienna and Berlin, 1921. Gift of Estelle Heinrich. Collection of YU Museum (2001.387)

LION VS BIRD! LION VS BIRD! or WHY IS IT SO RARE TO SEE A ROOSTER ON A MEDICAL DIPLOMA THESE DAYS?
This 1492 Italian diploma for a Jewish doctor is decorated with an animated confrontation between a rooster and a dog.  You can view this dazzling document in YU Museum’s current exhibition Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960, on view February 26 - August 12, 2012 @YU Museum 
  
*Photo credit: Braginsky Collection, Zurich

LION VS BIRD! LION VS BIRD! or WHY IS IT SO RARE TO SEE A ROOSTER ON A MEDICAL DIPLOMA THESE DAYS?

This 1492 Italian diploma for a Jewish doctor is decorated with an animated confrontation between a rooster and a dog.  You can view this dazzling document in YU Museum’s current exhibition Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960, on view February 26 - August 12, 2012 @YU Museum


 

*Photo credit: Braginsky Collection, Zurich

From Buzzine:THE TRUE STORY OF THE FATHER OF CHEMOTHERAPY, INSPIRATION FOR A CLASSIC FILM
By: Roslyn Bernstein
March 19, 2012

In 1940, Hollywood mogul Hal Wallis produced Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet — a biopic that starred Edward G. Robinson in the title role of scientist Paul Ehrlich (1854-1915). The film “became Hollywood’s single most important exposition of medical history,” said historian of medicine Bert Hansen, the author of Picturing Medical Progress from Pasteur to Polio. For the general public, the film “offered a remarkably rich dramatization of scientific conceptions and of the process of laboratory research and discovery.”

A pioneer in the study of cells and tissues, Ehrlich was known “as the father of chemotherapy — the treatment of illness using chemicals that selectively target disease-causing agents.” He called these chemical agents “magic bullets,” and his discovery of Salvarsan, the first of these bullets, dramatically changed the treatment of Syphilis.


Ehrlich’s story, and the stories of other prominent Jewish doctors, are featured in a modest but engaging exhibit, “Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960,” that recently opened at the Yeshiva University Museum in New York. The show, presented in collaboration with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, will be up until August 12th.  
Read the whole article at Buzzinelifestyle.com
* Image: Exterminate Flies. They spread diseases. Keep your home and yard clean. Cover your food!, OSE Poster  Printed by Paul Schöpf, Berlin 1926, with the aid of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, and distributed in Eastern Europe by OZE, Collection of YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

From Buzzine:THE TRUE STORY OF THE FATHER OF CHEMOTHERAPY, INSPIRATION FOR A CLASSIC FILM

In 1940, Hollywood mogul Hal Wallis produced Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet — a biopic that starred Edward G. Robinson in the title role of scientist Paul Ehrlich (1854-1915). The film “became Hollywood’s single most important exposition of medical history,” said historian of medicine Bert Hansen, the author of Picturing Medical Progress from Pasteur to Polio. For the general public, the film “offered a remarkably rich dramatization of scientific conceptions and of the process of laboratory research and discovery.”

A pioneer in the study of cells and tissues, Ehrlich was known “as the father of chemotherapy — the treatment of illness using chemicals that selectively target disease-causing agents.” He called these chemical agents “magic bullets,” and his discovery of Salvarsan, the first of these bullets, dramatically changed the treatment of Syphilis.

Ehrlich’s story, and the stories of other prominent Jewish doctors, are featured in a modest but engaging exhibit, “Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960,” that recently opened at the Yeshiva University Museum in New York. The show, presented in collaboration with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, will be up until August 12th. 

Read the whole article at Buzzinelifestyle.com

* Image: Exterminate Flies. They spread diseases. Keep your home and yard clean. Cover your food!, OSE Poster  Printed by Paul Schöpf, Berlin 1926, with the aid of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, and distributed in Eastern Europe by OZE, Collection of YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

WHY DOES THIS VIDEO SEEM A BIT WEIRD TO ME? - QUICK COMMENTARY FROM THE CURATOR

The following is a commentary response from YUM’s curator, and not indicative of any views held by YU Museum

Purim is a magical, entertaining, and nearly-always raucous occasion.  This seemingly adorable video starts with what seems like an interfaith reading of the scroll of Esther, but quickly morphs into a jolly, alcohol-infused romp of Hasidic men, with some subtle nods to the bottle dance from Fiddler on the Roof (where it originated… don’t kid yourself about it’s ‘authenticity’). Though this video is really adorable visually, it brings up some rather disturbing ideas:

That, in the end, to celebrate Jewishly, one should probably be Chasidic men dancing in a circle, because, after all, isn’t that the center of Judaism? What does this image say about pluralism, tolerance, and the goals for Judaism?  What does it say about a ‘Jewish’ view of and expectations for other religions and cultures? What are we supposed to think of the Buddhist monk who suddenly dons Chasidic garb—and a stereotypically large nose to boot?

That Purim is time for celebration marked by stereotypical dancing and alcohol guzzling. This is about on the mark as American vision of St. Patrick’s Day, which characterizes Irish people and Irish culture in an equally if not incredibly pernicious negative light. Some inebriation is part of Purim observance, but it is neither the center nor the point of the holiday.

The short cartoon ends with a salutation for a Happy Purim.  That’s wonderful, great, and absolutely in the spirit of the holiday. But I dare say that there are underlying images that are, at the very least, of dubious meaning, and, at worst, portray some negative stereotypes.

Thanks deborahfeldman!

Cute!

CARING IN STYLE - Amazing BCH Nurse’s Cape from VNSNY
If only nurses uniforms today looked so stylish. Like my grandmother says “they don’t make things like they used to.”  The women of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York were dedicated to helping those in need, and they did so with style. This beautiful cape is currently on display at YUM courtesy the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY). 
This cape has the initials BCH on the lapel, standing for the Bureau of Child Hygiene or Health.  The BCH was a New York City-run program for looking after mothers and children in the city’s poorest neighborhoods.  It was organized by several VNSNY leaders including VNS founder Lillian Wald, who spent her life creating programs and organizations that worked on behalf of children.  Starting in 1907, the BCH adapted the VNS approach of care and service, and by 1912 the BCH had become a model for other cities, states, and in fact the federal government’s national efforts to care for America’s poorest children. This incredible artifact hints at the fantastic impact of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York.
You can see this piece of history and learn more about the VNSNY in YUM’s exhibition Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine now on view.
Nurses Cape, 1930’s-50’s, courtesy Visiting Nurse Service of New York

CARING IN STYLE - Amazing BCH Nurse’s Cape from VNSNY

If only nurses uniforms today looked so stylish. Like my grandmother says “they don’t make things like they used to.”  The women of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York were dedicated to helping those in need, and they did so with style. This beautiful cape is currently on display at YUM courtesy the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY). 

This cape has the initials BCH on the lapel, standing for the Bureau of Child Hygiene or Health.  The BCH was a New York City-run program for looking after mothers and children in the city’s poorest neighborhoods.  It was organized by several VNSNY leaders including VNS founder Lillian Wald, who spent her life creating programs and organizations that worked on behalf of children.  Starting in 1907, the BCH adapted the VNS approach of care and service, and by 1912 the BCH had become a model for other cities, states, and in fact the federal government’s national efforts to care for America’s poorest children. This incredible artifact hints at the fantastic impact of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York.

You can see this piece of history and learn more about the VNSNY in YUM’s exhibition Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine now on view.

Nurses Cape, 1930’s-50’s, courtesy Visiting Nurse Service of New York

HEAL, YOU SHALL HEAL - FILM FROM TRAIL OF THE MAGIC BULLET

What would you do if prenatal genetic testing revealed a future of pain and suffering for your unborn child? What if your parent or grandparent refused a life-saving pacemaker? How would you deal with these life-and-death decisions? And what does Jewish tradition have to say about these issues?

This film explore these questions. You’ll hear from doctors, patients, rabbis, and ethicists who offer their unique perspectives on these real-life medical dilemmas. The lively discussion offers a window onto the rich dialogue at the intersection between medicine and Jewish tradition.

'Heal, You Shall Heal' was produced for the exhibition Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960, at YU Museum in NYC February 26 - August 12, 2012. Find out more at the Exhibition Website: yumuseum.tumblr.com/MagicBullet

Produced and Directed by Ilana Trachtman
Editor: Zelda Breenstein

Images: The Library of the Jewish Theological Seminary, Jewish Museum in Prague, the Ginsburg/ Myers Family, Tia Powell, Veer
Sponsorship for ‘Heal, You Shall Heal’ and the exhibition: Leon Levy Foundation, the David Berg Foundation, Rene and Susanne Braginsky Foundation, Anonymous, The Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey

Exhibition Curator: Josh Feinberg

Copyright Yeshiva University Museum, 2012

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