/page/23
A LITTLE CLOUDY ON THE SEDER? CUT THROUGH THE HAZE WITH THIS HAGGADAH WORD CLOUD!
Whether it’s a several-hour affair, or most of the four questions and “Gimme the matzah!,” don’t fret about having to remember the entire Passover Seder (meal) script. You always follow the Haggadah, which lays out the story, the prayers, and every other word you’ll need to reenact the Jews’ exodus from Egypt thousands of years ago.
This wonderful word cloud shows the words appearing in the Haggadah according to their frequency—the larger the word, the more frequently it appears.  The two largest words here are names for God, the largest the so-called tetragrammaton or name of God, and the other “Our God.” You can sort of see this saying “Our God is Ha’Shem” peeking out of this. 
What other messages can you find in this word cloud? 
Passover Haggadah word cloud (2012) by Jonathan Schwab, Presidential Fellow in the Office of the President, Yeshiva University
Thanks so much to YUM’s own Presidential Fellow Sasha Semach for finding this piece!

A LITTLE CLOUDY ON THE SEDER? CUT THROUGH THE HAZE WITH THIS HAGGADAH WORD CLOUD!

Whether it’s a several-hour affair, or most of the four questions and “Gimme the matzah!,” don’t fret about having to remember the entire Passover Seder (meal) script. You always follow the Haggadah, which lays out the story, the prayers, and every other word you’ll need to reenact the Jews’ exodus from Egypt thousands of years ago.

This wonderful word cloud shows the words appearing in the Haggadah according to their frequency—the larger the word, the more frequently it appears.  The two largest words here are names for God, the largest the so-called tetragrammaton or name of God, and the other “Our God.” You can sort of see this saying “Our God is Ha’Shem” peeking out of this. 

What other messages can you find in this word cloud? 

Passover Haggadah word cloud (2012) by Jonathan Schwab, Presidential Fellow in the Office of the President, Yeshiva University

Thanks so much to YUM’s own Presidential Fellow Sasha Semach for finding this piece!

FROM NY DAILY NEWS: DON’T PASS OVER YUM’S GREAT EXHIBITIONS!
Revisit your Jewish roots with 3 major exhibits at the Yeshiva University Museum
Explore ‘Confessional Comics,’ ‘Modern Medicine’ and ‘Silk Stones’
By Gina Salamone / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
What better way to celebrate Passover than to rediscover your roots?
The Yeshiva University Museum is compact enough to cover in a few hours, yet diverse enough to take in a broad range of Jewish art and culture.
Read more at the New York Daily News website

Large Image: This microscope, now on display at Yeshiva, was presented to Paul Ehrlich after he received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1908 (Jefferson Siegel/for New York Daily News).


Inset: Jacob Wisse, director of the Yeshiva University Museum, in front of a display of Passover Seder plates (Jefferson Siegel/for New York Daily News).

FROM NY DAILY NEWS: DON’T PASS OVER YUM’S GREAT EXHIBITIONS!

Revisit your Jewish roots with 3 major exhibits at the Yeshiva University Museum

Explore ‘Confessional Comics,’ ‘Modern Medicine’ and ‘Silk Stones’

By / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

What better way to celebrate Passover than to rediscover your roots?

The Yeshiva University Museum is compact enough to cover in a few hours, yet diverse enough to take in a broad range of Jewish art and culture.

Large Image: This microscope, now on display at Yeshiva, was presented to Paul Ehrlich after he received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1908 (Jefferson Siegel/for New York Daily News).
Inset: Jacob Wisse, director of the Yeshiva University Museum, in front of a display of Passover Seder plates (Jefferson Siegel/for New York Daily News).


WIN $100 IN YU MUSEUM SURVEY (US ONLY)


YU Museum is seeking your opinion about a major new exhibition under development, “Let These People Go: American Activism to Free Soviet Jewry.” We’ve put together survey (5 minutes to complete!) which will help us shape the exhibition. You can fill it out at http://www.surveymonkey.com/YUMuseum.

To express our appreciation, you’ll be entered into a drawing to win a $100 American Express Gift Card. You’ll need to enter your contact info for the drawing, but it won’t be associated with your responses.

About the Exhibition:

The American Jewish Historical Society and the Yeshiva University Museum, partners at the Center for Jewish History in New York City, are planning a major exhibition titled “Let These People Go: American Activism to Free Soviet Jewry.”

From the early 1960s until the end of the Cold War in 1991, ordinary American citizens mobilized the Jewish community, the American public, and the United States government to demand the open emigration of Jews from the Soviet Union. Soviet Jews were a discriminated minority — not allowed to fully assimilate, but forbidden from leaving. Through relentless grassroots activism across the United States, their plight became a central American concern and a major issue of contention between the superpowers.

The exhibit shows that the struggle to free Soviet Jewry was a fundamentally American story about how a minority community, concerned about its brethren abroad, used this country’s tradition of collective action to affect change. Using video, news coverage, photos, artifacts (bracelets, gum wrappers, jewelry), posters, first person narrative, letters and TV clips, the exhibition will point to how this struggle connected to and drew inspiration from other contemporary social movements, among them the civil rights movement, women’s rights movement, other ethnic struggles, and the anti-Apartheid cause.

And like these other stories, the exhibition will demonstrate that the struggle for Soviet Jewry ultimately had far wider implications than the immediate goal of freeing two million Soviet Jews — for by fighting to make an issue of the plight of an oppressed minority, the movement to free Soviet Jewry elevated human rights to a central concern of American foreign policy, and left us with a moral legacy we still feel today.

PASSOVER STARTS FRIDAY NIGHT? SWEET!
Passover may not be a holiday known for its cakes—since one doesn’t eat bread while observing Passover—but it does have certain, special deserts: chocolate covered matzah, jellies, marshmallows, toffee, and more. This box held special, kosher-for-passover chocolates—meaning they came from a facility special cleaned and prepared to produce food without any of the foods forbidden during the passover holiday.
Barton’s Container for Passover chocolates, ca. 1949. Tin. Gift of Sylvia A. Herskowitz. Collection of YU Museum (1993.061)

PASSOVER STARTS FRIDAY NIGHT? SWEET!

Passover may not be a holiday known for its cakes—since one doesn’t eat bread while observing Passover—but it does have certain, special deserts: chocolate covered matzah, jellies, marshmallows, toffee, and more. This box held special, kosher-for-passover chocolates—meaning they came from a facility special cleaned and prepared to produce food without any of the foods forbidden during the passover holiday.

Barton’s Container for Passover chocolates, ca. 1949. Tin. Gift of Sylvia A. Herskowitz. Collection of YU Museum (1993.061)

PASSOVER IS JUST A WEEK AWAY! DO YOU HAVE YOUR SEDER PLATE READY?
Though this piece was created in a contemporary style out of a material new in its day, it recalls traditional German pewter Seder plates inscribed with a star motif and figures from the Passover story.
Seder Plate. Artist: Haim ben-David Schwed Munich, 1924 Stainless steel: Niello Collection of YU Museum (2001.176)

PASSOVER IS JUST A WEEK AWAY! DO YOU HAVE YOUR SEDER PLATE READY?

Though this piece was created in a contemporary style out of a material new in its day, it recalls traditional German pewter Seder plates inscribed with a star motif and figures from the Passover story.

Seder Plate. Artist: Haim ben-David Schwed Munich, 1924 Stainless steel: Niello Collection of YU Museum (2001.176)

OH, YEAH, SURE, JUST A PASSOVER SHOW TOWEL
Have you ever covered a towel so that people wouldn’t see that it was used?  Probably not.  However, doing just that was a regional Alsatian practice where people would hang a towel near the front door so that guests could wash as they entered—and not after entering.  Yet, hanging a dirty rag outside the entrance of a home would certainly not do!  Instead, they hid the soiled towel with an embroidered towel. Alsatian Jews adapted this practice, and used a decorative towel to hide the soiled towel actually used during the hand-washing ritual of the Passover Seder.
Passover Seder show towel (Sederwehl), Probably Alsace, ca. 1830. Linen:  painted. Collection of YU Museum collection (2006.231).

OH, YEAH, SURE, JUST A PASSOVER SHOW TOWEL

Have you ever covered a towel so that people wouldn’t see that it was used?  Probably not.  However, doing just that was a regional Alsatian practice where people would hang a towel near the front door so that guests could wash as they entered—and not after entering.  Yet, hanging a dirty rag outside the entrance of a home would certainly not do!  Instead, they hid the soiled towel with an embroidered towel. Alsatian Jews adapted this practice, and used a decorative towel to hide the soiled towel actually used during the hand-washing ritual of the Passover Seder.

Passover Seder show towel (Sederwehl), Probably Alsace, ca. 1830. Linen:  painted. Collection of YU Museum collection (2006.231).

WHAT SEDER PLATE ARE YOU GOING TO USE? SOMETHING IRIDESCENT I HOPE!
Does this remind you of an oyster? Many Jews who took the cure at Karlsbad, an incredible spa town a few hours from Prague, took home souvenir Seder plates resembling contemporary oyster plates in their basic form.
Seder Plate, Paul Kuechler, Karlsbad, Bohemia, early 20th century. Collection of YU Museum (2003.063).

WHAT SEDER PLATE ARE YOU GOING TO USE? SOMETHING IRIDESCENT I HOPE!

Does this remind you of an oyster? Many Jews who took the cure at Karlsbad, an incredible spa town a few hours from Prague, took home souvenir Seder plates resembling contemporary oyster plates in their basic form.

Seder Plate, Paul Kuechler, Karlsbad, Bohemia, early 20th century. Collection of YU Museum (2003.063).

* Foto: © Židovské muzeum v Praze 
MARK PODWAL’S TORAH ARK CURTAIN INSTALLED  IN ALTNEUSCHUL IN PRAGUE 
If you missed YUM’s presentation of Mark Podwal’s new textiles for the Altneuschul in Prague, you can still see the pieces… in Prague!  The following article (in Czech) discusses the pieces, their installation, and their significance.  
And check out the short video produced by curator Zachary Paul Levine on the development of these textiles at YUM’s Vimeo page: https://vimeo.com/34334552
Here’s the article:
Výtvarník Marek Podwal daroval Staronové synagoze nové synagogální textilie
Patnáctého března zažila pražská židovská obec mimořádnou událost. Ve Staronové synagoze byly zasvěceny nové synagogální textilie navržené a darované významným americkým výtvarníkem a obdivovatelem židovské Prahy Markem Podwalem.
Novým rituálním textiliím dominuje parochet, tedy monumentální opona, zakrývající v synagoze svatostánek se schránkou na Tóru. K souboru dále patří tři pláštíky na svitky Tóry, pokrývky na pult k předčítání z Tóry a povlaky na polštářky. Textilie jsou zhotoveny z brokátu a mají bohaté výšivky s tradičními židovskými motivy.  
read on…

* Foto: © Židovské muzeum v Praze

MARK PODWAL’S TORAH ARK CURTAIN INSTALLED  IN ALTNEUSCHUL IN PRAGUE

If you missed YUM’s presentation of Mark Podwal’s new textiles for the Altneuschul in Prague, you can still see the pieces… in Prague!  The following article (in Czech) discusses the pieces, their installation, and their significance. 

And check out the short video produced by curator Zachary Paul Levine on the development of these textiles at YUM’s Vimeo page: https://vimeo.com/34334552

Here’s the article:

Výtvarník Marek Podwal daroval Staronové synagoze nové synagogální textilie

Patnáctého března zažila pražská židovská obec mimořádnou událost. Ve Staronové synagoze byly zasvěceny nové synagogální textilie navržené a darované významným americkým výtvarníkem a obdivovatelem židovské Prahy Markem Podwalem.

Novým rituálním textiliím dominuje parochet, tedy monumentální opona, zakrývající v synagoze svatostánek se schránkou na Tóru. K souboru dále patří tři pláštíky na svitky Tóry, pokrývky na pult k předčítání z Tóry a povlaky na polštářky. Textilie jsou zhotoveny z brokátu a mají bohaté výšivky s tradičními židovskými motivy.  

read on…

SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!
The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens! 
Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring. 
This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel. 
2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!

The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens!

Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring.

This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel.

2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

THERE ARE FOUR SONS. WHICH ARE YOU ON PASSOVER?
 Joseph Steinhardt’s vision of the four sons of the Passover Haggadah are highly personalized, rather than based on traditional depictions. Here the wicked son, traditionally depicted as a soldier, wears a Prussian uniform and carries a sword. The other sons: wise, simple, and the one who does not know how to ask a question.
Passover Haggadah, artist Joseph Steinhardt (1888-1940), Vienna and Berlin, 1921. Gift of Estelle Heinrich. Collection of YU Museum (2001.387)

THERE ARE FOUR SONS. WHICH ARE YOU ON PASSOVER?

Joseph Steinhardt’s vision of the four sons of the Passover Haggadah are highly personalized, rather than based on traditional depictions. Here the wicked son, traditionally depicted as a soldier, wears a Prussian uniform and carries a sword. The other sons: wise, simple, and the one who does not know how to ask a question.

Passover Haggadah, artist Joseph Steinhardt (1888-1940), Vienna and Berlin, 1921. Gift of Estelle Heinrich. Collection of YU Museum (2001.387)

A LITTLE CLOUDY ON THE SEDER? CUT THROUGH THE HAZE WITH THIS HAGGADAH WORD CLOUD!
Whether it’s a several-hour affair, or most of the four questions and “Gimme the matzah!,” don’t fret about having to remember the entire Passover Seder (meal) script. You always follow the Haggadah, which lays out the story, the prayers, and every other word you’ll need to reenact the Jews’ exodus from Egypt thousands of years ago.
This wonderful word cloud shows the words appearing in the Haggadah according to their frequency—the larger the word, the more frequently it appears.  The two largest words here are names for God, the largest the so-called tetragrammaton or name of God, and the other “Our God.” You can sort of see this saying “Our God is Ha’Shem” peeking out of this. 
What other messages can you find in this word cloud? 
Passover Haggadah word cloud (2012) by Jonathan Schwab, Presidential Fellow in the Office of the President, Yeshiva University
Thanks so much to YUM’s own Presidential Fellow Sasha Semach for finding this piece!

A LITTLE CLOUDY ON THE SEDER? CUT THROUGH THE HAZE WITH THIS HAGGADAH WORD CLOUD!

Whether it’s a several-hour affair, or most of the four questions and “Gimme the matzah!,” don’t fret about having to remember the entire Passover Seder (meal) script. You always follow the Haggadah, which lays out the story, the prayers, and every other word you’ll need to reenact the Jews’ exodus from Egypt thousands of years ago.

This wonderful word cloud shows the words appearing in the Haggadah according to their frequency—the larger the word, the more frequently it appears.  The two largest words here are names for God, the largest the so-called tetragrammaton or name of God, and the other “Our God.” You can sort of see this saying “Our God is Ha’Shem” peeking out of this. 

What other messages can you find in this word cloud? 

Passover Haggadah word cloud (2012) by Jonathan Schwab, Presidential Fellow in the Office of the President, Yeshiva University

Thanks so much to YUM’s own Presidential Fellow Sasha Semach for finding this piece!

FROM NY DAILY NEWS: DON’T PASS OVER YUM’S GREAT EXHIBITIONS!
Revisit your Jewish roots with 3 major exhibits at the Yeshiva University Museum
Explore ‘Confessional Comics,’ ‘Modern Medicine’ and ‘Silk Stones’
By Gina Salamone / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
What better way to celebrate Passover than to rediscover your roots?
The Yeshiva University Museum is compact enough to cover in a few hours, yet diverse enough to take in a broad range of Jewish art and culture.
Read more at the New York Daily News website

Large Image: This microscope, now on display at Yeshiva, was presented to Paul Ehrlich after he received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1908 (Jefferson Siegel/for New York Daily News).


Inset: Jacob Wisse, director of the Yeshiva University Museum, in front of a display of Passover Seder plates (Jefferson Siegel/for New York Daily News).

FROM NY DAILY NEWS: DON’T PASS OVER YUM’S GREAT EXHIBITIONS!

Revisit your Jewish roots with 3 major exhibits at the Yeshiva University Museum

Explore ‘Confessional Comics,’ ‘Modern Medicine’ and ‘Silk Stones’

By / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

What better way to celebrate Passover than to rediscover your roots?

The Yeshiva University Museum is compact enough to cover in a few hours, yet diverse enough to take in a broad range of Jewish art and culture.

Large Image: This microscope, now on display at Yeshiva, was presented to Paul Ehrlich after he received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1908 (Jefferson Siegel/for New York Daily News).
Inset: Jacob Wisse, director of the Yeshiva University Museum, in front of a display of Passover Seder plates (Jefferson Siegel/for New York Daily News).


WIN $100 IN YU MUSEUM SURVEY (US ONLY)


YU Museum is seeking your opinion about a major new exhibition under development, “Let These People Go: American Activism to Free Soviet Jewry.” We’ve put together survey (5 minutes to complete!) which will help us shape the exhibition. You can fill it out at http://www.surveymonkey.com/YUMuseum.

To express our appreciation, you’ll be entered into a drawing to win a $100 American Express Gift Card. You’ll need to enter your contact info for the drawing, but it won’t be associated with your responses.

About the Exhibition:

The American Jewish Historical Society and the Yeshiva University Museum, partners at the Center for Jewish History in New York City, are planning a major exhibition titled “Let These People Go: American Activism to Free Soviet Jewry.”

From the early 1960s until the end of the Cold War in 1991, ordinary American citizens mobilized the Jewish community, the American public, and the United States government to demand the open emigration of Jews from the Soviet Union. Soviet Jews were a discriminated minority — not allowed to fully assimilate, but forbidden from leaving. Through relentless grassroots activism across the United States, their plight became a central American concern and a major issue of contention between the superpowers.

The exhibit shows that the struggle to free Soviet Jewry was a fundamentally American story about how a minority community, concerned about its brethren abroad, used this country’s tradition of collective action to affect change. Using video, news coverage, photos, artifacts (bracelets, gum wrappers, jewelry), posters, first person narrative, letters and TV clips, the exhibition will point to how this struggle connected to and drew inspiration from other contemporary social movements, among them the civil rights movement, women’s rights movement, other ethnic struggles, and the anti-Apartheid cause.

And like these other stories, the exhibition will demonstrate that the struggle for Soviet Jewry ultimately had far wider implications than the immediate goal of freeing two million Soviet Jews — for by fighting to make an issue of the plight of an oppressed minority, the movement to free Soviet Jewry elevated human rights to a central concern of American foreign policy, and left us with a moral legacy we still feel today.

PASSOVER STARTS FRIDAY NIGHT? SWEET!
Passover may not be a holiday known for its cakes—since one doesn’t eat bread while observing Passover—but it does have certain, special deserts: chocolate covered matzah, jellies, marshmallows, toffee, and more. This box held special, kosher-for-passover chocolates—meaning they came from a facility special cleaned and prepared to produce food without any of the foods forbidden during the passover holiday.
Barton’s Container for Passover chocolates, ca. 1949. Tin. Gift of Sylvia A. Herskowitz. Collection of YU Museum (1993.061)

PASSOVER STARTS FRIDAY NIGHT? SWEET!

Passover may not be a holiday known for its cakes—since one doesn’t eat bread while observing Passover—but it does have certain, special deserts: chocolate covered matzah, jellies, marshmallows, toffee, and more. This box held special, kosher-for-passover chocolates—meaning they came from a facility special cleaned and prepared to produce food without any of the foods forbidden during the passover holiday.

Barton’s Container for Passover chocolates, ca. 1949. Tin. Gift of Sylvia A. Herskowitz. Collection of YU Museum (1993.061)

PASSOVER IS JUST A WEEK AWAY! DO YOU HAVE YOUR SEDER PLATE READY?
Though this piece was created in a contemporary style out of a material new in its day, it recalls traditional German pewter Seder plates inscribed with a star motif and figures from the Passover story.
Seder Plate. Artist: Haim ben-David Schwed Munich, 1924 Stainless steel: Niello Collection of YU Museum (2001.176)

PASSOVER IS JUST A WEEK AWAY! DO YOU HAVE YOUR SEDER PLATE READY?

Though this piece was created in a contemporary style out of a material new in its day, it recalls traditional German pewter Seder plates inscribed with a star motif and figures from the Passover story.

Seder Plate. Artist: Haim ben-David Schwed Munich, 1924 Stainless steel: Niello Collection of YU Museum (2001.176)

OH, YEAH, SURE, JUST A PASSOVER SHOW TOWEL
Have you ever covered a towel so that people wouldn’t see that it was used?  Probably not.  However, doing just that was a regional Alsatian practice where people would hang a towel near the front door so that guests could wash as they entered—and not after entering.  Yet, hanging a dirty rag outside the entrance of a home would certainly not do!  Instead, they hid the soiled towel with an embroidered towel. Alsatian Jews adapted this practice, and used a decorative towel to hide the soiled towel actually used during the hand-washing ritual of the Passover Seder.
Passover Seder show towel (Sederwehl), Probably Alsace, ca. 1830. Linen:  painted. Collection of YU Museum collection (2006.231).

OH, YEAH, SURE, JUST A PASSOVER SHOW TOWEL

Have you ever covered a towel so that people wouldn’t see that it was used?  Probably not.  However, doing just that was a regional Alsatian practice where people would hang a towel near the front door so that guests could wash as they entered—and not after entering.  Yet, hanging a dirty rag outside the entrance of a home would certainly not do!  Instead, they hid the soiled towel with an embroidered towel. Alsatian Jews adapted this practice, and used a decorative towel to hide the soiled towel actually used during the hand-washing ritual of the Passover Seder.

Passover Seder show towel (Sederwehl), Probably Alsace, ca. 1830. Linen:  painted. Collection of YU Museum collection (2006.231).

WHAT SEDER PLATE ARE YOU GOING TO USE? SOMETHING IRIDESCENT I HOPE!
Does this remind you of an oyster? Many Jews who took the cure at Karlsbad, an incredible spa town a few hours from Prague, took home souvenir Seder plates resembling contemporary oyster plates in their basic form.
Seder Plate, Paul Kuechler, Karlsbad, Bohemia, early 20th century. Collection of YU Museum (2003.063).

WHAT SEDER PLATE ARE YOU GOING TO USE? SOMETHING IRIDESCENT I HOPE!

Does this remind you of an oyster? Many Jews who took the cure at Karlsbad, an incredible spa town a few hours from Prague, took home souvenir Seder plates resembling contemporary oyster plates in their basic form.

Seder Plate, Paul Kuechler, Karlsbad, Bohemia, early 20th century. Collection of YU Museum (2003.063).

* Foto: © Židovské muzeum v Praze 
MARK PODWAL’S TORAH ARK CURTAIN INSTALLED  IN ALTNEUSCHUL IN PRAGUE 
If you missed YUM’s presentation of Mark Podwal’s new textiles for the Altneuschul in Prague, you can still see the pieces… in Prague!  The following article (in Czech) discusses the pieces, their installation, and their significance.  
And check out the short video produced by curator Zachary Paul Levine on the development of these textiles at YUM’s Vimeo page: https://vimeo.com/34334552
Here’s the article:
Výtvarník Marek Podwal daroval Staronové synagoze nové synagogální textilie
Patnáctého března zažila pražská židovská obec mimořádnou událost. Ve Staronové synagoze byly zasvěceny nové synagogální textilie navržené a darované významným americkým výtvarníkem a obdivovatelem židovské Prahy Markem Podwalem.
Novým rituálním textiliím dominuje parochet, tedy monumentální opona, zakrývající v synagoze svatostánek se schránkou na Tóru. K souboru dále patří tři pláštíky na svitky Tóry, pokrývky na pult k předčítání z Tóry a povlaky na polštářky. Textilie jsou zhotoveny z brokátu a mají bohaté výšivky s tradičními židovskými motivy.  
read on…

* Foto: © Židovské muzeum v Praze

MARK PODWAL’S TORAH ARK CURTAIN INSTALLED  IN ALTNEUSCHUL IN PRAGUE

If you missed YUM’s presentation of Mark Podwal’s new textiles for the Altneuschul in Prague, you can still see the pieces… in Prague!  The following article (in Czech) discusses the pieces, their installation, and their significance. 

And check out the short video produced by curator Zachary Paul Levine on the development of these textiles at YUM’s Vimeo page: https://vimeo.com/34334552

Here’s the article:

Výtvarník Marek Podwal daroval Staronové synagoze nové synagogální textilie

Patnáctého března zažila pražská židovská obec mimořádnou událost. Ve Staronové synagoze byly zasvěceny nové synagogální textilie navržené a darované významným americkým výtvarníkem a obdivovatelem židovské Prahy Markem Podwalem.

Novým rituálním textiliím dominuje parochet, tedy monumentální opona, zakrývající v synagoze svatostánek se schránkou na Tóru. K souboru dále patří tři pláštíky na svitky Tóry, pokrývky na pult k předčítání z Tóry a povlaky na polštářky. Textilie jsou zhotoveny z brokátu a mají bohaté výšivky s tradičními židovskými motivy.  

read on…

SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!
The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens! 
Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring. 
This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel. 
2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!

The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens!

Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring.

This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel.

2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

THERE ARE FOUR SONS. WHICH ARE YOU ON PASSOVER?
 Joseph Steinhardt’s vision of the four sons of the Passover Haggadah are highly personalized, rather than based on traditional depictions. Here the wicked son, traditionally depicted as a soldier, wears a Prussian uniform and carries a sword. The other sons: wise, simple, and the one who does not know how to ask a question.
Passover Haggadah, artist Joseph Steinhardt (1888-1940), Vienna and Berlin, 1921. Gift of Estelle Heinrich. Collection of YU Museum (2001.387)

THERE ARE FOUR SONS. WHICH ARE YOU ON PASSOVER?

Joseph Steinhardt’s vision of the four sons of the Passover Haggadah are highly personalized, rather than based on traditional depictions. Here the wicked son, traditionally depicted as a soldier, wears a Prussian uniform and carries a sword. The other sons: wise, simple, and the one who does not know how to ask a question.

Passover Haggadah, artist Joseph Steinhardt (1888-1940), Vienna and Berlin, 1921. Gift of Estelle Heinrich. Collection of YU Museum (2001.387)

About:

YU Museum creates new ways to experience and interpret Jewish art and history. It is a source for new ideas and perspectives on historic events and cultural phenomena effecting everyone.

Visit YU Museum’s exhibitions and programs! They open the eyes of audiences to new perspectives on Jewish culture, historic events and cultural phenomena. They reveal the vitality and resonance of present-day art on Jewish themes, and reflect and re-interpret millennia of Jewish experiences for the present. Visit: @15 w16th st, NYC

Visit YU Museum @ www.YUMuseum.org

Following: