/page/6
CHILLY? MAYBE TIME TO GET A NEW COAT
Well, if it were about 100 years ago, you might have checked out  Cohen and Edelman, a clothier offering cutting edge styles … for the time.
This postcard is from one of the thousands of textile and clothing businesses established by Jewish immigrants to the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Millions of Jews migrated to here during the time, large numbers destined for New York city, where, famously (or infamously) they worked in the garment industry doing everything from sewing and cutting, to designing and selling. 
Most of the businesses are long gone today, remembered in the few fading painted signs on old building around Manhattan, or in postcards like this one.
Postcard for Cohen & Edelman, New York, U.S.A.,1920, (YUM: 2005.030)

CHILLY? MAYBE TIME TO GET A NEW COAT

Well, if it were about 100 years ago, you might have checked out  Cohen and Edelman, a clothier offering cutting edge styles … for the time.

This postcard is from one of the thousands of textile and clothing businesses established by Jewish immigrants to the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Millions of Jews migrated to here during the time, large numbers destined for New York city, where, famously (or infamously) they worked in the garment industry doing everything from sewing and cutting, to designing and selling. 

Most of the businesses are long gone today, remembered in the few fading painted signs on old building around Manhattan, or in postcards like this one.

Postcard for Cohen & Edelman, New York, U.S.A.,1920, (YUM: 2005.030)

OTTO-MATIC … MATHIC … 
Jews and Math?  Is there a connection?  Take Otto Blumenthal (above) as one point of inquiry, and visit YUMuseum’s newest exhibition Transcending Tradition: Jewish Mathematicians in German-Speaking Academic Culture. You can find out more at the exhibition’s page here. 
So who is this guy? Otto Blumenthal (1876-1944), a PhD student of famed mathematician David Hilbert, was Professor in Aachen from 1905 until1933. He was managing editor of Mathematische Annalen from 1905 to 1938, and from 1924 editor of the annual report of the German Mathematical Society.  
In July 1939 Blumenthal fled to the Netherlands. In the same year his name disappeared from the cover of the Mathematischen Annalen. Following the German occupation of the Netherlands, Blumenthal fell into the hands of the Nazis. He died in the Theresienstadt concentration camp in 1944.

OTTO-MATIC … MATHIC … 

Jews and Math?  Is there a connection?  Take Otto Blumenthal (above) as one point of inquiry, and visit YUMuseum’s newest exhibition Transcending Tradition: Jewish Mathematicians in German-Speaking Academic Culture. You can find out more at the exhibition’s page here. 

So who is this guy? Otto Blumenthal (1876-1944), a PhD student of famed mathematician David Hilbert, was Professor in Aachen from 1905 until1933. He was managing editor of Mathematische Annalen from 1905 to 1938, and from 1924 editor of the annual report of the German Mathematical Society.  

In July 1939 Blumenthal fled to the Netherlands. In the same year his name disappeared from the cover of the Mathematischen Annalen. Following the German occupation of the Netherlands, Blumenthal fell into the hands of the Nazis. He died in the Theresienstadt concentration camp in 1944.

 THIS NEW YEAR, SAY IT LOVE
Love letter?  Greeting card?  Learn more at YUM’s new online exhibition on Jewish Dating on YUM’s Flickr.
Shana Tova everybody! 
Happy New Year, Williamsburg Art Co., New York, circa 1910/1915, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1992.178

THIS NEW YEAR, SAY IT LOVE

Love letter?  Greeting card?  Learn more at YUM’s new online exhibition on Jewish Dating on YUM’s Flickr.

Shana Tova everybody! 

Happy New Year, Williamsburg Art Co., New York, circa 1910/1915, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1992.178

SHANA TOVA! SAY IT WIRELESSLY! 
Happy New Year everybody!  Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, starts September 4th.  YU Museum wishes you a happy and healthy new year full of good fortune. 
New Years Postcard, Printed in Germany by Verlag “Central” (YUM Acc Number 2003.56)

SHANA TOVA! SAY IT WIRELESSLY! 

Happy New Year everybody!  Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, starts September 4th.  YU Museum wishes you a happy and healthy new year full of good fortune. 

New Years Postcard, Printed in Germany by Verlag “Central” (YUM Acc Number 2003.56)

AUGUSTUS.  AUGUST ALL OF US! - ULTIMATE THROWBOACK #TBT
Happy August everybody (and throwback Thursday)!  This lovely summer month is named after the Emperor of Rome in the first century C.E.—Augustus.  Can you say “throwback”?  Augustus had respect for the Jews in Judea and their ruler, Herod.
The fragment of a cup bottom with Jewish symbols from Rome circa 300-350 C.E. shines with menorahs, a shofar, a lulav, and an open Torah ark with scrolls inside.  The design is a potpourri of Jewish symbols still known and used today.  The thick and solid structure of this object is representative of Judaism’s resilience.  The fragmentation of this cup bottom is symbolic of Judaism.  As this cup has survived thousands of years, so have the Jews.   
So while you’re probably sipping from a cup that looks nothing like this, remember that there’s a chance your Judaism has come from ancient Rome — aka has survived A LONG time, even dating back to a time when our calendar months were being named!  #tbt

Fragment of a Cup bottom with Jewish symbols, Rome, gold glass, fragment, ca. 300-350 C.E.

AUGUSTUS.  AUGUST ALL OF US! - ULTIMATE THROWBOACK #TBT

Happy August everybody (and throwback Thursday)!  This lovely summer month is named after the Emperor of Rome in the first century C.E.—Augustus.  Can you say “throwback”?  Augustus had respect for the Jews in Judea and their ruler, Herod.

The fragment of a cup bottom with Jewish symbols from Rome circa 300-350 C.E. shines with menorahs, a shofar, a lulav, and an open Torah ark with scrolls inside.  The design is a potpourri of Jewish symbols still known and used today.  The thick and solid structure of this object is representative of Judaism’s resilience.  The fragmentation of this cup bottom is symbolic of Judaism.  As this cup has survived thousands of years, so have the Jews.   

So while you’re probably sipping from a cup that looks nothing like this, remember that there’s a chance your Judaism has come from ancient Rome — aka has survived A LONG time, even dating back to a time when our calendar months were being named!  #tbt

Fragment of a Cup bottom with Jewish symbols, Rome, gold glass, fragment, ca. 300-350 C.E.

Anybody can date Jewish, but not everybody can Jewish-date.
Think you know what it takes?
One of our summer interns put together this fantastic online exhibition on the unique practice of Dating Jewishly. Check it out at YUM’s Flickr site. 

Anybody can date Jewish, but not everybody can Jewish-date.

Think you know what it takes?

One of our summer interns put together this fantastic online exhibition on the unique practice of Dating Jewishly. Check it out at YUM’s Flickr site

THIS IS A HAT THAT SAYS DAVID
The election for Israel’s chief rabbi the other day was pitted as a “knitted kipah” vs a “black hat.” Incidentally, the black hat candidate won, but his name is in fact David. Maybe he can wear it under his hat.
Kippot (sing. kippah), or skullcaps, can be used as a form of religious identification. This type of skullcap is known as a kippah sruga, or knit skullcap, and, in many communities around the world and especially in israel, can identify its wearer with national-religious politics, or Modern-Orthodox denomination (though the two are mutually exclusive). In contrast, a black kippah often identifies its wearer as leaning more towards ultra-orthodoxy.
Knitting a skullcap for a male acquaintance can also be one of few socially acceptable (unofficial) ways for an Orthodox woman to court a man.
Skullcap, 20th Century Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1991.106

THIS IS A HAT THAT SAYS DAVID

The election for Israel’s chief rabbi the other day was pitted as a “knitted kipah” vs a “black hat.” Incidentally, the black hat candidate won, but his name is in fact David. Maybe he can wear it under his hat.

Kippot (sing. kippah), or skullcaps, can be used as a form of religious identification. This type of skullcap is known as a kippah sruga, or knit skullcap, and, in many communities around the world and especially in israel, can identify its wearer with national-religious politics, or Modern-Orthodox denomination (though the two are mutually exclusive). In contrast, a black kippah often identifies its wearer as leaning more towards ultra-orthodoxy.

Knitting a skullcap for a male acquaintance can also be one of few socially acceptable (unofficial) ways for an Orthodox woman to court a man.

Skullcap, 20th Century
Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1991.106

LET THE GAMES BEGIN!!! 

On Thursday, a record number of Jewish and Israeli athletes entered Jerusalem for the opening ceremony of one of the world’s largest sporting events, the 19th Maccabiah Games, with 9,000 athletes.

Whoever excels at their particular sport just might go home with a medal like the one shown above. This is a medal from the 11th Maccabiah Games of July 1981.  On one side, four athletes, three males and one female, strike athletic poses. On the other, it looks as though all the athletes on the opposite side have blended into a mass of overlapping lines in motion.  The futuristic style of writing and design perhaps symbolize continuity and conjoining of all Jews, regardless of nationality—coming together at these games to show not only physical strength, but communal strength as well.

Brad Gilbert, a top Jewish tennis player in the 1980s, took home a Men’s Doubles gold medal from these 1981 Maccabiah Games!  You may hear him as a commentator during the US Open this summer.

11th Maccabiah Official Award Medal, brass, cast, 1981, Yeshiva University Museum Collection, 2009.388

AN ARTIST WHO CREATES LANGUAGE TO MAKE ART

YUM’s curator visits the studio of R. Justin Stewart, the artist who created extruded (an eruv project) which is currently on view in It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and BeyondFollow him at zcurator.tumblr.com

AN ARTIST WHO CREATES LANGUAGE TO MAKE ART

A few months ago I discussed the possibility of accessioning a monumental piece by an artist composed of thousands of strings hanging from a ceiling.  Unfortunately my institution would not be able to store this piece, so we talked about accessioning instructions for making the piece … as the piece itself (a la Sol Lewitt I suppose). I recently visited this artist’s studio to find that much of his work is rooted in constructing a language to create pieces — so much so that the creation of language becomes part of the art-making act. 

Brooklyn artist R. Justin Stewart’s studio is dominated by a grid of framed, wordless drawings that appear to be pages ripped from an instruction manual, but which give no obvious image of what the end product might be.  Some of these drawings include circles and other shapes, linked together by small symbols akin to nautical flags, themselves “linked” via red tape lines on the wall, with other drawings present neatly organized shapes and rows of varying-sized circles.  Initially, they struck me as simple, easy to follow instructions for not much of anything, which were meant collectively as a jab at the seemingly simple but occasionally dumbfounding directions for Ikea furniture.

Then Stewart presented a sculpture that looked like an enlarged undersea creature, a spiky bioflorescent organism that lives miles under the sea. It was a structure composed of plastic o-rings held together with hundreds of zip ties. This piece, systems of knowing 03, which included the sculpture and the drawings, revolve around the question of how to communicate instructions for constructing a structure.  

Suddenly Stewart’s language became clear.  The drawings were step-by-step guides to building the sculpture.  The colorful symbols represented actions and material elements, and they appeared on drawings that illustrate how to compile different segments.  Other drawings showed finished segments and sub-segments, all leading to the final sculpture.  Where, moments earlier, I thought I was looking at images and symbols that were purposely meaningless, I could only see a rational syntax for construction. 

I like Stewart’s work aesthetically and conceptually.  He presents large quantities of data in coherent, playful, and seemingly circuitous forms.  However, for me, their greatest impact is that moment when they become clear, when they yield that wonderful moment of epiphany. And that moment emerges not only — and perhaps not primarily — from the encounter with the physical piece, but from a sudden and surprising clarification in the language of the piece.  It’s like suddenly finding yourself able to understand a language that seconds earlier sounded like gibberish

CHILLY? MAYBE TIME TO GET A NEW COAT
Well, if it were about 100 years ago, you might have checked out  Cohen and Edelman, a clothier offering cutting edge styles … for the time.
This postcard is from one of the thousands of textile and clothing businesses established by Jewish immigrants to the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Millions of Jews migrated to here during the time, large numbers destined for New York city, where, famously (or infamously) they worked in the garment industry doing everything from sewing and cutting, to designing and selling. 
Most of the businesses are long gone today, remembered in the few fading painted signs on old building around Manhattan, or in postcards like this one.
Postcard for Cohen & Edelman, New York, U.S.A.,1920, (YUM: 2005.030)

CHILLY? MAYBE TIME TO GET A NEW COAT

Well, if it were about 100 years ago, you might have checked out  Cohen and Edelman, a clothier offering cutting edge styles … for the time.

This postcard is from one of the thousands of textile and clothing businesses established by Jewish immigrants to the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Millions of Jews migrated to here during the time, large numbers destined for New York city, where, famously (or infamously) they worked in the garment industry doing everything from sewing and cutting, to designing and selling. 

Most of the businesses are long gone today, remembered in the few fading painted signs on old building around Manhattan, or in postcards like this one.

Postcard for Cohen & Edelman, New York, U.S.A.,1920, (YUM: 2005.030)

OTTO-MATIC … MATHIC … 
Jews and Math?  Is there a connection?  Take Otto Blumenthal (above) as one point of inquiry, and visit YUMuseum’s newest exhibition Transcending Tradition: Jewish Mathematicians in German-Speaking Academic Culture. You can find out more at the exhibition’s page here. 
So who is this guy? Otto Blumenthal (1876-1944), a PhD student of famed mathematician David Hilbert, was Professor in Aachen from 1905 until1933. He was managing editor of Mathematische Annalen from 1905 to 1938, and from 1924 editor of the annual report of the German Mathematical Society.  
In July 1939 Blumenthal fled to the Netherlands. In the same year his name disappeared from the cover of the Mathematischen Annalen. Following the German occupation of the Netherlands, Blumenthal fell into the hands of the Nazis. He died in the Theresienstadt concentration camp in 1944.

OTTO-MATIC … MATHIC … 

Jews and Math?  Is there a connection?  Take Otto Blumenthal (above) as one point of inquiry, and visit YUMuseum’s newest exhibition Transcending Tradition: Jewish Mathematicians in German-Speaking Academic Culture. You can find out more at the exhibition’s page here. 

So who is this guy? Otto Blumenthal (1876-1944), a PhD student of famed mathematician David Hilbert, was Professor in Aachen from 1905 until1933. He was managing editor of Mathematische Annalen from 1905 to 1938, and from 1924 editor of the annual report of the German Mathematical Society.  

In July 1939 Blumenthal fled to the Netherlands. In the same year his name disappeared from the cover of the Mathematischen Annalen. Following the German occupation of the Netherlands, Blumenthal fell into the hands of the Nazis. He died in the Theresienstadt concentration camp in 1944.

 THIS NEW YEAR, SAY IT LOVE
Love letter?  Greeting card?  Learn more at YUM’s new online exhibition on Jewish Dating on YUM’s Flickr.
Shana Tova everybody! 
Happy New Year, Williamsburg Art Co., New York, circa 1910/1915, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1992.178

THIS NEW YEAR, SAY IT LOVE

Love letter?  Greeting card?  Learn more at YUM’s new online exhibition on Jewish Dating on YUM’s Flickr.

Shana Tova everybody! 

Happy New Year, Williamsburg Art Co., New York, circa 1910/1915, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1992.178

SHANA TOVA! SAY IT WIRELESSLY! 
Happy New Year everybody!  Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, starts September 4th.  YU Museum wishes you a happy and healthy new year full of good fortune. 
New Years Postcard, Printed in Germany by Verlag “Central” (YUM Acc Number 2003.56)

SHANA TOVA! SAY IT WIRELESSLY! 

Happy New Year everybody!  Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, starts September 4th.  YU Museum wishes you a happy and healthy new year full of good fortune. 

New Years Postcard, Printed in Germany by Verlag “Central” (YUM Acc Number 2003.56)

AUGUSTUS.  AUGUST ALL OF US! - ULTIMATE THROWBOACK #TBT
Happy August everybody (and throwback Thursday)!  This lovely summer month is named after the Emperor of Rome in the first century C.E.—Augustus.  Can you say “throwback”?  Augustus had respect for the Jews in Judea and their ruler, Herod.
The fragment of a cup bottom with Jewish symbols from Rome circa 300-350 C.E. shines with menorahs, a shofar, a lulav, and an open Torah ark with scrolls inside.  The design is a potpourri of Jewish symbols still known and used today.  The thick and solid structure of this object is representative of Judaism’s resilience.  The fragmentation of this cup bottom is symbolic of Judaism.  As this cup has survived thousands of years, so have the Jews.   
So while you’re probably sipping from a cup that looks nothing like this, remember that there’s a chance your Judaism has come from ancient Rome — aka has survived A LONG time, even dating back to a time when our calendar months were being named!  #tbt

Fragment of a Cup bottom with Jewish symbols, Rome, gold glass, fragment, ca. 300-350 C.E.

AUGUSTUS.  AUGUST ALL OF US! - ULTIMATE THROWBOACK #TBT

Happy August everybody (and throwback Thursday)!  This lovely summer month is named after the Emperor of Rome in the first century C.E.—Augustus.  Can you say “throwback”?  Augustus had respect for the Jews in Judea and their ruler, Herod.

The fragment of a cup bottom with Jewish symbols from Rome circa 300-350 C.E. shines with menorahs, a shofar, a lulav, and an open Torah ark with scrolls inside.  The design is a potpourri of Jewish symbols still known and used today.  The thick and solid structure of this object is representative of Judaism’s resilience.  The fragmentation of this cup bottom is symbolic of Judaism.  As this cup has survived thousands of years, so have the Jews.   

So while you’re probably sipping from a cup that looks nothing like this, remember that there’s a chance your Judaism has come from ancient Rome — aka has survived A LONG time, even dating back to a time when our calendar months were being named!  #tbt

Fragment of a Cup bottom with Jewish symbols, Rome, gold glass, fragment, ca. 300-350 C.E.

Anybody can date Jewish, but not everybody can Jewish-date.
Think you know what it takes?
One of our summer interns put together this fantastic online exhibition on the unique practice of Dating Jewishly. Check it out at YUM’s Flickr site. 

Anybody can date Jewish, but not everybody can Jewish-date.

Think you know what it takes?

One of our summer interns put together this fantastic online exhibition on the unique practice of Dating Jewishly. Check it out at YUM’s Flickr site

THIS IS A HAT THAT SAYS DAVID
The election for Israel’s chief rabbi the other day was pitted as a “knitted kipah” vs a “black hat.” Incidentally, the black hat candidate won, but his name is in fact David. Maybe he can wear it under his hat.
Kippot (sing. kippah), or skullcaps, can be used as a form of religious identification. This type of skullcap is known as a kippah sruga, or knit skullcap, and, in many communities around the world and especially in israel, can identify its wearer with national-religious politics, or Modern-Orthodox denomination (though the two are mutually exclusive). In contrast, a black kippah often identifies its wearer as leaning more towards ultra-orthodoxy.
Knitting a skullcap for a male acquaintance can also be one of few socially acceptable (unofficial) ways for an Orthodox woman to court a man.
Skullcap, 20th Century Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1991.106

THIS IS A HAT THAT SAYS DAVID

The election for Israel’s chief rabbi the other day was pitted as a “knitted kipah” vs a “black hat.” Incidentally, the black hat candidate won, but his name is in fact David. Maybe he can wear it under his hat.

Kippot (sing. kippah), or skullcaps, can be used as a form of religious identification. This type of skullcap is known as a kippah sruga, or knit skullcap, and, in many communities around the world and especially in israel, can identify its wearer with national-religious politics, or Modern-Orthodox denomination (though the two are mutually exclusive). In contrast, a black kippah often identifies its wearer as leaning more towards ultra-orthodoxy.

Knitting a skullcap for a male acquaintance can also be one of few socially acceptable (unofficial) ways for an Orthodox woman to court a man.

Skullcap, 20th Century
Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1991.106

LET THE GAMES BEGIN!!! 

On Thursday, a record number of Jewish and Israeli athletes entered Jerusalem for the opening ceremony of one of the world’s largest sporting events, the 19th Maccabiah Games, with 9,000 athletes.

Whoever excels at their particular sport just might go home with a medal like the one shown above. This is a medal from the 11th Maccabiah Games of July 1981.  On one side, four athletes, three males and one female, strike athletic poses. On the other, it looks as though all the athletes on the opposite side have blended into a mass of overlapping lines in motion.  The futuristic style of writing and design perhaps symbolize continuity and conjoining of all Jews, regardless of nationality—coming together at these games to show not only physical strength, but communal strength as well.

Brad Gilbert, a top Jewish tennis player in the 1980s, took home a Men’s Doubles gold medal from these 1981 Maccabiah Games!  You may hear him as a commentator during the US Open this summer.

11th Maccabiah Official Award Medal, brass, cast, 1981, Yeshiva University Museum Collection, 2009.388

AN ARTIST WHO CREATES LANGUAGE TO MAKE ART

YUM’s curator visits the studio of R. Justin Stewart, the artist who created extruded (an eruv project) which is currently on view in It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and BeyondFollow him at zcurator.tumblr.com

AN ARTIST WHO CREATES LANGUAGE TO MAKE ART

A few months ago I discussed the possibility of accessioning a monumental piece by an artist composed of thousands of strings hanging from a ceiling.  Unfortunately my institution would not be able to store this piece, so we talked about accessioning instructions for making the piece … as the piece itself (a la Sol Lewitt I suppose). I recently visited this artist’s studio to find that much of his work is rooted in constructing a language to create pieces — so much so that the creation of language becomes part of the art-making act. 

Brooklyn artist R. Justin Stewart’s studio is dominated by a grid of framed, wordless drawings that appear to be pages ripped from an instruction manual, but which give no obvious image of what the end product might be.  Some of these drawings include circles and other shapes, linked together by small symbols akin to nautical flags, themselves “linked” via red tape lines on the wall, with other drawings present neatly organized shapes and rows of varying-sized circles.  Initially, they struck me as simple, easy to follow instructions for not much of anything, which were meant collectively as a jab at the seemingly simple but occasionally dumbfounding directions for Ikea furniture.

Then Stewart presented a sculpture that looked like an enlarged undersea creature, a spiky bioflorescent organism that lives miles under the sea. It was a structure composed of plastic o-rings held together with hundreds of zip ties. This piece, systems of knowing 03, which included the sculpture and the drawings, revolve around the question of how to communicate instructions for constructing a structure.  

Suddenly Stewart’s language became clear.  The drawings were step-by-step guides to building the sculpture.  The colorful symbols represented actions and material elements, and they appeared on drawings that illustrate how to compile different segments.  Other drawings showed finished segments and sub-segments, all leading to the final sculpture.  Where, moments earlier, I thought I was looking at images and symbols that were purposely meaningless, I could only see a rational syntax for construction. 

I like Stewart’s work aesthetically and conceptually.  He presents large quantities of data in coherent, playful, and seemingly circuitous forms.  However, for me, their greatest impact is that moment when they become clear, when they yield that wonderful moment of epiphany. And that moment emerges not only — and perhaps not primarily — from the encounter with the physical piece, but from a sudden and surprising clarification in the language of the piece.  It’s like suddenly finding yourself able to understand a language that seconds earlier sounded like gibberish

About:

YU Museum creates new ways to experience and interpret Jewish art and history. It is a source for new ideas and perspectives on historic events and cultural phenomena effecting everyone.

Visit YU Museum’s exhibitions and programs! They open the eyes of audiences to new perspectives on Jewish culture, historic events and cultural phenomena. They reveal the vitality and resonance of present-day art on Jewish themes, and reflect and re-interpret millennia of Jewish experiences for the present. Visit: @15 w16th st, NYC

Visit YU Museum @ www.YUMuseum.org

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