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25 HOURS OF FASTING?! …AND YOU THOUGHT YOU HAD A BAD DAY
Today, in the Hebrew calendar, is the 9th of Av (Tisha B’Av in Hebrew), considered by many to be the most tragic day of the year.
Tradition holds that both the First and Second (above) Temples were destroyed on this day. Additionally, the first Crusade began on the 9th of Av, and Jews were expelled from England, France, and Spain on that day, in 1290, 1306, and 1492 respectively.
The day of mourning is observed through a 25 hour fast, and is used as a period of reflection.
King Herod’s Temple Mount in Jerusalem, 1/300 scale. Late 20th Century, Collection of  Yeshiva University Museum. 2006.249

25 HOURS OF FASTING?! …AND YOU THOUGHT YOU HAD A BAD DAY

Today, in the Hebrew calendar, is the 9th of Av (Tisha B’Av in Hebrew), considered by many to be the most tragic day of the year.

Tradition holds that both the First and Second (above) Temples were destroyed on this day. Additionally, the first Crusade began on the 9th of Av, and Jews were expelled from England, France, and Spain on that day, in 1290, 1306, and 1492 respectively.

The day of mourning is observed through a 25 hour fast, and is used as a period of reflection.

King Herod’s Temple Mount in Jerusalem, 1/300 scale. Late 20th CenturyCollection of  Yeshiva University Museum. 2006.249

LET THEM EAT… CHOCOLATE?  THE GENTRY? 

Bastille Day is coming up, so let’s go French…and eat some chocolate!

This French trade card (ca. 1905) was part of an advertising series for the company Chocolat-Poulain.  If advertising’s goals include making a sale and making the customer feel comfortable with the product, this chocolate company is evoking the theme of marriage to do so: “Israelite Marriage,” to be specific.  Below a claim and command of “Unrivaled quality” and “Taste and Compare!” a veiled bride sipping from a cup is flanked by her sharply dressed groom and tallit-draped rabbi.  The back of the card includes a brief description of the Israelites without a nation and the custom of breaking the cup after both bride and groom have sipped from it.

Perhaps the themes of marriage and Israel imply the sacredness of chocolate.  But when Bastille Day comes around, we know what everyone is really thinking about…just don’t guillotine the chocolate!!

Advertising card for Chocolat Poulain, ca. 1905, paper, printed and embossed, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2008.120

TWO FLUTES TOO MANY — FOR THE 9TH OF AV
As if playing one was not enough! The boy in this Reuven Rubin painting serenely plays a double flute, to a tune we can only imagine.
Playing musical instruments, whether singular, double, or triple, is forbidden as a sign of mourning during the three weeks leading up to the 9th of the month of Av, which this year falls out on July 16th. The 9th of Av (Tisha B’Av in Hebrew) is a solemn day during which Jews commemorate a number or tragic events in their national history.
The tragedies that befell the Jewish people on that day include the destruction of both Temples in Jerusalem, and the expulsion of the Jews of Spain in 1492.
Reuven Rubin, The Flute Player. 20th Century, Israel.

TWO FLUTES TOO MANY — FOR THE 9TH OF AV

As if playing one was not enough! The boy in this Reuven Rubin painting serenely plays a double flute, to a tune we can only imagine.

Playing musical instruments, whether singular, double, or triple, is forbidden as a sign of mourning during the three weeks leading up to the 9th of the month of Av, which this year falls out on July 16th. The 9th of Av (Tisha B’Av in Hebrew) is a solemn day during which Jews commemorate a number or tragic events in their national history.

The tragedies that befell the Jewish people on that day include the destruction of both Temples in Jerusalem, and the expulsion of the Jews of Spain in 1492.

Reuven Rubin, The Flute Player. 20th Century, Israel.

MIND ON MY MARRIAGE AND MARRIAGE ON MY MIND
OR
EIGHT DAYS OLD, AND ALREADY GOT MARRIAGE ON MY MIND
This 18th century German cloth was originally used to swaddle a newborn baby boy at his circumcision, or brit milah.
Embroidered on the cloth is the Hebrew phrase, “To Torah, marriage, and good deeds,” which is recited as a blessing for the boy during a traditional brit milah.  If not the boy himself, the cloth at least did go on to Torah, as it later functioned as a wrap for a Torah scroll.
The mention of marriage along with Torah and good deeds demonstrates its centrality to Judaism, not to mention that the boy is only 8 days old!
Torah binder (wimpel) of Matityahu b. R. Pinhas. Germany, 1761. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1987.081

MIND ON MY MARRIAGE AND MARRIAGE ON MY MIND

OR

EIGHT DAYS OLD, AND ALREADY GOT MARRIAGE ON MY MIND

This 18th century German cloth was originally used to swaddle a newborn baby boy at his circumcision, or brit milah.

Embroidered on the cloth is the Hebrew phrase, “To Torah, marriage, and good deeds,” which is recited as a blessing for the boy during a traditional brit milah.  If not the boy himself, the cloth at least did go on to Torah, as it later functioned as a wrap for a Torah scroll.

The mention of marriage along with Torah and good deeds demonstrates its centrality to Judaism, not to mention that the boy is only 8 days old!

Torah binder (wimpel) of Matityahu b. R. Pinhas. Germany, 1761. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1987.081

A STAMP TO STAMP OUT INTOLERANCE IN AMERICA
Acceptance of all people, regardless of race, religion, or anything else, is key. It is good to be reminded of such important ideas right around Independence Day. Happy Fourth of July!
This poster stamp is from 1943-44, evinces a particular principle: peace among the many different ethnic, religious, and cultural groups that made up the United States. It was produced by the Council Against Intolerance in America. 
Poster stamps are larger than a postage stamp and were used to advertise from the 1850s to the 1940s. This stamp’s focal point is the American flag, as well as the statement “One Nation Indivisible,” taken from the Pledge of Allegiance. The American Constitution states that religious freedom is a basic right of everyone. But this right was not always manifest in American society, and many groups faced persecution at different times. This stamp urges us to remember one of the vital elements of the American Constitution. 
Poster Stamp from 1943-44: Issued by the Council Against Intolerance in America. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, 2001.032

A STAMP TO STAMP OUT INTOLERANCE IN AMERICA

Acceptance of all people, regardless of race, religion, or anything else, is key. It is good to be reminded of such important ideas right around Independence Day. Happy Fourth of July!

This poster stamp is from 1943-44, evinces a particular principle: peace among the many different ethnic, religious, and cultural groups that made up the United StatesIt was produced by the Council Against Intolerance in America. 

Poster stamps are larger than a postage stamp and were used to advertise from the 1850s to the 1940s. This stamp’s focal point is the American flag, as well as the statement “One Nation Indivisible,” taken from the Pledge of Allegiance. The American Constitution states that religious freedom is a basic right of everyone. But this right was not always manifest in American society, and many groups faced persecution at different times. This stamp urges us to remember one of the vital elements of the American Constitution. 

Poster Stamp from 1943-44: Issued by the Council Against Intolerance in America. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, 2001.032

UNSUNG HERO OF THE REVOLUTION - HAPPY JULY 4th!

As the joyous holiday approaches along with fireworks, barbecues, thoughts of liberty, George Washington, and tons of red, white and blue, we look back to 1776.  This 20th century work of medallic art by Paul Vincze, however, features an unsung, Jewish hero of the American War for Independence:  Haym Salomon.

The front and back of the medal do not convey any details that appear to be explicitly Jewish.  In fact, the portrayal of Salomon on the medal is similar to that of any of our Founding Fathers.  He is writing with a quill on a scroll by candlelight, symbols of the classic scene of the writing of the Declaration of Independence, and grasping a large rifle, a symbol of the war.  Salomon’s involvement with the war, which was completely nonviolent yet essential, is represented here by his sedentary, large nature and positioning below fighters on horseback.

So perhaps this July 4th you’ll take a second to think of Salomon and how his “brilliant understanding of foreign currency” helped finance the Revolutionary War that allowed us to eat this delicious corn-on-the-cob, I mean celebrate the freedoms and founding of our country.  

P. Vincze, Haym Salomon, 1973, Silver, Cast Medal, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2001.202

I’M GOIN’ TO JACKSON — FOR THE ARTSY ERUV
Just saw this great article on a project to erect an art-eruv next year, which draws on principals in art engagement and interaction.  Very cool!
An Artistic Eruv in Jackson, Mississippi

By Rachel Jarman Myers
I’m involved with a wonderful collection of people in Jackson who work hard to put on Figment, a participatory arts festival that we like to describe as an “art pot luck” party. Artists are asked to install pieces that encourage some kind of artistic participation.
My  project was inspired during a meeting when the Figment team was trying to figure out a way to create a border around the festival, which was taking place on the streets of Jackson’s Midtown neighborhood. Earlier this year I had received information about a wonderful exhibit at the Yeshiva University Museum.  It’s a Thin Line was an exhibit about the Manhattaneruv and included a fascinating short video about its history and significance. Inspired by this very public and creative Jewish tradition, I thought of adapting the practice for my Figment project.
read the rest at myjewishlearning.com: http://www.myjewishlearning.com/blog/southern-and-jewish/2013/05/24/an-artistic-eruv-in-jackson-mississippi/

I’M GOIN’ TO JACKSON — FOR THE ARTSY ERUV

Just saw this great article on a project to erect an art-eruv next year, which draws on principals in art engagement and interaction.  Very cool!

An Artistic Eruv in Jackson, Mississippi

I’m involved with a wonderful collection of people in Jackson who work hard to put on Figment, a participatory arts festival that we like to describe as an “art pot luck” party. Artists are asked to install pieces that encourage some kind of artistic participation.

My  project was inspired during a meeting when the Figment team was trying to figure out a way to create a border around the festival, which was taking place on the streets of Jackson’s Midtown neighborhood. Earlier this year I had received information about a wonderful exhibit at the Yeshiva University Museum.  It’s a Thin Line was an exhibit about the Manhattaneruv and included a fascinating short video about its history and significance. Inspired by this very public and creative Jewish tradition, I thought of adapting the practice for my Figment project.

read the rest at myjewishlearning.com: http://www.myjewishlearning.com/blog/southern-and-jewish/2013/05/24/an-artistic-eruv-in-jackson-mississippi/

99 YEARS SINCE A BULLET STARTED THE (REALLY NOT THAT) GREAT WAR
It’s been 99 years to the day that the event that started World War I occurred  the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  This poster is a reminder of the traumas, both personal and national, that the war produced.
This poster requests a 1/2 dollar donation to provide relief to Jewish refugees and civilians whose communities were in the middle of the fighting. It’s modeled after an ancient practice of taking a census. After their successful exodus from Egypt, the ancient Israelites needed to take a census. Every individual was required to give a half shekel to a national fund, and therefore the population could be found by doubling the amount of shekels raised. One was not allowed to give more or less than half a shekel in order to make each member of the nation feel equally important.
This poster’s request for a half dollar evokes that passage—it was a reminder of the ancient victims’ relief that could hopefully translate to the relief for Jewish victims of World War I.
Don’t Forget Your 1/2d for the Jewish Victims of the War, Poster, ca 19914-1918,  YUM Collection, 1998.701. 

99 YEARS SINCE A BULLET STARTED THE (REALLY NOT THAT) GREAT WAR

It’s been 99 years to the day that the event that started World War I occurred  the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  This poster is a reminder of the traumas, both personal and national, that the war produced.

This poster requests a 1/2 dollar donation to provide relief to Jewish refugees and civilians whose communities were in the middle of the fighting. It’s modeled after an ancient practice of taking a census. After their successful exodus from Egypt, the ancient Israelites needed to take a census. Every individual was required to give a half shekel to a national fund, and therefore the population could be found by doubling the amount of shekels raised. One was not allowed to give more or less than half a shekel in order to make each member of the nation feel equally important.

This poster’s request for a half dollar evokes that passage—it was a reminder of the ancient victims’ relief that could hopefully translate to the relief for Jewish victims of World War I.

Don’t Forget Your 1/2d for the Jewish Victims of the War, Poster, ca 19914-1918,  YUM Collection, 1998.701

FIRE AND FASTING
…or, I remember the 17th of Tamuz like it was yesterday (which it was)
1,943 years and one day ago, Jerusalem was a center of the Jewish revolt against the Roman empire.  On the 17th of the Hebrew month of Tamuz (yesterday) the city’s were breached by the Romans, all but assuring the destruction of the city and its ever-important (second) Temple.
David Roberts painted the scene in the 1840s, though he dated this print to September 71 CE, a year after the destruction. The 17th of Tammuz came three weeks before the destruction of the Temple. Traditionally, the day is observed through fasting.
Incidentally, Jewish tradition also holds that it was the day on which Moses smashed the first set of tablets bearing the 10 commandments.
David Roberts, The Siege and Destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans, Hand-colored Print, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2003.003

FIRE AND FASTING

…or, I remember the 17th of Tamuz like it was yesterday (which it was)

1,943 years and one day ago, Jerusalem was a center of the Jewish revolt against the Roman empire.  On the 17th of the Hebrew month of Tamuz (yesterday) the city’s were breached by the Romans, all but assuring the destruction of the city and its ever-important (second) Temple.

David Roberts painted the scene in the 1840s, though he dated this print to September 71 CE, a year after the destruction. The 17th of Tammuz came three weeks before the destruction of the Temple. Traditionally, the day is observed through fasting.

Incidentally, Jewish tradition also holds that it was the day on which Moses smashed the first set of tablets bearing the 10 commandments.

David Roberts, The Siege and Destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans, Hand-colored Print, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2003.003

25 HOURS OF FASTING?! …AND YOU THOUGHT YOU HAD A BAD DAY
Today, in the Hebrew calendar, is the 9th of Av (Tisha B’Av in Hebrew), considered by many to be the most tragic day of the year.
Tradition holds that both the First and Second (above) Temples were destroyed on this day. Additionally, the first Crusade began on the 9th of Av, and Jews were expelled from England, France, and Spain on that day, in 1290, 1306, and 1492 respectively.
The day of mourning is observed through a 25 hour fast, and is used as a period of reflection.
King Herod’s Temple Mount in Jerusalem, 1/300 scale. Late 20th Century, Collection of  Yeshiva University Museum. 2006.249

25 HOURS OF FASTING?! …AND YOU THOUGHT YOU HAD A BAD DAY

Today, in the Hebrew calendar, is the 9th of Av (Tisha B’Av in Hebrew), considered by many to be the most tragic day of the year.

Tradition holds that both the First and Second (above) Temples were destroyed on this day. Additionally, the first Crusade began on the 9th of Av, and Jews were expelled from England, France, and Spain on that day, in 1290, 1306, and 1492 respectively.

The day of mourning is observed through a 25 hour fast, and is used as a period of reflection.

King Herod’s Temple Mount in Jerusalem, 1/300 scale. Late 20th CenturyCollection of  Yeshiva University Museum. 2006.249

LET THEM EAT… CHOCOLATE?  THE GENTRY? 

Bastille Day is coming up, so let’s go French…and eat some chocolate!

This French trade card (ca. 1905) was part of an advertising series for the company Chocolat-Poulain.  If advertising’s goals include making a sale and making the customer feel comfortable with the product, this chocolate company is evoking the theme of marriage to do so: “Israelite Marriage,” to be specific.  Below a claim and command of “Unrivaled quality” and “Taste and Compare!” a veiled bride sipping from a cup is flanked by her sharply dressed groom and tallit-draped rabbi.  The back of the card includes a brief description of the Israelites without a nation and the custom of breaking the cup after both bride and groom have sipped from it.

Perhaps the themes of marriage and Israel imply the sacredness of chocolate.  But when Bastille Day comes around, we know what everyone is really thinking about…just don’t guillotine the chocolate!!

Advertising card for Chocolat Poulain, ca. 1905, paper, printed and embossed, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2008.120

TWO FLUTES TOO MANY — FOR THE 9TH OF AV
As if playing one was not enough! The boy in this Reuven Rubin painting serenely plays a double flute, to a tune we can only imagine.
Playing musical instruments, whether singular, double, or triple, is forbidden as a sign of mourning during the three weeks leading up to the 9th of the month of Av, which this year falls out on July 16th. The 9th of Av (Tisha B’Av in Hebrew) is a solemn day during which Jews commemorate a number or tragic events in their national history.
The tragedies that befell the Jewish people on that day include the destruction of both Temples in Jerusalem, and the expulsion of the Jews of Spain in 1492.
Reuven Rubin, The Flute Player. 20th Century, Israel.

TWO FLUTES TOO MANY — FOR THE 9TH OF AV

As if playing one was not enough! The boy in this Reuven Rubin painting serenely plays a double flute, to a tune we can only imagine.

Playing musical instruments, whether singular, double, or triple, is forbidden as a sign of mourning during the three weeks leading up to the 9th of the month of Av, which this year falls out on July 16th. The 9th of Av (Tisha B’Av in Hebrew) is a solemn day during which Jews commemorate a number or tragic events in their national history.

The tragedies that befell the Jewish people on that day include the destruction of both Temples in Jerusalem, and the expulsion of the Jews of Spain in 1492.

Reuven Rubin, The Flute Player. 20th Century, Israel.

MIND ON MY MARRIAGE AND MARRIAGE ON MY MIND
OR
EIGHT DAYS OLD, AND ALREADY GOT MARRIAGE ON MY MIND
This 18th century German cloth was originally used to swaddle a newborn baby boy at his circumcision, or brit milah.
Embroidered on the cloth is the Hebrew phrase, “To Torah, marriage, and good deeds,” which is recited as a blessing for the boy during a traditional brit milah.  If not the boy himself, the cloth at least did go on to Torah, as it later functioned as a wrap for a Torah scroll.
The mention of marriage along with Torah and good deeds demonstrates its centrality to Judaism, not to mention that the boy is only 8 days old!
Torah binder (wimpel) of Matityahu b. R. Pinhas. Germany, 1761. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1987.081

MIND ON MY MARRIAGE AND MARRIAGE ON MY MIND

OR

EIGHT DAYS OLD, AND ALREADY GOT MARRIAGE ON MY MIND

This 18th century German cloth was originally used to swaddle a newborn baby boy at his circumcision, or brit milah.

Embroidered on the cloth is the Hebrew phrase, “To Torah, marriage, and good deeds,” which is recited as a blessing for the boy during a traditional brit milah.  If not the boy himself, the cloth at least did go on to Torah, as it later functioned as a wrap for a Torah scroll.

The mention of marriage along with Torah and good deeds demonstrates its centrality to Judaism, not to mention that the boy is only 8 days old!

Torah binder (wimpel) of Matityahu b. R. Pinhas. Germany, 1761. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 1987.081

A STAMP TO STAMP OUT INTOLERANCE IN AMERICA
Acceptance of all people, regardless of race, religion, or anything else, is key. It is good to be reminded of such important ideas right around Independence Day. Happy Fourth of July!
This poster stamp is from 1943-44, evinces a particular principle: peace among the many different ethnic, religious, and cultural groups that made up the United States. It was produced by the Council Against Intolerance in America. 
Poster stamps are larger than a postage stamp and were used to advertise from the 1850s to the 1940s. This stamp’s focal point is the American flag, as well as the statement “One Nation Indivisible,” taken from the Pledge of Allegiance. The American Constitution states that religious freedom is a basic right of everyone. But this right was not always manifest in American society, and many groups faced persecution at different times. This stamp urges us to remember one of the vital elements of the American Constitution. 
Poster Stamp from 1943-44: Issued by the Council Against Intolerance in America. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, 2001.032

A STAMP TO STAMP OUT INTOLERANCE IN AMERICA

Acceptance of all people, regardless of race, religion, or anything else, is key. It is good to be reminded of such important ideas right around Independence Day. Happy Fourth of July!

This poster stamp is from 1943-44, evinces a particular principle: peace among the many different ethnic, religious, and cultural groups that made up the United StatesIt was produced by the Council Against Intolerance in America. 

Poster stamps are larger than a postage stamp and were used to advertise from the 1850s to the 1940s. This stamp’s focal point is the American flag, as well as the statement “One Nation Indivisible,” taken from the Pledge of Allegiance. The American Constitution states that religious freedom is a basic right of everyone. But this right was not always manifest in American society, and many groups faced persecution at different times. This stamp urges us to remember one of the vital elements of the American Constitution. 

Poster Stamp from 1943-44: Issued by the Council Against Intolerance in America. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, 2001.032

UNSUNG HERO OF THE REVOLUTION - HAPPY JULY 4th!

As the joyous holiday approaches along with fireworks, barbecues, thoughts of liberty, George Washington, and tons of red, white and blue, we look back to 1776.  This 20th century work of medallic art by Paul Vincze, however, features an unsung, Jewish hero of the American War for Independence:  Haym Salomon.

The front and back of the medal do not convey any details that appear to be explicitly Jewish.  In fact, the portrayal of Salomon on the medal is similar to that of any of our Founding Fathers.  He is writing with a quill on a scroll by candlelight, symbols of the classic scene of the writing of the Declaration of Independence, and grasping a large rifle, a symbol of the war.  Salomon’s involvement with the war, which was completely nonviolent yet essential, is represented here by his sedentary, large nature and positioning below fighters on horseback.

So perhaps this July 4th you’ll take a second to think of Salomon and how his “brilliant understanding of foreign currency” helped finance the Revolutionary War that allowed us to eat this delicious corn-on-the-cob, I mean celebrate the freedoms and founding of our country.  

P. Vincze, Haym Salomon, 1973, Silver, Cast Medal, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2001.202

I’M GOIN’ TO JACKSON — FOR THE ARTSY ERUV
Just saw this great article on a project to erect an art-eruv next year, which draws on principals in art engagement and interaction.  Very cool!
An Artistic Eruv in Jackson, Mississippi

By Rachel Jarman Myers
I’m involved with a wonderful collection of people in Jackson who work hard to put on Figment, a participatory arts festival that we like to describe as an “art pot luck” party. Artists are asked to install pieces that encourage some kind of artistic participation.
My  project was inspired during a meeting when the Figment team was trying to figure out a way to create a border around the festival, which was taking place on the streets of Jackson’s Midtown neighborhood. Earlier this year I had received information about a wonderful exhibit at the Yeshiva University Museum.  It’s a Thin Line was an exhibit about the Manhattaneruv and included a fascinating short video about its history and significance. Inspired by this very public and creative Jewish tradition, I thought of adapting the practice for my Figment project.
read the rest at myjewishlearning.com: http://www.myjewishlearning.com/blog/southern-and-jewish/2013/05/24/an-artistic-eruv-in-jackson-mississippi/

I’M GOIN’ TO JACKSON — FOR THE ARTSY ERUV

Just saw this great article on a project to erect an art-eruv next year, which draws on principals in art engagement and interaction.  Very cool!

An Artistic Eruv in Jackson, Mississippi

I’m involved with a wonderful collection of people in Jackson who work hard to put on Figment, a participatory arts festival that we like to describe as an “art pot luck” party. Artists are asked to install pieces that encourage some kind of artistic participation.

My  project was inspired during a meeting when the Figment team was trying to figure out a way to create a border around the festival, which was taking place on the streets of Jackson’s Midtown neighborhood. Earlier this year I had received information about a wonderful exhibit at the Yeshiva University Museum.  It’s a Thin Line was an exhibit about the Manhattaneruv and included a fascinating short video about its history and significance. Inspired by this very public and creative Jewish tradition, I thought of adapting the practice for my Figment project.

read the rest at myjewishlearning.com: http://www.myjewishlearning.com/blog/southern-and-jewish/2013/05/24/an-artistic-eruv-in-jackson-mississippi/

99 YEARS SINCE A BULLET STARTED THE (REALLY NOT THAT) GREAT WAR
It’s been 99 years to the day that the event that started World War I occurred  the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  This poster is a reminder of the traumas, both personal and national, that the war produced.
This poster requests a 1/2 dollar donation to provide relief to Jewish refugees and civilians whose communities were in the middle of the fighting. It’s modeled after an ancient practice of taking a census. After their successful exodus from Egypt, the ancient Israelites needed to take a census. Every individual was required to give a half shekel to a national fund, and therefore the population could be found by doubling the amount of shekels raised. One was not allowed to give more or less than half a shekel in order to make each member of the nation feel equally important.
This poster’s request for a half dollar evokes that passage—it was a reminder of the ancient victims’ relief that could hopefully translate to the relief for Jewish victims of World War I.
Don’t Forget Your 1/2d for the Jewish Victims of the War, Poster, ca 19914-1918,  YUM Collection, 1998.701. 

99 YEARS SINCE A BULLET STARTED THE (REALLY NOT THAT) GREAT WAR

It’s been 99 years to the day that the event that started World War I occurred  the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  This poster is a reminder of the traumas, both personal and national, that the war produced.

This poster requests a 1/2 dollar donation to provide relief to Jewish refugees and civilians whose communities were in the middle of the fighting. It’s modeled after an ancient practice of taking a census. After their successful exodus from Egypt, the ancient Israelites needed to take a census. Every individual was required to give a half shekel to a national fund, and therefore the population could be found by doubling the amount of shekels raised. One was not allowed to give more or less than half a shekel in order to make each member of the nation feel equally important.

This poster’s request for a half dollar evokes that passage—it was a reminder of the ancient victims’ relief that could hopefully translate to the relief for Jewish victims of World War I.

Don’t Forget Your 1/2d for the Jewish Victims of the War, Poster, ca 19914-1918,  YUM Collection, 1998.701

FIRE AND FASTING
…or, I remember the 17th of Tamuz like it was yesterday (which it was)
1,943 years and one day ago, Jerusalem was a center of the Jewish revolt against the Roman empire.  On the 17th of the Hebrew month of Tamuz (yesterday) the city’s were breached by the Romans, all but assuring the destruction of the city and its ever-important (second) Temple.
David Roberts painted the scene in the 1840s, though he dated this print to September 71 CE, a year after the destruction. The 17th of Tammuz came three weeks before the destruction of the Temple. Traditionally, the day is observed through fasting.
Incidentally, Jewish tradition also holds that it was the day on which Moses smashed the first set of tablets bearing the 10 commandments.
David Roberts, The Siege and Destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans, Hand-colored Print, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2003.003

FIRE AND FASTING

…or, I remember the 17th of Tamuz like it was yesterday (which it was)

1,943 years and one day ago, Jerusalem was a center of the Jewish revolt against the Roman empire.  On the 17th of the Hebrew month of Tamuz (yesterday) the city’s were breached by the Romans, all but assuring the destruction of the city and its ever-important (second) Temple.

David Roberts painted the scene in the 1840s, though he dated this print to September 71 CE, a year after the destruction. The 17th of Tammuz came three weeks before the destruction of the Temple. Traditionally, the day is observed through fasting.

Incidentally, Jewish tradition also holds that it was the day on which Moses smashed the first set of tablets bearing the 10 commandments.

David Roberts, The Siege and Destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans, Hand-colored Print, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2003.003

About:

YU Museum creates new ways to experience and interpret Jewish art and history. It is a source for new ideas and perspectives on historic events and cultural phenomena effecting everyone.

Visit YU Museum’s exhibitions and programs! They open the eyes of audiences to new perspectives on Jewish culture, historic events and cultural phenomena. They reveal the vitality and resonance of present-day art on Jewish themes, and reflect and re-interpret millennia of Jewish experiences for the present. Visit: @15 w16th st, NYC

Visit YU Museum @ www.YUMuseum.org

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