SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!
The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens! 
Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring. 
This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel. 
2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!

The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens!

Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring.

This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel.

2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!
The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens! 
Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring. 
This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel. 
2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

SO WHERE DOES MATZAH FOR PASSOVER COME FROM ANYWAY? - PASSOVER IS ON ITS WAY!

The store?  Meh….by not… It comes from a factory! A special Factory! One filled with people and absolutely no leavend bread, special flower, and ovens!

Matzah is the special unleavened, flat bread/cracker that many Jews eat on Passover to commemorate the Jews’ quick escape from slavery in ancient Egypt (it didn’t rise because they didn’t have time to bake the bread, having to get up and go right away). It is also called the ‘bread of affliction’ because this solid bread-ish product just sits in the stomach, leaving one filled up but still undernourished. The third reason for this bread? Sure: it’s likely that early farmers (like thousands of years ago) ate a similar bread during a festival to celebrate the first grain harvest of each spring.

This image features a matzah factory in Israel. It was one of a series of glass lantern slides used at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, New York, to familiarize campers with Israel.

2009.484 Matzah factory, Israel, ca. 1930s, Gift of Av Rivel, Collection of YU Museum

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