FAT DRACULA? This German postcard from the early 1900’s depicts a hunched over Jewish garment worker having his blood sucked out of the back of his neck. The winged man represents, not Dracula, but rather the life-sucking disease tuberculosis. Rampant in the early 1900’s, tuberculosis was particularly prevalent among underprivileged classes and in over-crowded work spaces, such as the over-stuffed garment shops across Manhattan (think the Triangle Shirtwaist fire).The recent tragic collapse of a garment factory in Bangladesh has brought new attention to the old, international plight of garment workers. A worldwide, century-long effort to fight TB has been somewhat effective, yet millions still die yearly as a result of inhumane labor conditions. Lets hope that the renewed efforts to make garment factories safer will come to fruition sooner.
Ephraim Moses Lilien, Garment Worker Sickened by Tuberculosis, Berlin, Germany. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2002.169

FAT DRACULA?

This German postcard from the early 1900’s depicts a hunched over Jewish garment worker having his blood sucked out of the back of his neck. The winged man represents, not Dracula, but rather the life-sucking disease tuberculosis. Rampant in the early 1900’s, tuberculosis was particularly prevalent among underprivileged classes and in over-crowded work spaces, such as the over-stuffed garment shops across Manhattan (think the Triangle Shirtwaist fire).

The recent tragic collapse of a garment factory in Bangladesh has brought new attention to the old, international plight of garment workers. A worldwide, century-long effort to fight TB has been somewhat effective, yet millions still die yearly as a result of inhumane labor conditions. Lets hope that the renewed efforts to make garment factories safer will come to fruition sooner.


Ephraim Moses Lilien, Garment Worker Sickened by Tuberculosis,
Berlin, Germany. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2002.169

FAT DRACULA? This German postcard from the early 1900’s depicts a hunched over Jewish garment worker having his blood sucked out of the back of his neck. The winged man represents, not Dracula, but rather the life-sucking disease tuberculosis. Rampant in the early 1900’s, tuberculosis was particularly prevalent among underprivileged classes and in over-crowded work spaces, such as the over-stuffed garment shops across Manhattan (think the Triangle Shirtwaist fire).The recent tragic collapse of a garment factory in Bangladesh has brought new attention to the old, international plight of garment workers. A worldwide, century-long effort to fight TB has been somewhat effective, yet millions still die yearly as a result of inhumane labor conditions. Lets hope that the renewed efforts to make garment factories safer will come to fruition sooner.
Ephraim Moses Lilien, Garment Worker Sickened by Tuberculosis, Berlin, Germany. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2002.169

FAT DRACULA?

This German postcard from the early 1900’s depicts a hunched over Jewish garment worker having his blood sucked out of the back of his neck. The winged man represents, not Dracula, but rather the life-sucking disease tuberculosis. Rampant in the early 1900’s, tuberculosis was particularly prevalent among underprivileged classes and in over-crowded work spaces, such as the over-stuffed garment shops across Manhattan (think the Triangle Shirtwaist fire).

The recent tragic collapse of a garment factory in Bangladesh has brought new attention to the old, international plight of garment workers. A worldwide, century-long effort to fight TB has been somewhat effective, yet millions still die yearly as a result of inhumane labor conditions. Lets hope that the renewed efforts to make garment factories safer will come to fruition sooner.


Ephraim Moses Lilien, Garment Worker Sickened by Tuberculosis,
Berlin, Germany. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2002.169

Notes:

  1. mastercheifer reblogged this from monkijuice
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  8. senses-working-overtime reblogged this from yumuseum and added:
    Robber baron capitalism?
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  13. nprglobalhealth reblogged this from yumuseum and added:
    Learn more about tuberculosis in the U.S. and Eastern Europe in our recent series.
  14. obladi-oblada1 reblogged this from yumuseum
  15. glamvulture reblogged this from missworthing and added:
    Seriously thought this was some sort of Anti-Semitic Propaganda… real explanation makes much more sense.
  16. redfivetwo reblogged this from sassyfrasscircus

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