ANTIRIYA BY TERZIYA… THAT IS, JUNE IS WEDDING MONTH!
The embroidered ornamentation of this dress, called an Antiriya, was created by  a craftsman known as Terziya. This is the traditional style worn on ceremonial  occasions by Sephardic women in Sarajevo. It would be worn over a chemise. On  her head the woman wore a tokádo. The wide false sleeves resemble those  fashionable in Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries.
Ceremonial  Dress. Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, ca. 1890. Velvet: embroidered with strips of silver  thread washed with gold, wrapped around silk (?) thread; coral beads. Collection  of Yeshiva University Museum (1975.053). Gift of Joseph Levi, preserved by Lotti  and Isidor Sambulovic of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Worn by Safira Danon for her  marriage to Samuel Sumbulovic in Sarajevo (then part of the Habsburg monarchy)  in 1890

ANTIRIYA BY TERZIYA… THAT IS, JUNE IS WEDDING MONTH!

The embroidered ornamentation of this dress, called an Antiriya, was created by a craftsman known as Terziya. This is the traditional style worn on ceremonial occasions by Sephardic women in Sarajevo. It would be worn over a chemise. On her head the woman wore a tokádo. The wide false sleeves resemble those fashionable in Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries.

Ceremonial Dress. Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, ca. 1890. Velvet: embroidered with strips of silver thread washed with gold, wrapped around silk (?) thread; coral beads. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1975.053). Gift of Joseph Levi, preserved by Lotti and Isidor Sambulovic of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Worn by Safira Danon for her marriage to Samuel Sumbulovic in Sarajevo (then part of the Habsburg monarchy) in 1890

ANTIRIYA BY TERZIYA… THAT IS, JUNE IS WEDDING MONTH!
The embroidered ornamentation of this dress, called an Antiriya, was created by  a craftsman known as Terziya. This is the traditional style worn on ceremonial  occasions by Sephardic women in Sarajevo. It would be worn over a chemise. On  her head the woman wore a tokádo. The wide false sleeves resemble those  fashionable in Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries.
Ceremonial  Dress. Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, ca. 1890. Velvet: embroidered with strips of silver  thread washed with gold, wrapped around silk (?) thread; coral beads. Collection  of Yeshiva University Museum (1975.053). Gift of Joseph Levi, preserved by Lotti  and Isidor Sambulovic of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Worn by Safira Danon for her  marriage to Samuel Sumbulovic in Sarajevo (then part of the Habsburg monarchy)  in 1890

ANTIRIYA BY TERZIYA… THAT IS, JUNE IS WEDDING MONTH!

The embroidered ornamentation of this dress, called an Antiriya, was created by a craftsman known as Terziya. This is the traditional style worn on ceremonial occasions by Sephardic women in Sarajevo. It would be worn over a chemise. On her head the woman wore a tokádo. The wide false sleeves resemble those fashionable in Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries.

Ceremonial Dress. Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, ca. 1890. Velvet: embroidered with strips of silver thread washed with gold, wrapped around silk (?) thread; coral beads. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1975.053). Gift of Joseph Levi, preserved by Lotti and Isidor Sambulovic of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Worn by Safira Danon for her marriage to Samuel Sumbulovic in Sarajevo (then part of the Habsburg monarchy) in 1890

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