/tagged/Jewish+Art/page/2

A MUSEUM STORY

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Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert was a sculptor and designer of Jewish ritual objects and was regarded as the first artist to integrate Hebrew lettering with silver ceremonial objects. He worked in a variety of materials in addition to silver—aluminum and other metals, glass, plastic, wood, and textiles. Originally from  Hildesheim, Germany, Wolpert at an early age, developed an interest in art. From 1916 until 1920, he studied sculpture in Frankfurt-am-Main’s Kunstgewerbeschule, School for Arts and Crafts. After several years of independent work as a sculptor, he returned to the School of Arts and Crafts to study metalwork under a silversmith who had previously taught at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Leo Horowitz. It was then that Wolpert decided to devote himself to Jewish ceremonial art, applying the new trends of that time. 

image

 In 1935, he became a professor at the New Bezalel Academy for Arts and Crafts in Jerusalem. His teaching stressed simplicity and functional purity of design, and influenced generations of Israeli artists and craftsmen. 

Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert was recognized in his time by the many commissions he received to create Judaica for synagogues, museums, and other public places, as well as from individuals to commemorate important personal events. Yesterday at the Center for Jewish History the Harry G. Friedman Society, an organization of Judaica collectors, met  for a lecture and tour of Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition Light and Shadows:  The Story of Iranian Jews (closing April 27, 2014).  During the meeting, one of the members, Sandy Lepelstat, mentioned that she and her husband Joe had commissioned a portrait bust of their son, David, from Ludwig Wolpert.  Wolpert made two, one for himself.  Lepelstat asked how she might go about finding out who has the bust Wolpert kept.  Bonni-Dara Michaels, Collections Curator for Yeshiva University Museum, told the Lepelstats that the Museum owns the bust, and brought it down from storage for members to examine. In just one moment, the connection was made. There it was in front of her eyes, the bust of her thirteen year old son.

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A GUIDE FOR THE PERPLEXED - A CONVERSATION WITH DARA HORN 


Monday, January 27, 2014 | 7:30 pm


In her critically acclaimed new novel, A Guide for the Perplexed, Dara Horn uses the Cairo Geniza as the backdrop for a powerful story about our search for knowledge, intimacy and enlightenment. Intertwining the remarkable story of the Geniza’s discovery with a dramatic contemporary tale of a futuristic software program that records everything its users do, A Guide is a riveting story and an insightful meditation on the power and limits of human imagination, as well as on the tension between faith and reason.


Join us for a special conversation with the author in combination with a viewing of Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue. Featured in the exhibition are two manuscripts by Moses Maimonides, including a draft of a portion of his Guide for the Perplexed, one of the greatest philosophical works of the Middle Ages – and an inspiration for Horn’s novelistic tour‐de‐force. Guests are invited to visit the exhibition before the program, beginning at 6:45 pm.


Tickets: $10, general; $7 YUM members, students, seniors
For tickets, go to: www.smarttix.com; or call (212) 868‐4444

A village of havdalah spice boxes #collection #art #judaica #yum #yeshivauniversity #yeshivauniversitymuseum #jews #jewish

A village of havdalah spice boxes #collection #art #judaica #yum #yeshivauniversity #yeshivauniversitymuseum #jews #jewish

The filming of a tiny tombstone #benezra 

The filming of a tiny tombstone #benezra 

SOUND OF THE WRITTEN WORD

DISCUSSION AND PERFORMANCE JUDAH HALEVI IN WORD AND SOUND – POETRY, PIYYUT, AND LITURGY


Monday, January 13, 2014 | 7:00 pm


The writing of Judah Halevi bridges poetry and piyyut, secular text and religious liturgy. Join anthropologist and vocalist Galeet Dardashti, professor Raymond Scheindlin, and cantor Emanuel Shalom, together with musicians, as they trace the origins and cultural context and bring to life – through discussion and performance – the sound of Halevi’s words and poems.


The program complements Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition, Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue. Guests are invited to visit the exhibition before the program, beginning at 5:00 pm.


Co‐presented with the American Sephardi Federation

Tickets: $10, General; $7 YUM, ASF members, students, seniors

For tickets, go to: www.smarttix.com; or call (212) 868‐4444

RETHINKING EXISTING RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS
From YU Museum’s curator.  Follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com
Today, any suggestion about placing a symbol rooted in religion on, in or in front of a public building stirs up a whirlwind of controversy.  Yet, only a few decades ago, such references to the Hebrew bible in particular were common references to what was perceived as the ‘Western’ legal and cultural tradition.  It would be common to see reliefs of Moses beside Socrates, Goethe, and Copernicus on a library or museum. This particular image is on the front of a courthouse in downtown Brooklyn.  YU Museum’s curator offers a way to re-interpret it for today.
Have a wonderful weekend! 
Thanks zcurator!

AND MOSES SAID, “I ORDERD THE TOFU SCRAMBLE! SEE YOU IN COURT!” 
In this one of two reliefs on the facade of the court house in Brooklyn on Adams Street (adjacent to Borough Hall), moses might be seen bringing the Ten Commandments ‘down to the people.’ It is meant to allude to a conception of a western legal tradition rooted in Judeo-Christian text. Yet, inscribing such scenes on public buildings is largely taboo today because they refer to a particular religious tradition, and perhaps can be regarded as perpetuating a theistic vision cosmology. 
HOWEVER, this being Brooklyn, which is perhaps the heart of the great North American brunch tradition today, and considering that we’re living in a particularly litigious moment in American culture, we might understand this image as a Moses so irate that his brunch order was screwed up, that he took the restaurant staff to court.  Yeah, that makes sense. 

RETHINKING EXISTING RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS

From YU Museum’s curator.  Follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com

Today, any suggestion about placing a symbol rooted in religion on, in or in front of a public building stirs up a whirlwind of controversy.  Yet, only a few decades ago, such references to the Hebrew bible in particular were common references to what was perceived as the ‘Western’ legal and cultural tradition.  It would be common to see reliefs of Moses beside Socrates, Goethe, and Copernicus on a library or museum. This particular image is on the front of a courthouse in downtown Brooklyn.  YU Museum’s curator offers a way to re-interpret it for today.

Have a wonderful weekend! 

Thanks zcurator!

AND MOSES SAID, “I ORDERD THE TOFU SCRAMBLE! SEE YOU IN COURT!” 

In this one of two reliefs on the facade of the court house in Brooklyn on Adams Street (adjacent to Borough Hall), moses might be seen bringing the Ten Commandments ‘down to the people.’ It is meant to allude to a conception of a western legal tradition rooted in Judeo-Christian text. Yet, inscribing such scenes on public buildings is largely taboo today because they refer to a particular religious tradition, and perhaps can be regarded as perpetuating a theistic vision cosmology. 

HOWEVER, this being Brooklyn, which is perhaps the heart of the great North American brunch tradition today, and considering that we’re living in a particularly litigious moment in American culture, we might understand this image as a Moses so irate that his brunch order was screwed up, that he took the restaurant staff to court.  Yeah, that makes sense. 

IT’S GETTING HOT OUT THERE, AND IT’S AFTER MEMORIAL DAY!

As heats up, it might be a good time to start wearing white.  But you only have a few months! Even though, wearing white after Labor Day is not necessarily frowned upon anymore, every time I wear white I know that my bubby (grandmother) will say, “No whites after Labor Day!”

(left) White middy blouse with pocket embroidered with three playing cards, black tassel at front neckline, and two buttons.

(right) Uniform. White lab coat with: collar; wrist-length sleeves with button closure; gathered at waist; pocket over right breast inscribed Social Service; 2 pockets in skirt. chest: 17 1/2 in.; waist 12 1/4 in; skirt length waist to hem 24 1/2 in.

Yeshiva University Museum, New York (1999.232) Gift of Lucy Benedikt

TIME TO HIT THE BOOKS-BACK TO SCHOOL!
The first days of school are always filled with great expectations. This year will bring knowledge and inevitably lots of homework. Be prepared this year and achieve your best GPA yet. Just look how studious these girls are in their Brooklyn classroom in 1934.
Slide. Girls Learning in a Classroom. Yeshiva University Museum (2009.555) Gift of Av Rivel

TIME TO HIT THE BOOKS-BACK TO SCHOOL!

The first days of school are always filled with great expectations. This year will bring knowledge and inevitably lots of homework. Be prepared this year and achieve your best GPA yet. Just look how studious these girls are in their Brooklyn classroom in 1934.

Slide. Girls Learning in a Classroom. Yeshiva University Museum (2009.555) Gift of Av Rivel

DREAM BIG OR GO HOME-BACK TO SCHOOL!
College is the opportunity of a lifetime. In addition to providing great friends and inspiring teachers, higher education helps you to nurture your dreams. Dream big this semester…Dream of being an artist like these students!
Photograph showing men and a woman seated in a brightly-lighted room. In the center of their chairs are three benches, one topped by a pot on three feet; the second with a classical bust of a man (the poet Homer); the third with striding lion. An older man stands by the chair of one of the students. At the far end of the room is a six-pointed star above a cabinet containing busts. #37.
Slide. Technicum (Technion) - Drawing [class]. Yeshiva University Museum, New York (2009.435). Gift of Av Rivel

DREAM BIG OR GO HOME-BACK TO SCHOOL!

College is the opportunity of a lifetime. In addition to providing great friends and inspiring teachers, higher education helps you to nurture your dreams. Dream big this semester…Dream of being an artist like these students!

Photograph showing men and a woman seated in a brightly-lighted room. In the center of their chairs are three benches, one topped by a pot on three feet; the second with a classical bust of a man (the poet Homer); the third with striding lion. An older man stands by the chair of one of the students. At the far end of the room is a six-pointed star above a cabinet containing busts. #37.

Slide. Technicum (Technion) - Drawing [class]. Yeshiva University Museum, New York (2009.435). Gift of Av Rivel

A MUSEUM STORY

image

Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert was a sculptor and designer of Jewish ritual objects and was regarded as the first artist to integrate Hebrew lettering with silver ceremonial objects. He worked in a variety of materials in addition to silver—aluminum and other metals, glass, plastic, wood, and textiles. Originally from  Hildesheim, Germany, Wolpert at an early age, developed an interest in art. From 1916 until 1920, he studied sculpture in Frankfurt-am-Main’s Kunstgewerbeschule, School for Arts and Crafts. After several years of independent work as a sculptor, he returned to the School of Arts and Crafts to study metalwork under a silversmith who had previously taught at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Leo Horowitz. It was then that Wolpert decided to devote himself to Jewish ceremonial art, applying the new trends of that time. 

image

 In 1935, he became a professor at the New Bezalel Academy for Arts and Crafts in Jerusalem. His teaching stressed simplicity and functional purity of design, and influenced generations of Israeli artists and craftsmen. 

Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert was recognized in his time by the many commissions he received to create Judaica for synagogues, museums, and other public places, as well as from individuals to commemorate important personal events. Yesterday at the Center for Jewish History the Harry G. Friedman Society, an organization of Judaica collectors, met  for a lecture and tour of Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition Light and Shadows:  The Story of Iranian Jews (closing April 27, 2014).  During the meeting, one of the members, Sandy Lepelstat, mentioned that she and her husband Joe had commissioned a portrait bust of their son, David, from Ludwig Wolpert.  Wolpert made two, one for himself.  Lepelstat asked how she might go about finding out who has the bust Wolpert kept.  Bonni-Dara Michaels, Collections Curator for Yeshiva University Museum, told the Lepelstats that the Museum owns the bust, and brought it down from storage for members to examine. In just one moment, the connection was made. There it was in front of her eyes, the bust of her thirteen year old son.

image

image

A GUIDE FOR THE PERPLEXED - A CONVERSATION WITH DARA HORN 


Monday, January 27, 2014 | 7:30 pm


In her critically acclaimed new novel, A Guide for the Perplexed, Dara Horn uses the Cairo Geniza as the backdrop for a powerful story about our search for knowledge, intimacy and enlightenment. Intertwining the remarkable story of the Geniza’s discovery with a dramatic contemporary tale of a futuristic software program that records everything its users do, A Guide is a riveting story and an insightful meditation on the power and limits of human imagination, as well as on the tension between faith and reason.


Join us for a special conversation with the author in combination with a viewing of Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue. Featured in the exhibition are two manuscripts by Moses Maimonides, including a draft of a portion of his Guide for the Perplexed, one of the greatest philosophical works of the Middle Ages – and an inspiration for Horn’s novelistic tour‐de‐force. Guests are invited to visit the exhibition before the program, beginning at 6:45 pm.


Tickets: $10, general; $7 YUM members, students, seniors
For tickets, go to: www.smarttix.com; or call (212) 868‐4444

A village of havdalah spice boxes #collection #art #judaica #yum #yeshivauniversity #yeshivauniversitymuseum #jews #jewish

A village of havdalah spice boxes #collection #art #judaica #yum #yeshivauniversity #yeshivauniversitymuseum #jews #jewish

The filming of a tiny tombstone #benezra 

The filming of a tiny tombstone #benezra 

SOUND OF THE WRITTEN WORD

DISCUSSION AND PERFORMANCE JUDAH HALEVI IN WORD AND SOUND – POETRY, PIYYUT, AND LITURGY


Monday, January 13, 2014 | 7:00 pm


The writing of Judah Halevi bridges poetry and piyyut, secular text and religious liturgy. Join anthropologist and vocalist Galeet Dardashti, professor Raymond Scheindlin, and cantor Emanuel Shalom, together with musicians, as they trace the origins and cultural context and bring to life – through discussion and performance – the sound of Halevi’s words and poems.


The program complements Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition, Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue. Guests are invited to visit the exhibition before the program, beginning at 5:00 pm.


Co‐presented with the American Sephardi Federation

Tickets: $10, General; $7 YUM, ASF members, students, seniors

For tickets, go to: www.smarttix.com; or call (212) 868‐4444

RETHINKING EXISTING RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS
From YU Museum’s curator.  Follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com
Today, any suggestion about placing a symbol rooted in religion on, in or in front of a public building stirs up a whirlwind of controversy.  Yet, only a few decades ago, such references to the Hebrew bible in particular were common references to what was perceived as the ‘Western’ legal and cultural tradition.  It would be common to see reliefs of Moses beside Socrates, Goethe, and Copernicus on a library or museum. This particular image is on the front of a courthouse in downtown Brooklyn.  YU Museum’s curator offers a way to re-interpret it for today.
Have a wonderful weekend! 
Thanks zcurator!

AND MOSES SAID, “I ORDERD THE TOFU SCRAMBLE! SEE YOU IN COURT!” 
In this one of two reliefs on the facade of the court house in Brooklyn on Adams Street (adjacent to Borough Hall), moses might be seen bringing the Ten Commandments ‘down to the people.’ It is meant to allude to a conception of a western legal tradition rooted in Judeo-Christian text. Yet, inscribing such scenes on public buildings is largely taboo today because they refer to a particular religious tradition, and perhaps can be regarded as perpetuating a theistic vision cosmology. 
HOWEVER, this being Brooklyn, which is perhaps the heart of the great North American brunch tradition today, and considering that we’re living in a particularly litigious moment in American culture, we might understand this image as a Moses so irate that his brunch order was screwed up, that he took the restaurant staff to court.  Yeah, that makes sense. 

RETHINKING EXISTING RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS

From YU Museum’s curator.  Follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com

Today, any suggestion about placing a symbol rooted in religion on, in or in front of a public building stirs up a whirlwind of controversy.  Yet, only a few decades ago, such references to the Hebrew bible in particular were common references to what was perceived as the ‘Western’ legal and cultural tradition.  It would be common to see reliefs of Moses beside Socrates, Goethe, and Copernicus on a library or museum. This particular image is on the front of a courthouse in downtown Brooklyn.  YU Museum’s curator offers a way to re-interpret it for today.

Have a wonderful weekend! 

Thanks zcurator!

AND MOSES SAID, “I ORDERD THE TOFU SCRAMBLE! SEE YOU IN COURT!” 

In this one of two reliefs on the facade of the court house in Brooklyn on Adams Street (adjacent to Borough Hall), moses might be seen bringing the Ten Commandments ‘down to the people.’ It is meant to allude to a conception of a western legal tradition rooted in Judeo-Christian text. Yet, inscribing such scenes on public buildings is largely taboo today because they refer to a particular religious tradition, and perhaps can be regarded as perpetuating a theistic vision cosmology. 

HOWEVER, this being Brooklyn, which is perhaps the heart of the great North American brunch tradition today, and considering that we’re living in a particularly litigious moment in American culture, we might understand this image as a Moses so irate that his brunch order was screwed up, that he took the restaurant staff to court.  Yeah, that makes sense. 

IT’S GETTING HOT OUT THERE, AND IT’S AFTER MEMORIAL DAY!

As heats up, it might be a good time to start wearing white.  But you only have a few months! Even though, wearing white after Labor Day is not necessarily frowned upon anymore, every time I wear white I know that my bubby (grandmother) will say, “No whites after Labor Day!”

(left) White middy blouse with pocket embroidered with three playing cards, black tassel at front neckline, and two buttons.

(right) Uniform. White lab coat with: collar; wrist-length sleeves with button closure; gathered at waist; pocket over right breast inscribed Social Service; 2 pockets in skirt. chest: 17 1/2 in.; waist 12 1/4 in; skirt length waist to hem 24 1/2 in.

Yeshiva University Museum, New York (1999.232) Gift of Lucy Benedikt

TIME TO HIT THE BOOKS-BACK TO SCHOOL!
The first days of school are always filled with great expectations. This year will bring knowledge and inevitably lots of homework. Be prepared this year and achieve your best GPA yet. Just look how studious these girls are in their Brooklyn classroom in 1934.
Slide. Girls Learning in a Classroom. Yeshiva University Museum (2009.555) Gift of Av Rivel

TIME TO HIT THE BOOKS-BACK TO SCHOOL!

The first days of school are always filled with great expectations. This year will bring knowledge and inevitably lots of homework. Be prepared this year and achieve your best GPA yet. Just look how studious these girls are in their Brooklyn classroom in 1934.

Slide. Girls Learning in a Classroom. Yeshiva University Museum (2009.555) Gift of Av Rivel

DREAM BIG OR GO HOME-BACK TO SCHOOL!
College is the opportunity of a lifetime. In addition to providing great friends and inspiring teachers, higher education helps you to nurture your dreams. Dream big this semester…Dream of being an artist like these students!
Photograph showing men and a woman seated in a brightly-lighted room. In the center of their chairs are three benches, one topped by a pot on three feet; the second with a classical bust of a man (the poet Homer); the third with striding lion. An older man stands by the chair of one of the students. At the far end of the room is a six-pointed star above a cabinet containing busts. #37.
Slide. Technicum (Technion) - Drawing [class]. Yeshiva University Museum, New York (2009.435). Gift of Av Rivel

DREAM BIG OR GO HOME-BACK TO SCHOOL!

College is the opportunity of a lifetime. In addition to providing great friends and inspiring teachers, higher education helps you to nurture your dreams. Dream big this semester…Dream of being an artist like these students!

Photograph showing men and a woman seated in a brightly-lighted room. In the center of their chairs are three benches, one topped by a pot on three feet; the second with a classical bust of a man (the poet Homer); the third with striding lion. An older man stands by the chair of one of the students. At the far end of the room is a six-pointed star above a cabinet containing busts. #37.

Slide. Technicum (Technion) - Drawing [class]. Yeshiva University Museum, New York (2009.435). Gift of Av Rivel

A MUSEUM STORY
SOUND OF THE WRITTEN WORD

About:

YU Museum creates new ways to experience and interpret Jewish art and history. It is a source for new ideas and perspectives on historic events and cultural phenomena effecting everyone.

Visit YU Museum’s exhibitions and programs! They open the eyes of audiences to new perspectives on Jewish culture, historic events and cultural phenomena. They reveal the vitality and resonance of present-day art on Jewish themes, and reflect and re-interpret millennia of Jewish experiences for the present. Visit: @15 w16th st, NYC

Visit YU Museum @ www.YUMuseum.org

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