/tagged/Jewish+Art/page/2
There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        
  

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        

  

Ina Golub donated her archive to Yeshiva University Museum and it is now searchable on line! This collection includes maquettes, presentations, documents, photographs, and the banner from her 1996 retrospective exhibition at the Museum.

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

In the city this summer? These watercolor paintings by Albert Dov Sigal are from an archive of many similar, whimsical depictions of different cities, among them Paris, Rome, and Vienna.  Sigal captures some of the essential characteristics of NYC, namely endless construction and corner pizza stores.  

Zak Vreeland, Archivist at the Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation in New York City, recentle identified this bust in the collection of Yeshiva University Museum as Max Grant, leader of the Jewish community in Providence, Rhode Island.Portrait bust of Max GrantArtist:  Chaim Gross (1901-1991)BronzeNew York, 1970Collection of Yeshiva University MuseumGift from the Collection of Gloria and Henry I. Zeisel, Monsey, New York

Zak Vreeland, Archivist at the Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation in New York City, recentle identified this bust in the collection of Yeshiva University Museum as Max Grant, leader of the Jewish community in Providence, Rhode Island.

Portrait bust of Max Grant
Artist:  Chaim Gross (1901-1991)
Bronze
New York, 1970
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum
Gift from the Collection of Gloria and Henry I. Zeisel, Monsey, New York

Monument to A.D. Gordon, by Mimi WeinbergApril 9 to December 28, 2014
Aaron David Gordon (1856 - 1922), commonly known as A. D. Gordon, an early and influential Zionist, was one of the founders of Hapoel Hatzair (The Young Worker), a group active in Palestine in the first decades of the 20th century. This sculpture, created for the YU Museum Sculpture Garden, pays tribute to Gordon by merging motifs evoking the modern agricultural process and the language of ancient structures. Integrating shapes drawn from 20th-century farming equipment with designs based on biblical-era forms, the artist celebrates the longstanding tradition of physical labor within Israeli society.

Monument to A.D. Gordon, by Mimi Weinberg
April 9 to December 28, 2014

Aaron David Gordon (1856 - 1922), commonly known as A. D. Gordon, an early and influential Zionist, was one of the founders of Hapoel Hatzair (The Young Worker), a group active in Palestine in the first decades of the 20th century. This sculpture, created for the YU Museum Sculpture Garden, pays tribute to Gordon by merging motifs evoking the modern agricultural process and the language of ancient structures. Integrating shapes drawn from 20th-century farming equipment with designs based on biblical-era forms, the artist celebrates the longstanding tradition of physical labor within Israeli society.

Where Do YOU Pray?

At the Yeshiva University Museum we recently opened the exhibition, Modeling the Synagogue: From Dura to Touro  (March 27 - August 3, 2014). This exhibition showcases ten scale models of historic synagogues. The models were constructed under the direction of leading scholars and historians, using the most up-to-date research and architectural information. This exhibition marks the first time in two decades that the models have been on display as a group.
We want to see and hear your stories about your own synagogues! Many people have a strong identifications with the place they visit once a week or once a year! Show us on instagram, share your stories on Tumblr, or Tweet us about your Synagogue, shul, or temple!Remember to #MySynagogue and give us a shout out @yumuseum

A MUSEUM STORY

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Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert was a sculptor and designer of Jewish ritual objects and was regarded as the first artist to integrate Hebrew lettering with silver ceremonial objects. He worked in a variety of materials in addition to silver—aluminum and other metals, glass, plastic, wood, and textiles. Originally from  Hildesheim, Germany, Wolpert at an early age, developed an interest in art. From 1916 until 1920, he studied sculpture in Frankfurt-am-Main’s Kunstgewerbeschule, School for Arts and Crafts. After several years of independent work as a sculptor, he returned to the School of Arts and Crafts to study metalwork under a silversmith who had previously taught at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Leo Horowitz. It was then that Wolpert decided to devote himself to Jewish ceremonial art, applying the new trends of that time. 

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 In 1935, he became a professor at the New Bezalel Academy for Arts and Crafts in Jerusalem. His teaching stressed simplicity and functional purity of design, and influenced generations of Israeli artists and craftsmen. 

Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert was recognized in his time by the many commissions he received to create Judaica for synagogues, museums, and other public places, as well as from individuals to commemorate important personal events. Yesterday at the Center for Jewish History the Harry G. Friedman Society, an organization of Judaica collectors, met  for a lecture and tour of Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition Light and Shadows:  The Story of Iranian Jews (closing April 27, 2014).  During the meeting, one of the members, Sandy Lepelstat, mentioned that she and her husband Joe had commissioned a portrait bust of their son, David, from Ludwig Wolpert.  Wolpert made two, one for himself.  Lepelstat asked how she might go about finding out who has the bust Wolpert kept.  Bonni-Dara Michaels, Collections Curator for Yeshiva University Museum, told the Lepelstats that the Museum owns the bust, and brought it down from storage for members to examine. In just one moment, the connection was made. There it was in front of her eyes, the bust of her thirteen year old son.

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A GUIDE FOR THE PERPLEXED - A CONVERSATION WITH DARA HORN 


Monday, January 27, 2014 | 7:30 pm


In her critically acclaimed new novel, A Guide for the Perplexed, Dara Horn uses the Cairo Geniza as the backdrop for a powerful story about our search for knowledge, intimacy and enlightenment. Intertwining the remarkable story of the Geniza’s discovery with a dramatic contemporary tale of a futuristic software program that records everything its users do, A Guide is a riveting story and an insightful meditation on the power and limits of human imagination, as well as on the tension between faith and reason.


Join us for a special conversation with the author in combination with a viewing of Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue. Featured in the exhibition are two manuscripts by Moses Maimonides, including a draft of a portion of his Guide for the Perplexed, one of the greatest philosophical works of the Middle Ages – and an inspiration for Horn’s novelistic tour‐de‐force. Guests are invited to visit the exhibition before the program, beginning at 6:45 pm.


Tickets: $10, general; $7 YUM members, students, seniors
For tickets, go to: www.smarttix.com; or call (212) 868‐4444

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        
  

Andi Arnovitz created this artwork in our collection in 2009 as a reflection of the unease resulting from today’s political and social conflicts.  It mirrors the tumultuous everyday strife in Israel, where Arnovitz lives and works, and the political and social upheaval which dominate and spur global conflict.  It also draws on the pull that a mother feels to protect her child from these conflicts, thus, Vest for a Child of These Times draws its inspiration from an Afghan child’s ceremonial garment.  The vest is embellished with various prayers and kabalistic (Jewish mystical) charms that offer a way of dealing with hardship, other than violence, that echo Arnovitz’s desire to plan and focus on beneficial, rather than, damaging solutions to conflicts.        

  

Ina Golub donated her archive to Yeshiva University Museum and it is now searchable on line! This collection includes maquettes, presentations, documents, photographs, and the banner from her 1996 retrospective exhibition at the Museum.

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

This 2002 photograph by Jaime Permuth depicts a young man in the first Romanian-American synagogue, Congregation Shaarey Shomayim, or the Roumanische Shul, which opened on the Lower East Side in New York City in 1885.  It was nicknamed the “Cantor’s Carnegie Hall” because of its fantastic acoustics and seating for 1,800.  The synagogue, which since 1902 has been located on 89 Rivington Street was torn down in 2006 after water damage cause the roof to collapse.  

In the city this summer? These watercolor paintings by Albert Dov Sigal are from an archive of many similar, whimsical depictions of different cities, among them Paris, Rome, and Vienna.  Sigal captures some of the essential characteristics of NYC, namely endless construction and corner pizza stores.  

Zak Vreeland, Archivist at the Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation in New York City, recentle identified this bust in the collection of Yeshiva University Museum as Max Grant, leader of the Jewish community in Providence, Rhode Island.Portrait bust of Max GrantArtist:  Chaim Gross (1901-1991)BronzeNew York, 1970Collection of Yeshiva University MuseumGift from the Collection of Gloria and Henry I. Zeisel, Monsey, New York

Zak Vreeland, Archivist at the Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation in New York City, recentle identified this bust in the collection of Yeshiva University Museum as Max Grant, leader of the Jewish community in Providence, Rhode Island.

Portrait bust of Max Grant
Artist:  Chaim Gross (1901-1991)
Bronze
New York, 1970
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum
Gift from the Collection of Gloria and Henry I. Zeisel, Monsey, New York

Monument to A.D. Gordon, by Mimi WeinbergApril 9 to December 28, 2014
Aaron David Gordon (1856 - 1922), commonly known as A. D. Gordon, an early and influential Zionist, was one of the founders of Hapoel Hatzair (The Young Worker), a group active in Palestine in the first decades of the 20th century. This sculpture, created for the YU Museum Sculpture Garden, pays tribute to Gordon by merging motifs evoking the modern agricultural process and the language of ancient structures. Integrating shapes drawn from 20th-century farming equipment with designs based on biblical-era forms, the artist celebrates the longstanding tradition of physical labor within Israeli society.

Monument to A.D. Gordon, by Mimi Weinberg
April 9 to December 28, 2014

Aaron David Gordon (1856 - 1922), commonly known as A. D. Gordon, an early and influential Zionist, was one of the founders of Hapoel Hatzair (The Young Worker), a group active in Palestine in the first decades of the 20th century. This sculpture, created for the YU Museum Sculpture Garden, pays tribute to Gordon by merging motifs evoking the modern agricultural process and the language of ancient structures. Integrating shapes drawn from 20th-century farming equipment with designs based on biblical-era forms, the artist celebrates the longstanding tradition of physical labor within Israeli society.

Where Do YOU Pray?

At the Yeshiva University Museum we recently opened the exhibition, Modeling the Synagogue: From Dura to Touro  (March 27 - August 3, 2014). This exhibition showcases ten scale models of historic synagogues. The models were constructed under the direction of leading scholars and historians, using the most up-to-date research and architectural information. This exhibition marks the first time in two decades that the models have been on display as a group.
We want to see and hear your stories about your own synagogues! Many people have a strong identifications with the place they visit once a week or once a year! Show us on instagram, share your stories on Tumblr, or Tweet us about your Synagogue, shul, or temple!Remember to #MySynagogue and give us a shout out @yumuseum

A MUSEUM STORY

image

Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert was a sculptor and designer of Jewish ritual objects and was regarded as the first artist to integrate Hebrew lettering with silver ceremonial objects. He worked in a variety of materials in addition to silver—aluminum and other metals, glass, plastic, wood, and textiles. Originally from  Hildesheim, Germany, Wolpert at an early age, developed an interest in art. From 1916 until 1920, he studied sculpture in Frankfurt-am-Main’s Kunstgewerbeschule, School for Arts and Crafts. After several years of independent work as a sculptor, he returned to the School of Arts and Crafts to study metalwork under a silversmith who had previously taught at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Leo Horowitz. It was then that Wolpert decided to devote himself to Jewish ceremonial art, applying the new trends of that time. 

image

 In 1935, he became a professor at the New Bezalel Academy for Arts and Crafts in Jerusalem. His teaching stressed simplicity and functional purity of design, and influenced generations of Israeli artists and craftsmen. 

Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert was recognized in his time by the many commissions he received to create Judaica for synagogues, museums, and other public places, as well as from individuals to commemorate important personal events. Yesterday at the Center for Jewish History the Harry G. Friedman Society, an organization of Judaica collectors, met  for a lecture and tour of Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition Light and Shadows:  The Story of Iranian Jews (closing April 27, 2014).  During the meeting, one of the members, Sandy Lepelstat, mentioned that she and her husband Joe had commissioned a portrait bust of their son, David, from Ludwig Wolpert.  Wolpert made two, one for himself.  Lepelstat asked how she might go about finding out who has the bust Wolpert kept.  Bonni-Dara Michaels, Collections Curator for Yeshiva University Museum, told the Lepelstats that the Museum owns the bust, and brought it down from storage for members to examine. In just one moment, the connection was made. There it was in front of her eyes, the bust of her thirteen year old son.

image

image

A GUIDE FOR THE PERPLEXED - A CONVERSATION WITH DARA HORN 


Monday, January 27, 2014 | 7:30 pm


In her critically acclaimed new novel, A Guide for the Perplexed, Dara Horn uses the Cairo Geniza as the backdrop for a powerful story about our search for knowledge, intimacy and enlightenment. Intertwining the remarkable story of the Geniza’s discovery with a dramatic contemporary tale of a futuristic software program that records everything its users do, A Guide is a riveting story and an insightful meditation on the power and limits of human imagination, as well as on the tension between faith and reason.


Join us for a special conversation with the author in combination with a viewing of Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue. Featured in the exhibition are two manuscripts by Moses Maimonides, including a draft of a portion of his Guide for the Perplexed, one of the greatest philosophical works of the Middle Ages – and an inspiration for Horn’s novelistic tour‐de‐force. Guests are invited to visit the exhibition before the program, beginning at 6:45 pm.


Tickets: $10, general; $7 YUM members, students, seniors
For tickets, go to: www.smarttix.com; or call (212) 868‐4444

Where Do YOU Pray?
A MUSEUM STORY

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YU Museum creates new ways to experience and interpret Jewish art and history. It is a source for new ideas and perspectives on historic events and cultural phenomena effecting everyone.

Visit YU Museum’s exhibitions and programs! They open the eyes of audiences to new perspectives on Jewish culture, historic events and cultural phenomena. They reveal the vitality and resonance of present-day art on Jewish themes, and reflect and re-interpret millennia of Jewish experiences for the present. Visit: @15 w16th st, NYC

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