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There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.


His Yearning. Varda Rotem  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of the Artist

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning. Varda Rotem  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of the Artist

Two details of a sukkah decoration designed by Siegmund Forst (1904-2006) for the Spero Foundation ca. 1965.  Forst is responsible for many items of material culture that have appeared throughout the years in the Jewish household. This Sukkah decoration is a noteworthy example. In the 1960s, the Spero Foundatio asked Forst to decorate a pre-fabricated sukkah, which he did with fruits, birds, and representation of the seven species of the land of Israel. This Sukkah was produced first in heavy canvas and then in plastic.  These pieces, from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, were the gift of Lynn Broide.

Ready for the High Holidays? It’s unreal how quickly summer goes by.  Almost as soon as it starts, it ends, which for Jewish communities means, getting ready for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.  Interestingly, the summer months are not really times of relaxation in the Jewish Calendar.  In the middle of Tamuz a three week period of mourning and grief begins in preparation for the fast of Av.  Afterwards is the month Elul, a time meant for contemplation and reflection in anticipation of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.  The Shofar, which is used on Rosh Hashanah, is symbolic of this reflection and of repentance.  As Maimonides writes, it is meant to remind people to consider the direction their lives are taking, to think about the goals they want to achieve.  “Wake up, wake up, [you] sleepers from your sleep, and awake [you] slumberers from your slumber,” (Maimonides).

L:  Shofar Altona (?), 1731 horn: engraved, The Max Stern Collection Yeshiva University Museum
C:  Rosh Hashanah postcard produced in Austria by Raphael Tuck & Sons, ca. 1915, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum
R: Detail from Rosh Hashanah by Arthur Szyk (1894-1951) Tempera and ink on paper New Canaan,  1948, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum Gift of Charles Frost

You may not be able to go to Syria, but you will soon be able to visit the Dura Europos Synagogue in our exhibition Modeling the Synagogue from Dura to Touro, opening September 21st.

You may not be able to go to Syria, but you will soon be able to visit the Dura Europos Synagogue in our exhibition Modeling the Synagogue from Dura to Touro, opening September 21st.

Art installer Han van Meeuwen working in the dark to make our model of the Florence Synagogue glow with light for Modeling the Synagogue: From Dura to Touro

Temple model begins its journey to Yeshiva University Museum for Modeling the Synagogue:  From Dura to Touro.

Temple model begins its journey to Yeshiva University Museum for Modeling the Synagogue:  From Dura to Touro.

Keep checking off the days on your calendar; summer is almost gone.  This calendar page showing Ismar David’s distinctive calligraphy was donated to Yeshiva University Museum by Helen Brandshaft. 

Keep checking off the days on your calendar; summer is almost gone.  This calendar page showing Ismar David’s distinctive calligraphy was donated to Yeshiva University Museum by Helen Brandshaft. 

Laura Murlender, a Buenos Aires native, was abducted by Argentina’s military regime when she was nineteen.  From 1976 to 1983, Argentina was under military rule and Jews were one group of people that were targeted for kidnappings and torture.  After her accidental release from solitary confinement, Murlender left Argentina for Tel Aviv.  She was accepted to the Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem where she sought unity and stability through her work.  Through her various pieces and series since 1982, Murlender has been able to depict her move past the barriers she once encountered due to her Jewish identity and enable her overcome her history.  This painting, done in 2007, was shown in YU Museum’s 2007 show, “From Darkness to Light: The paintings of Laura Murlender A “Disappeared” who survived!”  Her work allows Murlender to transition from the darkness that she has experienced to light and to represent and accept her identity and history.  

Time Line I, Laura Murlender (b. 1957), Mixed media, Israel, 2007, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2007.074), Gift of the artist

Laura Murlender, a Buenos Aires native, was abducted by Argentina’s military regime when she was nineteen.  From 1976 to 1983, Argentina was under military rule and Jews were one group of people that were targeted for kidnappings and torture.  After her accidental release from solitary confinement, Murlender left Argentina for Tel Aviv.  She was accepted to the Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem where she sought unity and stability through her work.  Through her various pieces and series since 1982, Murlender has been able to depict her move past the barriers she once encountered due to her Jewish identity and enable her overcome her history.  This painting, done in 2007, was shown in YU Museum’s 2007 show, “From Darkness to Light: The paintings of Laura Murlender A “Disappeared” who survived!”  Her work allows Murlender to transition from the darkness that she has experienced to light and to represent and accept her identity and history.  

Time Line I, Laura Murlender (b. 1957), Mixed media, Israel, 2007, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2007.074), Gift of the artist

Echoes of the Borscht Belt:  Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld opens this Sunday, August 3rd, in Yeshiva University Museum’s Selz Gallery.

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.


His Yearning. Varda Rotem  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of the Artist

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning. Varda Rotem  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of the Artist

Two details of a sukkah decoration designed by Siegmund Forst (1904-2006) for the Spero Foundation ca. 1965.  Forst is responsible for many items of material culture that have appeared throughout the years in the Jewish household. This Sukkah decoration is a noteworthy example. In the 1960s, the Spero Foundatio asked Forst to decorate a pre-fabricated sukkah, which he did with fruits, birds, and representation of the seven species of the land of Israel. This Sukkah was produced first in heavy canvas and then in plastic.  These pieces, from the Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, were the gift of Lynn Broide.

Ready for the High Holidays? It’s unreal how quickly summer goes by.  Almost as soon as it starts, it ends, which for Jewish communities means, getting ready for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.  Interestingly, the summer months are not really times of relaxation in the Jewish Calendar.  In the middle of Tamuz a three week period of mourning and grief begins in preparation for the fast of Av.  Afterwards is the month Elul, a time meant for contemplation and reflection in anticipation of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.  The Shofar, which is used on Rosh Hashanah, is symbolic of this reflection and of repentance.  As Maimonides writes, it is meant to remind people to consider the direction their lives are taking, to think about the goals they want to achieve.  “Wake up, wake up, [you] sleepers from your sleep, and awake [you] slumberers from your slumber,” (Maimonides).

L:  Shofar Altona (?), 1731 horn: engraved, The Max Stern Collection Yeshiva University Museum
C:  Rosh Hashanah postcard produced in Austria by Raphael Tuck & Sons, ca. 1915, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum
R: Detail from Rosh Hashanah by Arthur Szyk (1894-1951) Tempera and ink on paper New Canaan,  1948, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum Gift of Charles Frost

You may not be able to go to Syria, but you will soon be able to visit the Dura Europos Synagogue in our exhibition Modeling the Synagogue from Dura to Touro, opening September 21st.

You may not be able to go to Syria, but you will soon be able to visit the Dura Europos Synagogue in our exhibition Modeling the Synagogue from Dura to Touro, opening September 21st.

Art installer Han van Meeuwen working in the dark to make our model of the Florence Synagogue glow with light for Modeling the Synagogue: From Dura to Touro

Temple model begins its journey to Yeshiva University Museum for Modeling the Synagogue:  From Dura to Touro.

Temple model begins its journey to Yeshiva University Museum for Modeling the Synagogue:  From Dura to Touro.

Keep checking off the days on your calendar; summer is almost gone.  This calendar page showing Ismar David’s distinctive calligraphy was donated to Yeshiva University Museum by Helen Brandshaft. 

Keep checking off the days on your calendar; summer is almost gone.  This calendar page showing Ismar David’s distinctive calligraphy was donated to Yeshiva University Museum by Helen Brandshaft. 

Laura Murlender, a Buenos Aires native, was abducted by Argentina’s military regime when she was nineteen.  From 1976 to 1983, Argentina was under military rule and Jews were one group of people that were targeted for kidnappings and torture.  After her accidental release from solitary confinement, Murlender left Argentina for Tel Aviv.  She was accepted to the Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem where she sought unity and stability through her work.  Through her various pieces and series since 1982, Murlender has been able to depict her move past the barriers she once encountered due to her Jewish identity and enable her overcome her history.  This painting, done in 2007, was shown in YU Museum’s 2007 show, “From Darkness to Light: The paintings of Laura Murlender A “Disappeared” who survived!”  Her work allows Murlender to transition from the darkness that she has experienced to light and to represent and accept her identity and history.  

Time Line I, Laura Murlender (b. 1957), Mixed media, Israel, 2007, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2007.074), Gift of the artist

Laura Murlender, a Buenos Aires native, was abducted by Argentina’s military regime when she was nineteen.  From 1976 to 1983, Argentina was under military rule and Jews were one group of people that were targeted for kidnappings and torture.  After her accidental release from solitary confinement, Murlender left Argentina for Tel Aviv.  She was accepted to the Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem where she sought unity and stability through her work.  Through her various pieces and series since 1982, Murlender has been able to depict her move past the barriers she once encountered due to her Jewish identity and enable her overcome her history.  This painting, done in 2007, was shown in YU Museum’s 2007 show, “From Darkness to Light: The paintings of Laura Murlender A “Disappeared” who survived!”  Her work allows Murlender to transition from the darkness that she has experienced to light and to represent and accept her identity and history.  

Time Line I, Laura Murlender (b. 1957), Mixed media, Israel, 2007, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2007.074), Gift of the artist

Echoes of the Borscht Belt:  Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld opens this Sunday, August 3rd, in Yeshiva University Museum’s Selz Gallery.

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

There is something both comically and tragically familiar in Rotem’s sculpture.  One sees the desperate  scrambling of the depicted figure, and the weight of his load as both a parody and praise of humanity, whose goals are so often larger than themselves.  Rotem’s sculpture captures the farcical comedy of man’s efforts against all odds, while also reflecting the difficulty of perseverance and defeat.

His Yearning by Varda Rotem, 1992.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum.  Gift of the artist

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YU Museum creates new ways to experience and interpret Jewish art and history. It is a source for new ideas and perspectives on historic events and cultural phenomena effecting everyone.

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