/tagged/art/page/12
REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!
The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.
Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!
This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.
Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!

The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.

Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!

This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.

Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

A CURTSY FOR THE OLD DAYS
"Here’s to a dance with dear old Dad.
"Do you remember dancing with your Dad when you were little? I certainly do and I  assume that this girl did as well. I always pretended to be embarrassed but really I enjoyed stepping on his feet and swirling in circles. The girl in the photograph wore this outfit as a play costume in 1940 or 41 but it was originally made in 1901 or 02. This Father’s Day do a curtsy for the old days and enjoy some quality time with your Dad."
- Naomi (Curatorial Intern, YUM)
Black and White Photograph, ca. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1999.176)

A CURTSY FOR THE OLD DAYS

"Here’s to a dance with dear old Dad.

"Do you remember dancing with your Dad when you were little? I certainly do and I  assume that this girl did as well. I always pretended to be embarrassed but really I enjoyed stepping on his feet and swirling in circles. The girl in the photograph wore this outfit as a play costume in 1940 or 41 but it was originally made in 1901 or 02. This Father’s Day do a curtsy for the old days and enjoy some quality time with your Dad."

- Naomi (Curatorial Intern, YUM)

Black and White Photograph, ca. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1999.176)

SEND A POSTCARD … OR A BATIK IF YOU’RE VISITING RACHEL’S TOMB

This textile and postcard depict Rachel’s Tomb, where the matriarch Rachel is believed to be buried.  The tomb is considered one of the holiest places on Earth by Jews, Christians, and Muslims.  Jews have made pilgrimages to the tomb since ancient times, and women in particular visit it to pray for fertility and healthy childbirth.  Some Jews have also taken the tomb as a symbol of the state of Israel and Jewish people’s return to their homeland. 

Postcard: Rachel’s tomb. Copyright Sinai, Tel Aviv, Israel. Postcard made after one of Raban’s Ten Views of Israel published by M. Narkiss and Bezalel in 1931. Inscribed on back that is the pillar of Rachel’s grave unto this day (Gen. 35/20). Rachel holding lamb and Jacob with lamb on shoulders frame tomb.

Rectangular textile decorated with framed image showing road, tree (left), domed building (Rachel’s tomb] center with a figure standing next to it, and a man in streimmel at right.

Postcard, printed.  M. Narkiss and Bezalel, 1931.  Tel Aviv, Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1992.195).

Cotton, printed.  Pro Palestine Association, early 20th century.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2004.080).

CAN YOU SEE IT? LOOK AT THE TORAH ON SHEVUOT AND REMEMBER MT SINAI LIKE IT’S GOING OUT OF STYLE!
As we count down to Shavuot (also known as the Festival of Weeks), this postcard reminds me of the importance of the Torah in Judaism. As the person lifts the Torah up into the air for all to see (also known as Hagba), it is as though the Torah is being given for the first time on the first Shavuot at Mount Sinai. This postcard, from the 20th century, was created by Paul Gruedel in Frankfort. It shows the interior of a synagogue with a focus on the bimah (the elevated platform from which the Torah is read). From the bimah, the person lifting the Torah makes sure that everyone can see, even the smallest of children. The title on the postcard reads Aufheben der Tora or picked up the Torah, which, of course, is a fitting title.  For all of you synagogue-goers out there, make sure to pay attention to the lifting of the Torah and remember that Hagba has a long tradition behind it.
Postcard, 20th Century. Gift from Rachayl David. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.171)

CAN YOU SEE IT? LOOK AT THE TORAH ON SHEVUOT AND REMEMBER MT SINAI LIKE IT’S GOING OUT OF STYLE!

As we count down to Shavuot (also known as the Festival of Weeks), this postcard reminds me of the importance of the Torah in Judaism. As the person lifts the Torah up into the air for all to see (also known as Hagba), it is as though the Torah is being given for the first time on the first Shavuot at Mount Sinai. This postcard, from the 20th century, was created by Paul Gruedel in Frankfort. It shows the interior of a synagogue with a focus on the bimah (the elevated platform from which the Torah is read). From the bimah, the person lifting the Torah makes sure that everyone can see, even the smallest of children. The title on the postcard reads Aufheben der Tora or picked up the Torah, which, of course, is a fitting title.  For all of you synagogue-goers out there, make sure to pay attention to the lifting of the Torah and remember that Hagba has a long tradition behind it.

Postcard, 20th Century. Gift from Rachayl David. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.171)

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA
Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!
In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  
Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA

Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!

In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  

Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

LEAN ON MOM - AND GET READY FOR MOTHER’S DAY ON SUNDAY!
Joseph Floch’s painting Mother and Child portrays a mother with her adult daughter leaning on her shoulder.  The artist’s depiction of the mother’s body—larger than and in front of the daughter’s body—suggests the daughter’s reliance on, if not respect for her mother.  The portrait’s sober palette of dark reds and blues, along with the facial expressions of the two women—the daughter’s contented and the mother’s neutral—suggest they are sharing a moment of quiet reflection.  Floch later gave this painting to his own daughter.
Joseph Floch, ”Mother and Daughter,” 1924.  Oil on canvas.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1983.040).

LEAN ON MOM - AND GET READY FOR MOTHER’S DAY ON SUNDAY!

Joseph Floch’s painting Mother and Child portrays a mother with her adult daughter leaning on her shoulder.  The artist’s depiction of the mother’s body—larger than and in front of the daughter’s body—suggests the daughter’s reliance on, if not respect for her mother.  The portrait’s sober palette of dark reds and blues, along with the facial expressions of the two women—the daughter’s contented and the mother’s neutral—suggest they are sharing a moment of quiet reflection.  Floch later gave this painting to his own daughter.

Joseph Floch, ”Mother and Daughter,” 1924.  Oil on canvas.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1983.040).

MOTHER’S DAY IS SUNDAY! DON’T FORGET!
Images of a mother and child are some of the most familiar scenes in western art. Though often associated with Christian iconography, this image comes out of one of most universal human experiences: a mother holding her child. 
Mother and Child, Isaac Soyer (1907-1981), New York Oil on canvas, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Gabriel Vogelson (1973.008) 
 
Woman with brown hair holding infant wrapped in a blanket.

MOTHER’S DAY IS SUNDAY! DON’T FORGET!

Images of a mother and child are some of the most familiar scenes in western art. Though often associated with Christian iconography, this image comes out of one of most universal human experiences: a mother holding her child. 

Mother and Child, Isaac Soyer (1907-1981), New York Oil on canvas, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Gabriel Vogelson (1973.008) 

 

Woman with brown hair holding infant wrapped in a blanket.

MAMA - I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND
When was the last time you held your mother’s hand?  Try doing it this Mother’s Day, May 13!
This postcard features a photograph of a Tunisian Jewish woman and her daughter holding hands while standing on a shore.  The woman’s robes and conical headdress are representative of the traditional dress of Jewish Tunisian women during the early 20th century. 
Postcard.  Neurdein et Cie.  Paris, France, early 20th century.  Paper, printed.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.232).

MAMA - I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND

When was the last time you held your mother’s hand?  Try doing it this Mother’s Day, May 13!

This postcard features a photograph of a Tunisian Jewish woman and her daughter holding hands while standing on a shore.  The woman’s robes and conical headdress are representative of the traditional dress of Jewish Tunisian women during the early 20th century. 

Postcard.  Neurdein et Cie.  Paris, France, early 20th century.  Paper, printed.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.232).

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!
Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   
Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!

Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   

Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!
The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.
Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!
This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.
Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

REALLY… SUMMER’S COMING… REALLY!!!

The sun will be shining so I’ll get my feet  moving.

Dancing in the summer time can be a sweaty job. But, with the weather we have been having, who can’t help but dance to either take your mind off it, or get ready for it to actually be warm!

This towel with a fringe, from the early 20th century, depicts a Russian folk dance. Their joyous dancing will hopefully inspire you to do a two-step of your own. Remember your sunscreen and water, and, of course, don’t forget your dancing shoes.

Domestic Textile, 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1989.345)

A CURTSY FOR THE OLD DAYS
"Here’s to a dance with dear old Dad.
"Do you remember dancing with your Dad when you were little? I certainly do and I  assume that this girl did as well. I always pretended to be embarrassed but really I enjoyed stepping on his feet and swirling in circles. The girl in the photograph wore this outfit as a play costume in 1940 or 41 but it was originally made in 1901 or 02. This Father’s Day do a curtsy for the old days and enjoy some quality time with your Dad."
- Naomi (Curatorial Intern, YUM)
Black and White Photograph, ca. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1999.176)

A CURTSY FOR THE OLD DAYS

"Here’s to a dance with dear old Dad.

"Do you remember dancing with your Dad when you were little? I certainly do and I  assume that this girl did as well. I always pretended to be embarrassed but really I enjoyed stepping on his feet and swirling in circles. The girl in the photograph wore this outfit as a play costume in 1940 or 41 but it was originally made in 1901 or 02. This Father’s Day do a curtsy for the old days and enjoy some quality time with your Dad."

- Naomi (Curatorial Intern, YUM)

Black and White Photograph, ca. 1940. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum. (1999.176)

SEND A POSTCARD … OR A BATIK IF YOU’RE VISITING RACHEL’S TOMB

This textile and postcard depict Rachel’s Tomb, where the matriarch Rachel is believed to be buried.  The tomb is considered one of the holiest places on Earth by Jews, Christians, and Muslims.  Jews have made pilgrimages to the tomb since ancient times, and women in particular visit it to pray for fertility and healthy childbirth.  Some Jews have also taken the tomb as a symbol of the state of Israel and Jewish people’s return to their homeland. 

Postcard: Rachel’s tomb. Copyright Sinai, Tel Aviv, Israel. Postcard made after one of Raban’s Ten Views of Israel published by M. Narkiss and Bezalel in 1931. Inscribed on back that is the pillar of Rachel’s grave unto this day (Gen. 35/20). Rachel holding lamb and Jacob with lamb on shoulders frame tomb.

Rectangular textile decorated with framed image showing road, tree (left), domed building (Rachel’s tomb] center with a figure standing next to it, and a man in streimmel at right.

Postcard, printed.  M. Narkiss and Bezalel, 1931.  Tel Aviv, Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1992.195).

Cotton, printed.  Pro Palestine Association, early 20th century.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2004.080).

CAN YOU SEE IT? LOOK AT THE TORAH ON SHEVUOT AND REMEMBER MT SINAI LIKE IT’S GOING OUT OF STYLE!
As we count down to Shavuot (also known as the Festival of Weeks), this postcard reminds me of the importance of the Torah in Judaism. As the person lifts the Torah up into the air for all to see (also known as Hagba), it is as though the Torah is being given for the first time on the first Shavuot at Mount Sinai. This postcard, from the 20th century, was created by Paul Gruedel in Frankfort. It shows the interior of a synagogue with a focus on the bimah (the elevated platform from which the Torah is read). From the bimah, the person lifting the Torah makes sure that everyone can see, even the smallest of children. The title on the postcard reads Aufheben der Tora or picked up the Torah, which, of course, is a fitting title.  For all of you synagogue-goers out there, make sure to pay attention to the lifting of the Torah and remember that Hagba has a long tradition behind it.
Postcard, 20th Century. Gift from Rachayl David. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.171)

CAN YOU SEE IT? LOOK AT THE TORAH ON SHEVUOT AND REMEMBER MT SINAI LIKE IT’S GOING OUT OF STYLE!

As we count down to Shavuot (also known as the Festival of Weeks), this postcard reminds me of the importance of the Torah in Judaism. As the person lifts the Torah up into the air for all to see (also known as Hagba), it is as though the Torah is being given for the first time on the first Shavuot at Mount Sinai. This postcard, from the 20th century, was created by Paul Gruedel in Frankfort. It shows the interior of a synagogue with a focus on the bimah (the elevated platform from which the Torah is read). From the bimah, the person lifting the Torah makes sure that everyone can see, even the smallest of children. The title on the postcard reads Aufheben der Tora or picked up the Torah, which, of course, is a fitting title.  For all of you synagogue-goers out there, make sure to pay attention to the lifting of the Torah and remember that Hagba has a long tradition behind it.

Postcard, 20th Century. Gift from Rachayl David. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.171)

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA
Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!
In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  
Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA

Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!

In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  

Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

LEAN ON MOM - AND GET READY FOR MOTHER’S DAY ON SUNDAY!
Joseph Floch’s painting Mother and Child portrays a mother with her adult daughter leaning on her shoulder.  The artist’s depiction of the mother’s body—larger than and in front of the daughter’s body—suggests the daughter’s reliance on, if not respect for her mother.  The portrait’s sober palette of dark reds and blues, along with the facial expressions of the two women—the daughter’s contented and the mother’s neutral—suggest they are sharing a moment of quiet reflection.  Floch later gave this painting to his own daughter.
Joseph Floch, ”Mother and Daughter,” 1924.  Oil on canvas.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1983.040).

LEAN ON MOM - AND GET READY FOR MOTHER’S DAY ON SUNDAY!

Joseph Floch’s painting Mother and Child portrays a mother with her adult daughter leaning on her shoulder.  The artist’s depiction of the mother’s body—larger than and in front of the daughter’s body—suggests the daughter’s reliance on, if not respect for her mother.  The portrait’s sober palette of dark reds and blues, along with the facial expressions of the two women—the daughter’s contented and the mother’s neutral—suggest they are sharing a moment of quiet reflection.  Floch later gave this painting to his own daughter.

Joseph Floch, ”Mother and Daughter,” 1924.  Oil on canvas.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1983.040).

MOTHER’S DAY IS SUNDAY! DON’T FORGET!
Images of a mother and child are some of the most familiar scenes in western art. Though often associated with Christian iconography, this image comes out of one of most universal human experiences: a mother holding her child. 
Mother and Child, Isaac Soyer (1907-1981), New York Oil on canvas, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Gabriel Vogelson (1973.008) 
 
Woman with brown hair holding infant wrapped in a blanket.

MOTHER’S DAY IS SUNDAY! DON’T FORGET!

Images of a mother and child are some of the most familiar scenes in western art. Though often associated with Christian iconography, this image comes out of one of most universal human experiences: a mother holding her child. 

Mother and Child, Isaac Soyer (1907-1981), New York Oil on canvas, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Gabriel Vogelson (1973.008) 

 

Woman with brown hair holding infant wrapped in a blanket.

MAMA - I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND
When was the last time you held your mother’s hand?  Try doing it this Mother’s Day, May 13!
This postcard features a photograph of a Tunisian Jewish woman and her daughter holding hands while standing on a shore.  The woman’s robes and conical headdress are representative of the traditional dress of Jewish Tunisian women during the early 20th century. 
Postcard.  Neurdein et Cie.  Paris, France, early 20th century.  Paper, printed.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.232).

MAMA - I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND

When was the last time you held your mother’s hand?  Try doing it this Mother’s Day, May 13!

This postcard features a photograph of a Tunisian Jewish woman and her daughter holding hands while standing on a shore.  The woman’s robes and conical headdress are representative of the traditional dress of Jewish Tunisian women during the early 20th century. 

Postcard.  Neurdein et Cie.  Paris, France, early 20th century.  Paper, printed.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2006.232).

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!
Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   
Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!

Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   

Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

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