/tagged/art/page/8

FROM YUM’S CURATOR - FOLLOW HIM AT ZCURATOR

zcurator:

STRING VORTEX - FROM IT’S A THIN LINE

I’m working on a program with a colleague on my current exhibition, It’s a Thin Line - the Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond, and I’ve been trying to find an image for the program.  I started working with a shot of one of the art pieces in the gallery, and had a little fun with one of the pictures.  The piece, extruded (an eruv project)by New York artist R. Justin Stewart, is a timeline and map of Manhattan Eruvs from 1907 - 2012. 

This image, taken from the bottom of the sculpture, makes the thousands of strings that comprise the pieces look like a frame from 2001: A Space Odyssey — good or bad.    Anyway, just a little fun, but here’s an image of the original:

extruded (an eruv project), Timeline and Map of Manhattan Eruvs from 1907 - 2012, R. Justin Stewart, New York, 2012, Nylon upholstery thread, jewelry hardware, brass hooks in masonite

FIRST WARM DAY IN NY - WATCH OUT FOR CROCS!
Not the well known shoes, though perhaps you should keep clear if you’re so inclined. 
Today is the first actually warm day in New York in 2013.  If you’re out and about by Union Square, stop on in to YUM.  We’re free from 5-8 pm.  In the meantime, enjoy this wonderful image depicting the ancient Nile in a 1933 Haggadah. 
Haggadah Le-Yeladim / Die Haggadah Des Kindes, by Bernhard-Cohn Silberman, 1933, Berlin, Germany

FIRST WARM DAY IN NY - WATCH OUT FOR CROCS!

Not the well known shoes, though perhaps you should keep clear if you’re so inclined. 

Today is the first actually warm day in New York in 2013.  If you’re out and about by Union Square, stop on in to YUM.  We’re free from 5-8 pm.  In the meantime, enjoy this wonderful image depicting the ancient Nile in a 1933 Haggadah. 

Haggadah Le-Yeladim / Die Haggadah Des Kindes, by Bernhard-Cohn Silberman, 1933, Berlin, Germany

From YUM’s Curator: IS IT RED IF YOU SAY IT’S RED? THIS IS

I’m no typography nerd, but there’s something so pleasing about various orthographic forms placed adjacent to one another in complimentary fonts. 

zcurator.tumblr.com saw this on bitforms:

Yael Kanarek, Wavelength Range of Roughly 630-7540 nm, No. 7,2011

wood, silicone words in five languages: 

English, Hebrew, Arabic, Yiddish and Spanish

diameter 72”  /  182.9 cm

Photo: John Berens

image courtesy bitforms gallery nyc

on view now through Aug 5!

(via zcurator)

NICE BOOK - SHAME IF SOMEONE GOT WHINE ON IT 

These are light and gorgeous drawing that appear in an 18th century manuscript of the Haggadah, the script used on the Jewish holiday Passover, or Pesach.  

The central ceremony for the holiday is the Seder, a meal during which participants symbolically reenact (through food of course!) the story of the ancient Hebrews escape from Egyptian slavery. 

This remarkably well preserved manuscript features a colored cover with the high priest and Moses, prayers written to reference the seven-armed candelabra from the ancient Jewish temple, decorated images of scholars eating the Pascal sacrifice (brisket?), and King David with his harp. 

Illuminated Haggadah and Order for Services for Various Holidays, 1746, Germany, Manuscript, 1984.012

WE WERE ONCE SLAVES 

…But now we’re free. This is the message of Passover, the Jewish holiday celebrating the freedom of the Jews from Ancient Egypt.

These pages are from a 1945 Haggadah (Script for the Passover meal) and they speak specifically to the nature of slavery and freedom. They’re also stunning, sharp images. See more: CJH Catalogue Page

Siegmuch Forst, Ben-Ami Scharfstein, G. Ephros, The Children’s Passover Haggadah, Shilo Publishing House, New York, 1945, 1998.961

IT’S ALIVE! - Learn Hebrew Through Pictures! 

Living Language, the title is the title of this book which teaches young people — like the dandy lad on its cover — how to read and write Hebrew, mostly through pictures. Here’re a few of those pictures.

Published in 1909, at a time when the Hebrew language was rarely spoken outside of religious learning and prayer, this and similar books sought to resurrect what many modern Jews — perhaps the parents of the dandy lad on the cover — regarded as a dead or dying everyday language.  

And why is it here today? Well, it’s almost Pesach (Passover) and the author’s name is Pesach Lev Fishman. So … no relation really.  We just like the picture. 

Safah Chaya, Pesach Lev Fishman, published 1909 by the Hebrew Publishing Company, 1998.895

HOLIDAY SHOPPING FRENZY … IN MARCH  
The frenzied weeks and days (and hours and minutes and seconds) before the Jewish holiday of Passover are often filled with shopping and more shopping.
Here, Israeli artist David Dzienciarski’s Market Before Passover recalls the frenzy in his hometown of Lodz, when the town’s Jews raced to purchase supplies, mostly food, for the holiday meal and the eight days following it. See more from the artist: CJH Catalogue
Judaism requires holiday observers to avoid eating certain foods on Passover, so many Jews will just buy all new food (and plates and table cloths and… and… ) for the holiday.
David Dzienciarski, Market Before Passover, Israel, 1968, 1991.242

HOLIDAY SHOPPING FRENZY … IN MARCH  

The frenzied weeks and days (and hours and minutes and seconds) before the Jewish holiday of Passover are often filled with shopping and more shopping.

Here, Israeli artist David Dzienciarski’s Market Before Passover recalls the frenzy in his hometown of Lodz, when the town’s Jews raced to purchase supplies, mostly food, for the holiday meal and the eight days following it. See more from the artist: CJH Catalogue

Judaism requires holiday observers to avoid eating certain foods on Passover, so many Jews will just buy all new food (and plates and table cloths and… and… ) for the holiday.

David Dzienciarski, Market Before Passover, Israel, 1968, 1991.242

COVER UP — YOUR MATZAH IS SHOWING
And, what better way to cover your Matzah than with this decorative Matzah cover from the early 20th century? Have something similar for your Seder?
The cover features Hebrew and Aramaic excerpts from the Passover meal (the seder), and scenes from then contemporary Eretz Yisrael (at the time British Mandate Palestine), ranging from the ancient western wall of the Holy Temple Mout to a matzah factory. 
Oh, and what’s matzah?  It’s an unleavened bread similar to the heavy bread the ancient Hebrews ate as slaves in Egypt. Jews eat Matzah for the eight days of Passover to commemorate their release from slavery.
Matzah Cover, early 20th Century, Land of Israel, 2004.068  

COVER UP — YOUR MATZAH IS SHOWING

And, what better way to cover your Matzah than with this decorative Matzah cover from the early 20th century? Have something similar for your Seder?

The cover features Hebrew and Aramaic excerpts from the Passover meal (the seder), and scenes from then contemporary Eretz Yisrael (at the time British Mandate Palestine), ranging from the ancient western wall of the Holy Temple Mout to a matzah factory. 

Oh, and what’s matzah?  It’s an unleavened bread similar to the heavy bread the ancient Hebrews ate as slaves in Egypt. Jews eat Matzah for the eight days of Passover to commemorate their release from slavery.

Matzah Cover, early 20th Century, Land of Israel, 2004.068  

SIT DOWN AND GET COMFY — Passover Starts in a week! 

Passover is coming, and it’s a time for resting, reclining and reflecting.  

And why not envision yourself doing that on chairs representing the Egyptian midwives Shifrah and Puah who helped bring up the baby-Moses who later led the Hebrews out of slavery in Egypt?  Right, why not…

HOPE YOU HAD A BALL THIS PURIM!
Though it was last weekend, some folks might still find distinguishing between Mordechai and Haman a little tough, what with that headache and whatnot. Here’s hoping your revelry was healthy and happy!
Image: Purim Ball at the Academy of Music, Illustration from Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly, New York, 1865, the Robert D. Marcus Collection

HOPE YOU HAD A BALL THIS PURIM!

Though it was last weekend, some folks might still find distinguishing between Mordechai and Haman a little tough, what with that headache and whatnot. Here’s hoping your revelry was healthy and happy!

Image: Purim Ball at the Academy of Music, Illustration from Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly, New York, 1865, the Robert D. Marcus Collection


FROM YUM’S CURATOR - FOLLOW HIM AT ZCURATOR

zcurator:

STRING VORTEX - FROM IT’S A THIN LINE

I’m working on a program with a colleague on my current exhibition, It’s a Thin Line - the Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond, and I’ve been trying to find an image for the program.  I started working with a shot of one of the art pieces in the gallery, and had a little fun with one of the pictures.  The piece, extruded (an eruv project)by New York artist R. Justin Stewart, is a timeline and map of Manhattan Eruvs from 1907 - 2012. 

This image, taken from the bottom of the sculpture, makes the thousands of strings that comprise the pieces look like a frame from 2001: A Space Odyssey — good or bad.    Anyway, just a little fun, but here’s an image of the original:

extruded (an eruv project), Timeline and Map of Manhattan Eruvs from 1907 - 2012, R. Justin Stewart, New York, 2012, Nylon upholstery thread, jewelry hardware, brass hooks in masonite

FIRST WARM DAY IN NY - WATCH OUT FOR CROCS!
Not the well known shoes, though perhaps you should keep clear if you’re so inclined. 
Today is the first actually warm day in New York in 2013.  If you’re out and about by Union Square, stop on in to YUM.  We’re free from 5-8 pm.  In the meantime, enjoy this wonderful image depicting the ancient Nile in a 1933 Haggadah. 
Haggadah Le-Yeladim / Die Haggadah Des Kindes, by Bernhard-Cohn Silberman, 1933, Berlin, Germany

FIRST WARM DAY IN NY - WATCH OUT FOR CROCS!

Not the well known shoes, though perhaps you should keep clear if you’re so inclined. 

Today is the first actually warm day in New York in 2013.  If you’re out and about by Union Square, stop on in to YUM.  We’re free from 5-8 pm.  In the meantime, enjoy this wonderful image depicting the ancient Nile in a 1933 Haggadah. 

Haggadah Le-Yeladim / Die Haggadah Des Kindes, by Bernhard-Cohn Silberman, 1933, Berlin, Germany

From YUM’s Curator: IS IT RED IF YOU SAY IT’S RED? THIS IS

I’m no typography nerd, but there’s something so pleasing about various orthographic forms placed adjacent to one another in complimentary fonts. 

zcurator.tumblr.com saw this on bitforms:

Yael Kanarek, Wavelength Range of Roughly 630-7540 nm, No. 7,2011

wood, silicone words in five languages: 

English, Hebrew, Arabic, Yiddish and Spanish

diameter 72”  /  182.9 cm

Photo: John Berens

image courtesy bitforms gallery nyc

on view now through Aug 5!

(via zcurator)

NICE BOOK - SHAME IF SOMEONE GOT WHINE ON IT 

These are light and gorgeous drawing that appear in an 18th century manuscript of the Haggadah, the script used on the Jewish holiday Passover, or Pesach.  

The central ceremony for the holiday is the Seder, a meal during which participants symbolically reenact (through food of course!) the story of the ancient Hebrews escape from Egyptian slavery. 

This remarkably well preserved manuscript features a colored cover with the high priest and Moses, prayers written to reference the seven-armed candelabra from the ancient Jewish temple, decorated images of scholars eating the Pascal sacrifice (brisket?), and King David with his harp. 

Illuminated Haggadah and Order for Services for Various Holidays, 1746, Germany, Manuscript, 1984.012

WE WERE ONCE SLAVES 

…But now we’re free. This is the message of Passover, the Jewish holiday celebrating the freedom of the Jews from Ancient Egypt.

These pages are from a 1945 Haggadah (Script for the Passover meal) and they speak specifically to the nature of slavery and freedom. They’re also stunning, sharp images. See more: CJH Catalogue Page

Siegmuch Forst, Ben-Ami Scharfstein, G. Ephros, The Children’s Passover Haggadah, Shilo Publishing House, New York, 1945, 1998.961

IT’S ALIVE! - Learn Hebrew Through Pictures! 

Living Language, the title is the title of this book which teaches young people — like the dandy lad on its cover — how to read and write Hebrew, mostly through pictures. Here’re a few of those pictures.

Published in 1909, at a time when the Hebrew language was rarely spoken outside of religious learning and prayer, this and similar books sought to resurrect what many modern Jews — perhaps the parents of the dandy lad on the cover — regarded as a dead or dying everyday language.  

And why is it here today? Well, it’s almost Pesach (Passover) and the author’s name is Pesach Lev Fishman. So … no relation really.  We just like the picture. 

Safah Chaya, Pesach Lev Fishman, published 1909 by the Hebrew Publishing Company, 1998.895

HOLIDAY SHOPPING FRENZY … IN MARCH  
The frenzied weeks and days (and hours and minutes and seconds) before the Jewish holiday of Passover are often filled with shopping and more shopping.
Here, Israeli artist David Dzienciarski’s Market Before Passover recalls the frenzy in his hometown of Lodz, when the town’s Jews raced to purchase supplies, mostly food, for the holiday meal and the eight days following it. See more from the artist: CJH Catalogue
Judaism requires holiday observers to avoid eating certain foods on Passover, so many Jews will just buy all new food (and plates and table cloths and… and… ) for the holiday.
David Dzienciarski, Market Before Passover, Israel, 1968, 1991.242

HOLIDAY SHOPPING FRENZY … IN MARCH  

The frenzied weeks and days (and hours and minutes and seconds) before the Jewish holiday of Passover are often filled with shopping and more shopping.

Here, Israeli artist David Dzienciarski’s Market Before Passover recalls the frenzy in his hometown of Lodz, when the town’s Jews raced to purchase supplies, mostly food, for the holiday meal and the eight days following it. See more from the artist: CJH Catalogue

Judaism requires holiday observers to avoid eating certain foods on Passover, so many Jews will just buy all new food (and plates and table cloths and… and… ) for the holiday.

David Dzienciarski, Market Before Passover, Israel, 1968, 1991.242

COVER UP — YOUR MATZAH IS SHOWING
And, what better way to cover your Matzah than with this decorative Matzah cover from the early 20th century? Have something similar for your Seder?
The cover features Hebrew and Aramaic excerpts from the Passover meal (the seder), and scenes from then contemporary Eretz Yisrael (at the time British Mandate Palestine), ranging from the ancient western wall of the Holy Temple Mout to a matzah factory. 
Oh, and what’s matzah?  It’s an unleavened bread similar to the heavy bread the ancient Hebrews ate as slaves in Egypt. Jews eat Matzah for the eight days of Passover to commemorate their release from slavery.
Matzah Cover, early 20th Century, Land of Israel, 2004.068  

COVER UP — YOUR MATZAH IS SHOWING

And, what better way to cover your Matzah than with this decorative Matzah cover from the early 20th century? Have something similar for your Seder?

The cover features Hebrew and Aramaic excerpts from the Passover meal (the seder), and scenes from then contemporary Eretz Yisrael (at the time British Mandate Palestine), ranging from the ancient western wall of the Holy Temple Mout to a matzah factory. 

Oh, and what’s matzah?  It’s an unleavened bread similar to the heavy bread the ancient Hebrews ate as slaves in Egypt. Jews eat Matzah for the eight days of Passover to commemorate their release from slavery.

Matzah Cover, early 20th Century, Land of Israel, 2004.068  

SIT DOWN AND GET COMFY — Passover Starts in a week! 

Passover is coming, and it’s a time for resting, reclining and reflecting.  

And why not envision yourself doing that on chairs representing the Egyptian midwives Shifrah and Puah who helped bring up the baby-Moses who later led the Hebrews out of slavery in Egypt?  Right, why not…

HOPE YOU HAD A BALL THIS PURIM!
Though it was last weekend, some folks might still find distinguishing between Mordechai and Haman a little tough, what with that headache and whatnot. Here’s hoping your revelry was healthy and happy!
Image: Purim Ball at the Academy of Music, Illustration from Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly, New York, 1865, the Robert D. Marcus Collection

HOPE YOU HAD A BALL THIS PURIM!

Though it was last weekend, some folks might still find distinguishing between Mordechai and Haman a little tough, what with that headache and whatnot. Here’s hoping your revelry was healthy and happy!

Image: Purim Ball at the Academy of Music, Illustration from Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly, New York, 1865, the Robert D. Marcus Collection


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Visit YU Museum’s exhibitions and programs! They open the eyes of audiences to new perspectives on Jewish culture, historic events and cultural phenomena. They reveal the vitality and resonance of present-day art on Jewish themes, and reflect and re-interpret millennia of Jewish experiences for the present. Visit: @15 w16th st, NYC

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