/tagged/museum/page/14
GIVING AND RECEIVING
Shavuot is a time to remember when the Israelites stood at the base of Mount Sinai and this is a little reminder. This Torah shield, from 1826/1827, is a representation of the  tablets on which the Ten Commandments are inscribed. It would have been hung around the top of a Torah, thus the reason for the metal chain which extends from the top of the tablets.
Historically, the giving of the Torah happened at Mount Sinai on Shavuot and so it is a time to celebrate. For this reason, Shavuot is also called Hag Matan Torateinu (the Festival of the Giving of the Torah). 
Also known as the Festival of Weeks, Shavuot is one of the three major festivals when the Israelites would have gone to Jerusalem to visit the Temple (the other two are Passover and Sukkot). Shavuot has both agricultural significance and historical significance. In terms of Shavuot’s agricultural significance, it was the time to bring the first fruits of the harvest to the Temple. Thus Shavuot is also called Hag ha-Bikkurim (the Festival of the First Fruit).
It is important to remember that Shavuot is called the “giving” of the Torah, rather then the “receiving” of the Torah. The sages explain that the first time the Torah was “given”.  After that moment of “giving”, the Torah is constantly being “received” every single day. That is why the use of the term “giving” is key to understanding the holiday of Shavuot.
Torah Sheild, 1826/1827. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.298).

GIVING AND RECEIVING

Shavuot is a time to remember when the Israelites stood at the base of Mount Sinai and this is a little reminder. This Torah shield, from 1826/1827, is a representation of the  tablets on which the Ten Commandments are inscribed. It would have been hung around the top of a Torah, thus the reason for the metal chain which extends from the top of the tablets.

Historically, the giving of the Torah happened at Mount Sinai on Shavuot and so it is a time to celebrate. For this reason, Shavuot is also called Hag Matan Torateinu (the Festival of the Giving of the Torah). 

Also known as the Festival of Weeks, Shavuot is one of the three major festivals when the Israelites would have gone to Jerusalem to visit the Temple (the other two are Passover and Sukkot). Shavuot has both agricultural significance and historical significance. In terms of Shavuot’s agricultural significance, it was the time to bring the first fruits of the harvest to the Temple. Thus Shavuot is also called Hag ha-Bikkurim (the Festival of the First Fruit).

It is important to remember that Shavuot is called the “giving” of the Torah, rather then the “receiving” of the Torah. The sages explain that the first time the Torah was “given”.  After that moment of “giving”, the Torah is constantly being “received” every single day. That is why the use of the term “giving” is key to understanding the holiday of Shavuot.

Torah Sheild, 1826/1827. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.298).

Trail of the Magic Bullet: Jewish Bioethics, Secular Bioethics and End of Life Issues6 PM, Thursday, May 17, 2012
Free Admission; Reservations Required: RSVP to programs@yum.cjh.org
Does Jewish bioethics differ from secular bioethics? Is there just one Jewish approach to bioethics? A distinguished panel of leading Jewish clergy and scholars, medical practitioners and bio-ethicists bring different perspectives and approaches to these questions in a lively discussion focused on end of life issues. Preceding the discussion will be a tour with the curator of Trail of the Magic Bullet - The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960, and a special viewing of Heal, You Shall Heal, a film produced for the Trail of the Magic Bullet exhibition at the YU Museum.
6:00pm: Exhibition tour with curator Josh Feinberg (Exhibition info: http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/MagicBullet)
6:30pm: Film screening and panel discussion
PANEL DISCUSSANTS 
Dr. Tia Powell, Director, Montefiore‐Einstein Center for Bioethics; Chair, Bioethics Committee, Montefiore Medical Center
Dr. Kenneth Prager, Director, Clinical Ethics and Chairman of the Medical Ethics Committee of Columbia University Medical Center
Rabbi Richard Weiss, MD, Young Israel of Hillcrest in Queens and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology at Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University

Trail of the Magic Bullet: Jewish Bioethics, Secular Bioethics and End of Life Issues
6 PM, Thursday, May 17, 2012

Free Admission; Reservations Required: RSVP to programs@yum.cjh.org

Does Jewish bioethics differ from secular bioethics? Is there just one Jewish approach to bioethics? A distinguished panel of leading Jewish clergy and scholars, medical practitioners and bio-ethicists bring different perspectives and approaches to these questions in a lively discussion focused on end of life issues. Preceding the discussion will be a tour with the curator of Trail of the Magic Bullet - The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960, and a special viewing of Heal, You Shall Heal, a film produced for the Trail of the Magic Bullet exhibition at the YU Museum.

6:00pm: Exhibition tour with curator Josh Feinberg (Exhibition info: http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/MagicBullet)

6:30pm: Film screening and panel discussion

PANEL DISCUSSANTS 

Dr. Tia Powell, Director, Montefiore‐Einstein Center for Bioethics; Chair, Bioethics Committee, Montefiore Medical Center

Dr. Kenneth Prager, Director, Clinical Ethics and Chairman of the Medical Ethics Committee of Columbia University Medical Center

Rabbi Richard Weiss, MD, Young Israel of Hillcrest in Queens and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology at Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University


SHINE LIKE THE FOUR MATRIARCHS (MOTHERS)
Maybe a card?  A phone call?  A completely loaded Jaguar?  Or maybe you’ll hammer, engrave, and decorate a block of silver for your own mom this Mother’s Day?
This silver amulet, decorated with crystal pendants and garnets, honors the four matriarchs of Judaism.  Both the top and bottom inscriptions read, “Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel Mirah Bat Hannah Gitel.”  
Amulet.  Silver (engraved), garnets, crystal.  1994.  Gift of Robert A. Avrech.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1994.016).

SHINE LIKE THE FOUR MATRIARCHS (MOTHERS)

Maybe a card?  A phone call?  A completely loaded Jaguar?  Or maybe you’ll hammer, engrave, and decorate a block of silver for your own mom this Mother’s Day?

This silver amulet, decorated with crystal pendants and garnets, honors the four matriarchs of Judaism.  Both the top and bottom inscriptions read, “Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel Mirah Bat Hannah Gitel.”  

Amulet.  Silver (engraved), garnets, crystal.  1994.  Gift of Robert A. Avrech.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1994.016).

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA
Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!
In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  
Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA

Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!

In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  

Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

LEAN ON MOM - AND GET READY FOR MOTHER’S DAY ON SUNDAY!
Joseph Floch’s painting Mother and Child portrays a mother with her adult daughter leaning on her shoulder.  The artist’s depiction of the mother’s body—larger than and in front of the daughter’s body—suggests the daughter’s reliance on, if not respect for her mother.  The portrait’s sober palette of dark reds and blues, along with the facial expressions of the two women—the daughter’s contented and the mother’s neutral—suggest they are sharing a moment of quiet reflection.  Floch later gave this painting to his own daughter.
Joseph Floch, ”Mother and Daughter,” 1924.  Oil on canvas.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1983.040).

LEAN ON MOM - AND GET READY FOR MOTHER’S DAY ON SUNDAY!

Joseph Floch’s painting Mother and Child portrays a mother with her adult daughter leaning on her shoulder.  The artist’s depiction of the mother’s body—larger than and in front of the daughter’s body—suggests the daughter’s reliance on, if not respect for her mother.  The portrait’s sober palette of dark reds and blues, along with the facial expressions of the two women—the daughter’s contented and the mother’s neutral—suggest they are sharing a moment of quiet reflection.  Floch later gave this painting to his own daughter.

Joseph Floch, ”Mother and Daughter,” 1924.  Oil on canvas.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1983.040).

MOTHER’S DAY IS SUNDAY! DON’T FORGET!
Images of a mother and child are some of the most familiar scenes in western art. Though often associated with Christian iconography, this image comes out of one of most universal human experiences: a mother holding her child. 
Mother and Child, Isaac Soyer (1907-1981), New York Oil on canvas, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Gabriel Vogelson (1973.008) 
 
Woman with brown hair holding infant wrapped in a blanket.

MOTHER’S DAY IS SUNDAY! DON’T FORGET!

Images of a mother and child are some of the most familiar scenes in western art. Though often associated with Christian iconography, this image comes out of one of most universal human experiences: a mother holding her child. 

Mother and Child, Isaac Soyer (1907-1981), New York Oil on canvas, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Gabriel Vogelson (1973.008) 

 

Woman with brown hair holding infant wrapped in a blanket.

COUNT AWAY AND READY THAT BONFIRE: LAG B’OMER IS TOMORROW!
Take the time this counting of the omer to check out this calendar.
During the time of the Second Temple, there was a commandment to bring a set amount of barley on the second day of Passover. This set amount of barley was known as an omer. After counting 49 days from the giving of the omer, on the 50th day there was a commandment to bring the first offering of the year to theTemple. Although there is no longer a Temple, Jews are still obliged to count the 49 days.
This commandment to count the omer comes from the Biblical verse: “And from the day on which you bring the sheaf of wave offering – the day after the Sabbath – you shall count off seven weeks” (Lev. 23:15). The process of counting led to the creation of calendars to aid in the process of the omer.
This particular calendar (mid 20th century) is written on parchment and is illuminated with different images. The parchments are housed in a case that was made later. There are two knobs on either side for advancing the parchment. The wooden case is decorated with silver appliqué engraving that have the names of the 12 tribes inscribed along with engravings of animals and an abbreviated name of G-d.  There is little known about this calendar, but the initials N.D. is found on the bottom of the case which could perhaps be the name of the owner.
Omer Calendar, 20th Century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (F341)

COUNT AWAY AND READY THAT BONFIRE: LAG B’OMER IS TOMORROW!

Take the time this counting of the omer to check out this calendar.

During the time of the Second Temple, there was a commandment to bring a set amount of barley on the second day of Passover. This set amount of barley was known as an omer. After counting 49 days from the giving of the omer, on the 50th day there was a commandment to bring the first offering of the year to theTemple. Although there is no longer a Temple, Jews are still obliged to count the 49 days.

This commandment to count the omer comes from the Biblical verse: “And from the day on which you bring the sheaf of wave offering – the day after the Sabbath – you shall count off seven weeks” (Lev. 23:15). The process of counting led to the creation of calendars to aid in the process of the omer.

This particular calendar (mid 20th century) is written on parchment and is illuminated with different images. The parchments are housed in a case that was made later. There are two knobs on either side for advancing the parchment. The wooden case is decorated with silver appliqué engraving that have the names of the 12 tribes inscribed along with engravings of animals and an abbreviated name of G-d.  There is little known about this calendar, but the initials N.D. is found on the bottom of the case which could perhaps be the name of the owner.

Omer Calendar, 20th Century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (F341)

TIME FOR A LITTLE ROMANCE

A little bit of poetry to make your day!

With all of his work in politics and educating youth, finding the time to write romantic poetry is no small feat. This book of poetry, Poems from the German, was compiled in the 20th century. This particular poem was written by Johann Ludwig Uhland and is titled “Castle by the Sea”. Uhland is best known for his romantic poetry, but, he was also an attorney and later struggled to restore parliamentary democracy in Wurttenberg in present-day Germany. He also worked a short while as a professor.  You would think that Uhland would be jaded from his work in politics. This poem, which is a portion of a longer poem, shows a softer side to Uhland.

Books & Manuscripts, 1976. New York. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1998.036).

A MOTHER’S LOVE AND UPPER BODY STRENGTH?  PRICELESS.
Tackle your own mom in the waist this Mother’s Day, May 13!
This 50-Lirot silver coin was produced in Israel in 1979.  The front face depicts a mother bouncing a baby in the air while another child embraces her at the waist.  Inscriptions in both English and Hebrew read, “Mother of Children, Psalms 113,9.” 
Silver coin, 1979.  Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2009.160)

A MOTHER’S LOVE AND UPPER BODY STRENGTH?  PRICELESS.

Tackle your own mom in the waist this Mother’s Day, May 13!

This 50-Lirot silver coin was produced in Israel in 1979.  The front face depicts a mother bouncing a baby in the air while another child embraces her at the waist.  Inscriptions in both English and Hebrew read, “Mother of Children, Psalms 113,9.” 

Silver coin, 1979.  Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2009.160)

GIVING AND RECEIVING
Shavuot is a time to remember when the Israelites stood at the base of Mount Sinai and this is a little reminder. This Torah shield, from 1826/1827, is a representation of the  tablets on which the Ten Commandments are inscribed. It would have been hung around the top of a Torah, thus the reason for the metal chain which extends from the top of the tablets.
Historically, the giving of the Torah happened at Mount Sinai on Shavuot and so it is a time to celebrate. For this reason, Shavuot is also called Hag Matan Torateinu (the Festival of the Giving of the Torah). 
Also known as the Festival of Weeks, Shavuot is one of the three major festivals when the Israelites would have gone to Jerusalem to visit the Temple (the other two are Passover and Sukkot). Shavuot has both agricultural significance and historical significance. In terms of Shavuot’s agricultural significance, it was the time to bring the first fruits of the harvest to the Temple. Thus Shavuot is also called Hag ha-Bikkurim (the Festival of the First Fruit).
It is important to remember that Shavuot is called the “giving” of the Torah, rather then the “receiving” of the Torah. The sages explain that the first time the Torah was “given”.  After that moment of “giving”, the Torah is constantly being “received” every single day. That is why the use of the term “giving” is key to understanding the holiday of Shavuot.
Torah Sheild, 1826/1827. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.298).

GIVING AND RECEIVING

Shavuot is a time to remember when the Israelites stood at the base of Mount Sinai and this is a little reminder. This Torah shield, from 1826/1827, is a representation of the  tablets on which the Ten Commandments are inscribed. It would have been hung around the top of a Torah, thus the reason for the metal chain which extends from the top of the tablets.

Historically, the giving of the Torah happened at Mount Sinai on Shavuot and so it is a time to celebrate. For this reason, Shavuot is also called Hag Matan Torateinu (the Festival of the Giving of the Torah). 

Also known as the Festival of Weeks, Shavuot is one of the three major festivals when the Israelites would have gone to Jerusalem to visit the Temple (the other two are Passover and Sukkot). Shavuot has both agricultural significance and historical significance. In terms of Shavuot’s agricultural significance, it was the time to bring the first fruits of the harvest to the Temple. Thus Shavuot is also called Hag ha-Bikkurim (the Festival of the First Fruit).

It is important to remember that Shavuot is called the “giving” of the Torah, rather then the “receiving” of the Torah. The sages explain that the first time the Torah was “given”.  After that moment of “giving”, the Torah is constantly being “received” every single day. That is why the use of the term “giving” is key to understanding the holiday of Shavuot.

Torah Sheild, 1826/1827. Collection of Yeshiva University (1996.298).

Trail of the Magic Bullet: Jewish Bioethics, Secular Bioethics and End of Life Issues6 PM, Thursday, May 17, 2012
Free Admission; Reservations Required: RSVP to programs@yum.cjh.org
Does Jewish bioethics differ from secular bioethics? Is there just one Jewish approach to bioethics? A distinguished panel of leading Jewish clergy and scholars, medical practitioners and bio-ethicists bring different perspectives and approaches to these questions in a lively discussion focused on end of life issues. Preceding the discussion will be a tour with the curator of Trail of the Magic Bullet - The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960, and a special viewing of Heal, You Shall Heal, a film produced for the Trail of the Magic Bullet exhibition at the YU Museum.
6:00pm: Exhibition tour with curator Josh Feinberg (Exhibition info: http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/MagicBullet)
6:30pm: Film screening and panel discussion
PANEL DISCUSSANTS 
Dr. Tia Powell, Director, Montefiore‐Einstein Center for Bioethics; Chair, Bioethics Committee, Montefiore Medical Center
Dr. Kenneth Prager, Director, Clinical Ethics and Chairman of the Medical Ethics Committee of Columbia University Medical Center
Rabbi Richard Weiss, MD, Young Israel of Hillcrest in Queens and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology at Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University

Trail of the Magic Bullet: Jewish Bioethics, Secular Bioethics and End of Life Issues
6 PM, Thursday, May 17, 2012

Free Admission; Reservations Required: RSVP to programs@yum.cjh.org

Does Jewish bioethics differ from secular bioethics? Is there just one Jewish approach to bioethics? A distinguished panel of leading Jewish clergy and scholars, medical practitioners and bio-ethicists bring different perspectives and approaches to these questions in a lively discussion focused on end of life issues. Preceding the discussion will be a tour with the curator of Trail of the Magic Bullet - The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860-1960, and a special viewing of Heal, You Shall Heal, a film produced for the Trail of the Magic Bullet exhibition at the YU Museum.

6:00pm: Exhibition tour with curator Josh Feinberg (Exhibition info: http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/MagicBullet)

6:30pm: Film screening and panel discussion

PANEL DISCUSSANTS 

Dr. Tia Powell, Director, Montefiore‐Einstein Center for Bioethics; Chair, Bioethics Committee, Montefiore Medical Center

Dr. Kenneth Prager, Director, Clinical Ethics and Chairman of the Medical Ethics Committee of Columbia University Medical Center

Rabbi Richard Weiss, MD, Young Israel of Hillcrest in Queens and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology at Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University


SHINE LIKE THE FOUR MATRIARCHS (MOTHERS)
Maybe a card?  A phone call?  A completely loaded Jaguar?  Or maybe you’ll hammer, engrave, and decorate a block of silver for your own mom this Mother’s Day?
This silver amulet, decorated with crystal pendants and garnets, honors the four matriarchs of Judaism.  Both the top and bottom inscriptions read, “Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel Mirah Bat Hannah Gitel.”  
Amulet.  Silver (engraved), garnets, crystal.  1994.  Gift of Robert A. Avrech.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1994.016).

SHINE LIKE THE FOUR MATRIARCHS (MOTHERS)

Maybe a card?  A phone call?  A completely loaded Jaguar?  Or maybe you’ll hammer, engrave, and decorate a block of silver for your own mom this Mother’s Day?

This silver amulet, decorated with crystal pendants and garnets, honors the four matriarchs of Judaism.  Both the top and bottom inscriptions read, “Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel Mirah Bat Hannah Gitel.”  

Amulet.  Silver (engraved), garnets, crystal.  1994.  Gift of Robert A. Avrech.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1994.016).

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA
Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!
In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  
Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA

Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!

In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  

Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

LEAN ON MOM - AND GET READY FOR MOTHER’S DAY ON SUNDAY!
Joseph Floch’s painting Mother and Child portrays a mother with her adult daughter leaning on her shoulder.  The artist’s depiction of the mother’s body—larger than and in front of the daughter’s body—suggests the daughter’s reliance on, if not respect for her mother.  The portrait’s sober palette of dark reds and blues, along with the facial expressions of the two women—the daughter’s contented and the mother’s neutral—suggest they are sharing a moment of quiet reflection.  Floch later gave this painting to his own daughter.
Joseph Floch, ”Mother and Daughter,” 1924.  Oil on canvas.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1983.040).

LEAN ON MOM - AND GET READY FOR MOTHER’S DAY ON SUNDAY!

Joseph Floch’s painting Mother and Child portrays a mother with her adult daughter leaning on her shoulder.  The artist’s depiction of the mother’s body—larger than and in front of the daughter’s body—suggests the daughter’s reliance on, if not respect for her mother.  The portrait’s sober palette of dark reds and blues, along with the facial expressions of the two women—the daughter’s contented and the mother’s neutral—suggest they are sharing a moment of quiet reflection.  Floch later gave this painting to his own daughter.

Joseph Floch, ”Mother and Daughter,” 1924.  Oil on canvas.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1983.040).

MOTHER’S DAY IS SUNDAY! DON’T FORGET!
Images of a mother and child are some of the most familiar scenes in western art. Though often associated with Christian iconography, this image comes out of one of most universal human experiences: a mother holding her child. 
Mother and Child, Isaac Soyer (1907-1981), New York Oil on canvas, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Gabriel Vogelson (1973.008) 
 
Woman with brown hair holding infant wrapped in a blanket.

MOTHER’S DAY IS SUNDAY! DON’T FORGET!

Images of a mother and child are some of the most familiar scenes in western art. Though often associated with Christian iconography, this image comes out of one of most universal human experiences: a mother holding her child. 

Mother and Child, Isaac Soyer (1907-1981), New York Oil on canvas, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Gabriel Vogelson (1973.008) 

 

Woman with brown hair holding infant wrapped in a blanket.

COUNT AWAY AND READY THAT BONFIRE: LAG B’OMER IS TOMORROW!
Take the time this counting of the omer to check out this calendar.
During the time of the Second Temple, there was a commandment to bring a set amount of barley on the second day of Passover. This set amount of barley was known as an omer. After counting 49 days from the giving of the omer, on the 50th day there was a commandment to bring the first offering of the year to theTemple. Although there is no longer a Temple, Jews are still obliged to count the 49 days.
This commandment to count the omer comes from the Biblical verse: “And from the day on which you bring the sheaf of wave offering – the day after the Sabbath – you shall count off seven weeks” (Lev. 23:15). The process of counting led to the creation of calendars to aid in the process of the omer.
This particular calendar (mid 20th century) is written on parchment and is illuminated with different images. The parchments are housed in a case that was made later. There are two knobs on either side for advancing the parchment. The wooden case is decorated with silver appliqué engraving that have the names of the 12 tribes inscribed along with engravings of animals and an abbreviated name of G-d.  There is little known about this calendar, but the initials N.D. is found on the bottom of the case which could perhaps be the name of the owner.
Omer Calendar, 20th Century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (F341)

COUNT AWAY AND READY THAT BONFIRE: LAG B’OMER IS TOMORROW!

Take the time this counting of the omer to check out this calendar.

During the time of the Second Temple, there was a commandment to bring a set amount of barley on the second day of Passover. This set amount of barley was known as an omer. After counting 49 days from the giving of the omer, on the 50th day there was a commandment to bring the first offering of the year to theTemple. Although there is no longer a Temple, Jews are still obliged to count the 49 days.

This commandment to count the omer comes from the Biblical verse: “And from the day on which you bring the sheaf of wave offering – the day after the Sabbath – you shall count off seven weeks” (Lev. 23:15). The process of counting led to the creation of calendars to aid in the process of the omer.

This particular calendar (mid 20th century) is written on parchment and is illuminated with different images. The parchments are housed in a case that was made later. There are two knobs on either side for advancing the parchment. The wooden case is decorated with silver appliqué engraving that have the names of the 12 tribes inscribed along with engravings of animals and an abbreviated name of G-d.  There is little known about this calendar, but the initials N.D. is found on the bottom of the case which could perhaps be the name of the owner.

Omer Calendar, 20th Century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (F341)

TIME FOR A LITTLE ROMANCE

A little bit of poetry to make your day!

With all of his work in politics and educating youth, finding the time to write romantic poetry is no small feat. This book of poetry, Poems from the German, was compiled in the 20th century. This particular poem was written by Johann Ludwig Uhland and is titled “Castle by the Sea”. Uhland is best known for his romantic poetry, but, he was also an attorney and later struggled to restore parliamentary democracy in Wurttenberg in present-day Germany. He also worked a short while as a professor.  You would think that Uhland would be jaded from his work in politics. This poem, which is a portion of a longer poem, shows a softer side to Uhland.

Books & Manuscripts, 1976. New York. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1998.036).

A MOTHER’S LOVE AND UPPER BODY STRENGTH?  PRICELESS.
Tackle your own mom in the waist this Mother’s Day, May 13!
This 50-Lirot silver coin was produced in Israel in 1979.  The front face depicts a mother bouncing a baby in the air while another child embraces her at the waist.  Inscriptions in both English and Hebrew read, “Mother of Children, Psalms 113,9.” 
Silver coin, 1979.  Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2009.160)

A MOTHER’S LOVE AND UPPER BODY STRENGTH?  PRICELESS.

Tackle your own mom in the waist this Mother’s Day, May 13!

This 50-Lirot silver coin was produced in Israel in 1979.  The front face depicts a mother bouncing a baby in the air while another child embraces her at the waist.  Inscriptions in both English and Hebrew read, “Mother of Children, Psalms 113,9.” 

Silver coin, 1979.  Israel.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (2009.160)

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