/tagged/yeshiva+university+museum/page/6
WHAT HAPPENS IN A HOTEL LOBBY … In this 1934 image, the King David Hotel lobby evokes Temple imagery, with its long corridor, stone pillars, and menorah candelabra, which is particularly powerful as it is nearly washed out by the light pouring in from the window.
Yet perhaps more interesting than the physical space itself, is what happened in that space.
Aside for the expected business meetings and family gatherings, the lobby has also surely witnessed countless first dates, both the successful and the awkward and uncomfortable. Arranged dates, known as shidduch dates, are common among Jewish Orthodox and Hasidic communities. In keeping with strict standards of modesty, these dates are held only in very public spaces, making extravagant and open hotel lobbies like this one ideal. 
 King David Hotel - Interior. Jerusalem, 1934, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2009.417
 

WHAT HAPPENS IN A HOTEL LOBBY …

In this 1934 image, the King David Hotel lobby evokes Temple imagery, with its long corridor, stone pillars, and menorah candelabra, which is particularly powerful as it is nearly washed out by the light pouring in from the window.

Yet perhaps more interesting than the physical space itself, is what happened in that space.

Aside for the expected business meetings and family gatherings, the lobby has also surely witnessed countless first dates, both the successful and the awkward and uncomfortable. Arranged dates, known as shidduch dates, are common among Jewish Orthodox and Hasidic communities. In keeping with strict standards of modesty, these dates are held only in very public spaces, making extravagant and open hotel lobbies like this one ideal.

King David Hotel - Interior. Jerusalem, 1934, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2009.417

 

FACES EVERYWHERE - IN BEN-ZION’S HOUSE

From YU Museum’s curator, Zachary Paul Levine.  Follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com:

If an art piece is an artifact of the artist’s world, what happens when the artist’s everyday life comes to resemble the art? 

A few months after I started as a curator at YU Museum, I was invited to look at work in (and all over) the Chelsea home of the abstract painter and sculptor Ben-Zion (1897 - 1987). Every inch of wall in the townhouse was covered with racks of hundreds of painting, sculptures, scrap metal, prints, and layers of curios.  Every object had been placed by the artist to not only create a pleasant and purposeful aesthetic for his living space, but seemed to in fact shape the space into an art piece that looked back you.  This was particularly evident in the dozens of masks leering, grinning, and quietly watching from every wall and corner. All of these were made by the artist.

Though not much of a household name, Ben-Zion was, during his lifetime, an important abstract artist, and notably a member of The Ten, a group of avant-garde artists in the 1930s, which included Mark Rothko, Ilya Bolotowsky, Adolph Gottlieb, and others. Born Benzion Weinman in the Russian Empire (Ukraine), Ben-Zion immigrated to the United States in 1920. Ben-Zion distinguished himself by his embrace of primitivism, and, later on, his treatment of Jewish imagery in both paintings and sculpture. His works are in numerous collections around the world.

I had no clue what to expect during my foray (excursion, safari, I’m not sure what) into his home to meet his widow Lillian. Though I came to look at his Jewish-focused paintings and sculptures, I was struck most by the presence of dozens if not hundreds of masks all over the place. Some were made form salvaged wood with little more that a few holes drilled or dug out to make a face.  Others were pieces of scrap metal, or constructions.  Though most were situated along walls, especially in the basement and garden, some of these faces were nestled with other “objects” like the building’s gas meters and a wall-mounted collection of antique tools. They were on the floor, on the ceiling, in the corners, under furniture.  Everywhere.

What impressed me more was the simplicity of these faces, and how Ben-Zion was capable of so simply defining a face in part of a log, or a castaway piece of rusted steel.  It was as if he took just a few more steps to finish each piece, which had been started for him by another set of unseen forces.

So why do this, why live with so many faces?  Why, I asked Lillian, would he want to live with these objects gazing at him from every corner of his house (did he have one in the toilet even?).  I don’t remember her answer with terrific clarity, but I do recall it had something to do with feeling as if he had company (not in a sad and kind of creepy “Wilson from Cast Away” kind of way).  I got the sense that there was something deeper, though, and that these faces were a gateway for Ben-Zion into the world of those unseen forces that had already done most of the work.  Whether it was the divine, the human spirit, nature, or something otherwise ineffable, I think these faces (and not masks) connected Ben-Zion to something he wanted know was there by seeing it.

Only recently did I get a sense of how much this experience effected the way that I look at art, and present it in galleries and elsewhere.  For my recent project working with students learning about exhibition design, and in fact designing the gallery for the Stern College for Women senior student art exhibition, I suggested that they think about each art piece as an artifact of a world that each artist inhabits — or hopes to inhabit.  That’s not the studio or the gallery, but some place in the artist’s mind. This task was tough for them — it’s a tough task.  How can a person see and experience an artist’s world — either in its totality or even just a small piece of territory?  Some artists are able to create this for us.  Most can’t or do not need to do so. The design class called the exhibition Trespassing  treating the gallery as a chance for the audience to “trespass” into the worlds created by the artists on view. 

Ben-Zion created a world for himself that I’m not sure he meant for most people to see.  I was lucky to have seen it, to feel the stares, gazes and smiles of his acquaintances, which, I think he hoped, would tell me that nowhere are we alone.

RETHINKING EXISTING RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS
From YU Museum’s curator.  Follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com
Today, any suggestion about placing a symbol rooted in religion on, in or in front of a public building stirs up a whirlwind of controversy.  Yet, only a few decades ago, such references to the Hebrew bible in particular were common references to what was perceived as the ‘Western’ legal and cultural tradition.  It would be common to see reliefs of Moses beside Socrates, Goethe, and Copernicus on a library or museum. This particular image is on the front of a courthouse in downtown Brooklyn.  YU Museum’s curator offers a way to re-interpret it for today.
Have a wonderful weekend! 
Thanks zcurator!

AND MOSES SAID, “I ORDERD THE TOFU SCRAMBLE! SEE YOU IN COURT!” 
In this one of two reliefs on the facade of the court house in Brooklyn on Adams Street (adjacent to Borough Hall), moses might be seen bringing the Ten Commandments ‘down to the people.’ It is meant to allude to a conception of a western legal tradition rooted in Judeo-Christian text. Yet, inscribing such scenes on public buildings is largely taboo today because they refer to a particular religious tradition, and perhaps can be regarded as perpetuating a theistic vision cosmology. 
HOWEVER, this being Brooklyn, which is perhaps the heart of the great North American brunch tradition today, and considering that we’re living in a particularly litigious moment in American culture, we might understand this image as a Moses so irate that his brunch order was screwed up, that he took the restaurant staff to court.  Yeah, that makes sense. 

RETHINKING EXISTING RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS

From YU Museum’s curator.  Follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com

Today, any suggestion about placing a symbol rooted in religion on, in or in front of a public building stirs up a whirlwind of controversy.  Yet, only a few decades ago, such references to the Hebrew bible in particular were common references to what was perceived as the ‘Western’ legal and cultural tradition.  It would be common to see reliefs of Moses beside Socrates, Goethe, and Copernicus on a library or museum. This particular image is on the front of a courthouse in downtown Brooklyn.  YU Museum’s curator offers a way to re-interpret it for today.

Have a wonderful weekend! 

Thanks zcurator!

AND MOSES SAID, “I ORDERD THE TOFU SCRAMBLE! SEE YOU IN COURT!” 

In this one of two reliefs on the facade of the court house in Brooklyn on Adams Street (adjacent to Borough Hall), moses might be seen bringing the Ten Commandments ‘down to the people.’ It is meant to allude to a conception of a western legal tradition rooted in Judeo-Christian text. Yet, inscribing such scenes on public buildings is largely taboo today because they refer to a particular religious tradition, and perhaps can be regarded as perpetuating a theistic vision cosmology. 

HOWEVER, this being Brooklyn, which is perhaps the heart of the great North American brunch tradition today, and considering that we’re living in a particularly litigious moment in American culture, we might understand this image as a Moses so irate that his brunch order was screwed up, that he took the restaurant staff to court.  Yeah, that makes sense. 

TRIPPING THE (NO) LIGHT FANTASTIC
Have you taken the time to meditate in a cave, transcend the effable, and commune with the divine?  If not, perhaps Hyman Bloom could be your guide? 
Hyman Bloom, On the Astral Plane:  In a Cave, Charcoal on Paper, 1965. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of the Estate of Ruth Pollan  

TRIPPING THE (NO) LIGHT FANTASTIC

Have you taken the time to meditate in a cave, transcend the effable, and commune with the divine?  If not, perhaps Hyman Bloom could be your guide? 

Hyman Bloom, On the Astral Plane:  In a Cave, Charcoal on Paper, 1965. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of the Estate of Ruth Pollan
  

JEWS AND THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG - JUNE 3 @6 PM

JEWS AND THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG - JUNE 3 @6 PM

Walking tour and conversation, Friday May 31, 2013, 10am – noon
Eruv and Monastery in Dialogue: Exploring Spatial Definitions of Religious Community
Join this exploration of how Jewish and Christian structures shape communities through shared purposes and essential distinctions. Rabbi Adam Mintz, curatorial advisor for the exhibition It’s a Thin Line, and Brother John Glasenapp, OSB, will illuminate historical and experiential aspects of eruv and cloister, and answer questions.
10am: Meet outside the Fort Washington Ave. (upper) entrance to the 190th St. A-train station. We will proceed from the eruv to the monastic architecture in The Cloisters Museum.
Free; Space is limited.
Register: jmusto1@fordham.edu
Co-Presented by Yeshiva University Museum in conjunction with its current exhibition It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond, and The Cloisters Museum.
 

Walking tour and conversation, Friday May 31, 2013, 10am – noon

Eruv and Monastery in Dialogue: Exploring Spatial Definitions of Religious Community

Join this exploration of how Jewish and Christian structures shape communities through shared purposes and essential distinctions. Rabbi Adam Mintz, curatorial advisor for the exhibition It’s a Thin Line, and Brother John Glasenapp, OSB, will illuminate historical and experiential aspects of eruv and cloister, and answer questions.

10am: Meet outside the Fort Washington Ave. (upper) entrance to the 190th St. A-train station. We will proceed from the eruv to the monastic architecture in The Cloisters Museum.

Free; Space is limited.

Register: jmusto1@fordham.edu

Co-Presented by Yeshiva University Museum in conjunction with its current exhibition It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond, and The Cloisters Museum.

 

8 BIT EMBROIDERED PROPHET - PILLOW OF ELIJAH
This wonderful embroidered pillow or wall hanging looks like an 8 bit video game, perhaps a splash screen from the first Zelda or Miracle Warriors (Sega System Fans?).
In fact, depicts Elijah the prophet, a wonderworker in his own time, just beyond the gates of Jerusalem.  Elijah legendarily was sucked up to heaven in a whirlwind — or on a chariot — and occasionally visits the earth.  In Jewish tradition his appearance is supposed to harken the coming of messianic times.
Pillow/Wall hanging depicting the Prophet Elijah, Pauline Fischer, colored thread; ultrasuede on reverse, 1996.396

8 BIT EMBROIDERED PROPHET - PILLOW OF ELIJAH

This wonderful embroidered pillow or wall hanging looks like an 8 bit video game, perhaps a splash screen from the first Zelda or Miracle Warriors (Sega System Fans?).

In fact, depicts Elijah the prophet, a wonderworker in his own time, just beyond the gates of Jerusalem.  Elijah legendarily was sucked up to heaven in a whirlwind — or on a chariot — and occasionally visits the earth.  In Jewish tradition his appearance is supposed to harken the coming of messianic times.

Pillow/Wall hanging depicting the Prophet Elijah, Pauline Fischer, colored thread; ultrasuede on reverse, 1996.396

LINK ARMS AND GET YOUR SISTERS!
It’s all about Jewish women and the Civil War, Monday May 6 at 7 pm. Get your tickets  at Smarttix or call 212-868-4444 for your tickets.

LINK ARMS AND GET YOUR SISTERS!

It’s all about Jewish women and the Civil War, Monday May 6 at 7 pm. Get your tickets  at Smarttix or call 212-868-4444 for your tickets.

WISH WE HAD THIS PLATE
If you could make a Seder plate, or any kind of Judaica, what would it be?
Passover has already passed us over, but it’s not too late for us to admire this fantastic seder plate created by Morgan Levine, who happens to be the sister of YUM’s curator. Check out his post below, and follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com.
Thanks zcurator!

SEDER PLATE FANTASTIC - PLATE
This wonderful Seder plate, created by crafting/pottery phenom (and my sister) Morgan Levine was central to our family’s Seder - the ritual, interactive meal during which Jews re-enact the exodus from Egypt.  
Morgan wanted to produce a version of this plate for years, but doing so presented a surprising number of technical conundrums. It was only thanks to some fruitful collaborations at Maine’s Haystack, the famed ‘summer camp for artists,’ that Morgan was able to produce this otherwise light and airy piece. 
Can’t wait to use it next year!
Thanks morganlevine!

The Seder plate I made last summer making its debut. Happy Passover!!

WISH WE HAD THIS PLATE

If you could make a Seder plate, or any kind of Judaica, what would it be?

Passover has already passed us over, but it’s not too late for us to admire this fantastic seder plate created by Morgan Levine, who happens to be the sister of YUM’s curator. Check out his post below, and follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com.

Thanks zcurator!

SEDER PLATE FANTASTIC - PLATE

This wonderful Seder plate, created by crafting/pottery phenom (and my sister) Morgan Levine was central to our family’s Seder - the ritual, interactive meal during which Jews re-enact the exodus from Egypt.  

Morgan wanted to produce a version of this plate for years, but doing so presented a surprising number of technical conundrums. It was only thanks to some fruitful collaborations at Maine’s Haystack, the famed ‘summer camp for artists,’ that Morgan was able to produce this otherwise light and airy piece. 

Can’t wait to use it next year!

Thanks morganlevine!

The Seder plate I made last summer making its debut. Happy Passover!!

WHAT HAPPENS IN A HOTEL LOBBY … In this 1934 image, the King David Hotel lobby evokes Temple imagery, with its long corridor, stone pillars, and menorah candelabra, which is particularly powerful as it is nearly washed out by the light pouring in from the window.
Yet perhaps more interesting than the physical space itself, is what happened in that space.
Aside for the expected business meetings and family gatherings, the lobby has also surely witnessed countless first dates, both the successful and the awkward and uncomfortable. Arranged dates, known as shidduch dates, are common among Jewish Orthodox and Hasidic communities. In keeping with strict standards of modesty, these dates are held only in very public spaces, making extravagant and open hotel lobbies like this one ideal. 
 King David Hotel - Interior. Jerusalem, 1934, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2009.417
 

WHAT HAPPENS IN A HOTEL LOBBY …

In this 1934 image, the King David Hotel lobby evokes Temple imagery, with its long corridor, stone pillars, and menorah candelabra, which is particularly powerful as it is nearly washed out by the light pouring in from the window.

Yet perhaps more interesting than the physical space itself, is what happened in that space.

Aside for the expected business meetings and family gatherings, the lobby has also surely witnessed countless first dates, both the successful and the awkward and uncomfortable. Arranged dates, known as shidduch dates, are common among Jewish Orthodox and Hasidic communities. In keeping with strict standards of modesty, these dates are held only in very public spaces, making extravagant and open hotel lobbies like this one ideal.

King David Hotel - Interior. Jerusalem, 1934, Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum. 2009.417

 

FACES EVERYWHERE - IN BEN-ZION’S HOUSE

From YU Museum’s curator, Zachary Paul Levine.  Follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com:

If an art piece is an artifact of the artist’s world, what happens when the artist’s everyday life comes to resemble the art? 

A few months after I started as a curator at YU Museum, I was invited to look at work in (and all over) the Chelsea home of the abstract painter and sculptor Ben-Zion (1897 - 1987). Every inch of wall in the townhouse was covered with racks of hundreds of painting, sculptures, scrap metal, prints, and layers of curios.  Every object had been placed by the artist to not only create a pleasant and purposeful aesthetic for his living space, but seemed to in fact shape the space into an art piece that looked back you.  This was particularly evident in the dozens of masks leering, grinning, and quietly watching from every wall and corner. All of these were made by the artist.

Though not much of a household name, Ben-Zion was, during his lifetime, an important abstract artist, and notably a member of The Ten, a group of avant-garde artists in the 1930s, which included Mark Rothko, Ilya Bolotowsky, Adolph Gottlieb, and others. Born Benzion Weinman in the Russian Empire (Ukraine), Ben-Zion immigrated to the United States in 1920. Ben-Zion distinguished himself by his embrace of primitivism, and, later on, his treatment of Jewish imagery in both paintings and sculpture. His works are in numerous collections around the world.

I had no clue what to expect during my foray (excursion, safari, I’m not sure what) into his home to meet his widow Lillian. Though I came to look at his Jewish-focused paintings and sculptures, I was struck most by the presence of dozens if not hundreds of masks all over the place. Some were made form salvaged wood with little more that a few holes drilled or dug out to make a face.  Others were pieces of scrap metal, or constructions.  Though most were situated along walls, especially in the basement and garden, some of these faces were nestled with other “objects” like the building’s gas meters and a wall-mounted collection of antique tools. They were on the floor, on the ceiling, in the corners, under furniture.  Everywhere.

What impressed me more was the simplicity of these faces, and how Ben-Zion was capable of so simply defining a face in part of a log, or a castaway piece of rusted steel.  It was as if he took just a few more steps to finish each piece, which had been started for him by another set of unseen forces.

So why do this, why live with so many faces?  Why, I asked Lillian, would he want to live with these objects gazing at him from every corner of his house (did he have one in the toilet even?).  I don’t remember her answer with terrific clarity, but I do recall it had something to do with feeling as if he had company (not in a sad and kind of creepy “Wilson from Cast Away” kind of way).  I got the sense that there was something deeper, though, and that these faces were a gateway for Ben-Zion into the world of those unseen forces that had already done most of the work.  Whether it was the divine, the human spirit, nature, or something otherwise ineffable, I think these faces (and not masks) connected Ben-Zion to something he wanted know was there by seeing it.

Only recently did I get a sense of how much this experience effected the way that I look at art, and present it in galleries and elsewhere.  For my recent project working with students learning about exhibition design, and in fact designing the gallery for the Stern College for Women senior student art exhibition, I suggested that they think about each art piece as an artifact of a world that each artist inhabits — or hopes to inhabit.  That’s not the studio or the gallery, but some place in the artist’s mind. This task was tough for them — it’s a tough task.  How can a person see and experience an artist’s world — either in its totality or even just a small piece of territory?  Some artists are able to create this for us.  Most can’t or do not need to do so. The design class called the exhibition Trespassing  treating the gallery as a chance for the audience to “trespass” into the worlds created by the artists on view. 

Ben-Zion created a world for himself that I’m not sure he meant for most people to see.  I was lucky to have seen it, to feel the stares, gazes and smiles of his acquaintances, which, I think he hoped, would tell me that nowhere are we alone.

RETHINKING EXISTING RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS
From YU Museum’s curator.  Follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com
Today, any suggestion about placing a symbol rooted in religion on, in or in front of a public building stirs up a whirlwind of controversy.  Yet, only a few decades ago, such references to the Hebrew bible in particular were common references to what was perceived as the ‘Western’ legal and cultural tradition.  It would be common to see reliefs of Moses beside Socrates, Goethe, and Copernicus on a library or museum. This particular image is on the front of a courthouse in downtown Brooklyn.  YU Museum’s curator offers a way to re-interpret it for today.
Have a wonderful weekend! 
Thanks zcurator!

AND MOSES SAID, “I ORDERD THE TOFU SCRAMBLE! SEE YOU IN COURT!” 
In this one of two reliefs on the facade of the court house in Brooklyn on Adams Street (adjacent to Borough Hall), moses might be seen bringing the Ten Commandments ‘down to the people.’ It is meant to allude to a conception of a western legal tradition rooted in Judeo-Christian text. Yet, inscribing such scenes on public buildings is largely taboo today because they refer to a particular religious tradition, and perhaps can be regarded as perpetuating a theistic vision cosmology. 
HOWEVER, this being Brooklyn, which is perhaps the heart of the great North American brunch tradition today, and considering that we’re living in a particularly litigious moment in American culture, we might understand this image as a Moses so irate that his brunch order was screwed up, that he took the restaurant staff to court.  Yeah, that makes sense. 

RETHINKING EXISTING RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS

From YU Museum’s curator.  Follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com

Today, any suggestion about placing a symbol rooted in religion on, in or in front of a public building stirs up a whirlwind of controversy.  Yet, only a few decades ago, such references to the Hebrew bible in particular were common references to what was perceived as the ‘Western’ legal and cultural tradition.  It would be common to see reliefs of Moses beside Socrates, Goethe, and Copernicus on a library or museum. This particular image is on the front of a courthouse in downtown Brooklyn.  YU Museum’s curator offers a way to re-interpret it for today.

Have a wonderful weekend! 

Thanks zcurator!

AND MOSES SAID, “I ORDERD THE TOFU SCRAMBLE! SEE YOU IN COURT!” 

In this one of two reliefs on the facade of the court house in Brooklyn on Adams Street (adjacent to Borough Hall), moses might be seen bringing the Ten Commandments ‘down to the people.’ It is meant to allude to a conception of a western legal tradition rooted in Judeo-Christian text. Yet, inscribing such scenes on public buildings is largely taboo today because they refer to a particular religious tradition, and perhaps can be regarded as perpetuating a theistic vision cosmology. 

HOWEVER, this being Brooklyn, which is perhaps the heart of the great North American brunch tradition today, and considering that we’re living in a particularly litigious moment in American culture, we might understand this image as a Moses so irate that his brunch order was screwed up, that he took the restaurant staff to court.  Yeah, that makes sense. 

TRIPPING THE (NO) LIGHT FANTASTIC
Have you taken the time to meditate in a cave, transcend the effable, and commune with the divine?  If not, perhaps Hyman Bloom could be your guide? 
Hyman Bloom, On the Astral Plane:  In a Cave, Charcoal on Paper, 1965. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of the Estate of Ruth Pollan  

TRIPPING THE (NO) LIGHT FANTASTIC

Have you taken the time to meditate in a cave, transcend the effable, and commune with the divine?  If not, perhaps Hyman Bloom could be your guide? 

Hyman Bloom, On the Astral Plane:  In a Cave, Charcoal on Paper, 1965. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of the Estate of Ruth Pollan
  

JEWS AND THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG - JUNE 3 @6 PM

JEWS AND THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG - JUNE 3 @6 PM

Walking tour and conversation, Friday May 31, 2013, 10am – noon
Eruv and Monastery in Dialogue: Exploring Spatial Definitions of Religious Community
Join this exploration of how Jewish and Christian structures shape communities through shared purposes and essential distinctions. Rabbi Adam Mintz, curatorial advisor for the exhibition It’s a Thin Line, and Brother John Glasenapp, OSB, will illuminate historical and experiential aspects of eruv and cloister, and answer questions.
10am: Meet outside the Fort Washington Ave. (upper) entrance to the 190th St. A-train station. We will proceed from the eruv to the monastic architecture in The Cloisters Museum.
Free; Space is limited.
Register: jmusto1@fordham.edu
Co-Presented by Yeshiva University Museum in conjunction with its current exhibition It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond, and The Cloisters Museum.
 

Walking tour and conversation, Friday May 31, 2013, 10am – noon

Eruv and Monastery in Dialogue: Exploring Spatial Definitions of Religious Community

Join this exploration of how Jewish and Christian structures shape communities through shared purposes and essential distinctions. Rabbi Adam Mintz, curatorial advisor for the exhibition It’s a Thin Line, and Brother John Glasenapp, OSB, will illuminate historical and experiential aspects of eruv and cloister, and answer questions.

10am: Meet outside the Fort Washington Ave. (upper) entrance to the 190th St. A-train station. We will proceed from the eruv to the monastic architecture in The Cloisters Museum.

Free; Space is limited.

Register: jmusto1@fordham.edu

Co-Presented by Yeshiva University Museum in conjunction with its current exhibition It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond, and The Cloisters Museum.

 

8 BIT EMBROIDERED PROPHET - PILLOW OF ELIJAH
This wonderful embroidered pillow or wall hanging looks like an 8 bit video game, perhaps a splash screen from the first Zelda or Miracle Warriors (Sega System Fans?).
In fact, depicts Elijah the prophet, a wonderworker in his own time, just beyond the gates of Jerusalem.  Elijah legendarily was sucked up to heaven in a whirlwind — or on a chariot — and occasionally visits the earth.  In Jewish tradition his appearance is supposed to harken the coming of messianic times.
Pillow/Wall hanging depicting the Prophet Elijah, Pauline Fischer, colored thread; ultrasuede on reverse, 1996.396

8 BIT EMBROIDERED PROPHET - PILLOW OF ELIJAH

This wonderful embroidered pillow or wall hanging looks like an 8 bit video game, perhaps a splash screen from the first Zelda or Miracle Warriors (Sega System Fans?).

In fact, depicts Elijah the prophet, a wonderworker in his own time, just beyond the gates of Jerusalem.  Elijah legendarily was sucked up to heaven in a whirlwind — or on a chariot — and occasionally visits the earth.  In Jewish tradition his appearance is supposed to harken the coming of messianic times.

Pillow/Wall hanging depicting the Prophet Elijah, Pauline Fischer, colored thread; ultrasuede on reverse, 1996.396

LINK ARMS AND GET YOUR SISTERS!
It’s all about Jewish women and the Civil War, Monday May 6 at 7 pm. Get your tickets  at Smarttix or call 212-868-4444 for your tickets.

LINK ARMS AND GET YOUR SISTERS!

It’s all about Jewish women and the Civil War, Monday May 6 at 7 pm. Get your tickets  at Smarttix or call 212-868-4444 for your tickets.

WISH WE HAD THIS PLATE
If you could make a Seder plate, or any kind of Judaica, what would it be?
Passover has already passed us over, but it’s not too late for us to admire this fantastic seder plate created by Morgan Levine, who happens to be the sister of YUM’s curator. Check out his post below, and follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com.
Thanks zcurator!

SEDER PLATE FANTASTIC - PLATE
This wonderful Seder plate, created by crafting/pottery phenom (and my sister) Morgan Levine was central to our family’s Seder - the ritual, interactive meal during which Jews re-enact the exodus from Egypt.  
Morgan wanted to produce a version of this plate for years, but doing so presented a surprising number of technical conundrums. It was only thanks to some fruitful collaborations at Maine’s Haystack, the famed ‘summer camp for artists,’ that Morgan was able to produce this otherwise light and airy piece. 
Can’t wait to use it next year!
Thanks morganlevine!

The Seder plate I made last summer making its debut. Happy Passover!!

WISH WE HAD THIS PLATE

If you could make a Seder plate, or any kind of Judaica, what would it be?

Passover has already passed us over, but it’s not too late for us to admire this fantastic seder plate created by Morgan Levine, who happens to be the sister of YUM’s curator. Check out his post below, and follow him at zcurator.tumblr.com.

Thanks zcurator!

SEDER PLATE FANTASTIC - PLATE

This wonderful Seder plate, created by crafting/pottery phenom (and my sister) Morgan Levine was central to our family’s Seder - the ritual, interactive meal during which Jews re-enact the exodus from Egypt.  

Morgan wanted to produce a version of this plate for years, but doing so presented a surprising number of technical conundrums. It was only thanks to some fruitful collaborations at Maine’s Haystack, the famed ‘summer camp for artists,’ that Morgan was able to produce this otherwise light and airy piece. 

Can’t wait to use it next year!

Thanks morganlevine!

The Seder plate I made last summer making its debut. Happy Passover!!

About:

YU Museum creates new ways to experience and interpret Jewish art and history. It is a source for new ideas and perspectives on historic events and cultural phenomena effecting everyone.

Visit YU Museum’s exhibitions and programs! They open the eyes of audiences to new perspectives on Jewish culture, historic events and cultural phenomena. They reveal the vitality and resonance of present-day art on Jewish themes, and reflect and re-interpret millennia of Jewish experiences for the present. Visit: @15 w16th st, NYC

Visit YU Museum @ www.YUMuseum.org

Following: