/tagged/yeshiva+university+museum/page/6
THIS WEDNESDAY NIGHT! Register here: https://tix.smarttix.com

THIS WEDNESDAY NIGHT! Register here: https://tix.smarttix.com

HOPE YOU HAD A BALL THIS PURIM!
Though it was last weekend, some folks might still find distinguishing between Mordechai and Haman a little tough, what with that headache and whatnot. Here’s hoping your revelry was healthy and happy!
Image: Purim Ball at the Academy of Music, Illustration from Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly, New York, 1865, the Robert D. Marcus Collection

HOPE YOU HAD A BALL THIS PURIM!

Though it was last weekend, some folks might still find distinguishing between Mordechai and Haman a little tough, what with that headache and whatnot. Here’s hoping your revelry was healthy and happy!

Image: Purim Ball at the Academy of Music, Illustration from Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly, New York, 1865, the Robert D. Marcus Collection


STUDENT HANDLE REALLY OLD POTS - NICE…

Archaeology students from YU had an exciting opportunity to get some hands-on experience with some ancient artifacts. Dr. Jill Katz took her students to the YU Museum to examine up-close and personal some old, errr ANCIENT objects from the YUM collection. The students had the opportunity to handle some of the objects, though they had to be very careful. 

It’s a Thin Line: THE VIDEO, NOW ONLINE!

The eruv is one of the most fascinating, though little understood and often controversial concepts in Jewish life. It divides private and public, sacred and secular, the Sabbath from the everyday. As a means for offering separation while integrating into city life, the eruv is also a rich symbol of Jewish life in America.

Among the motivations for creating eruvs is the desire to foster enjoyment of the SAbbath for all Jews, while doing so on a firm basis of Jewish law. This film, which is a compliment to the exhibition at Yeshiva University Museum, features the views and experience of individuals involved in establishing the second and third Manhattan eruvs as well as the perspectives of people who maintain and make use of eruvs elsewhere in the New York area.

With 130 artifacts spanning over five centuries, this exhibition vividly illustrates how an ancient Biblical precept has been creatively interpreted and applied - especially in and around New York City, where, from the late 19th century to the present, the eruv has been dynamically and dramatically adapted and integrated into modern life. A diverse range of objects includes: early Hebrew printed books, century-old images of New York life, contemporary tools and recent eruv artifacts, and eruv—themed works by contemporary artists.

Exhibition Curated by Zachary Paul Levine

TO BUY OR TO SEW — PERHAPS DIY TUESDAY?
Spending lots of money looking for a holiday gift? Consider a sewing machine! This tin advertisement for a Singer sewing machine persuaded women of the early 20th century to create their own garments in order to stretch the family budget. Just in case you are wondering, the Singer sewing machine company is still functioning today! How do we stretch the family budget in the 21st century?
Advertisement for a Sewing Machine. Early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1998.604). Gift of the Jesselson Family.

TO BUY OR TO SEW — PERHAPS DIY TUESDAY?

Spending lots of money looking for a holiday gift? Consider a sewing machine! This tin advertisement for a Singer sewing machine persuaded women of the early 20th century to create their own garments in order to stretch the family budget. Just in case you are wondering, the Singer sewing machine company is still functioning today! How do we stretch the family budget in the 21st century?

Advertisement for a Sewing Machine. Early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1998.604). Gift of the Jesselson Family.

WILL WE HAVE ENOUGH SNOW TO PLAY THIS YEAR? ONLY TIME WILL TELL. WINTER IS HERE!
Time to bundle up and enjoy the beauty of snow covered landscapes. Depicted here are three young children playing in the snow with an orange ball.Drawing.Three Children in Snowsuits. Joseph Hirsch. 1941. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum.

WILL WE HAVE ENOUGH SNOW TO PLAY THIS YEAR? ONLY TIME WILL TELL. WINTER IS HERE!

Time to bundle up and enjoy the beauty of snow covered landscapes. Depicted here are three young children playing in the snow with an orange ball.Drawing.Three Children in Snowsuits. Joseph Hirsch. 1941. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum.

TAKE THE SUBWAY - YUM IS OPEN!
Back after a week hiatus, YU Museum is ready for visitors at 15 W 16th St. Even if your train line is still on the fritz, there’re tons of paths for finding your way here.
One way you could have come about a century ago was on the elevated train, which was dismantled over 60 years ago. This postcard, which appears in YUM’s current exhibition It’s a Thin Line, shows the 2nd and 3rd Avenue elevated train lines coming together at Chatham Square.  At this time, the 3rd Avenue El was the western boarder of the city’s Eruv.  
What’s and Eruv? Find out in the exhibition: It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond
Image: Postcard of New York City Double Deck Elevated Railroad Train at Chatham Square, New York, 1909, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

TAKE THE SUBWAY - YUM IS OPEN!

Back after a week hiatus, YU Museum is ready for visitors at 15 W 16th St. Even if your train line is still on the fritz, there’re tons of paths for finding your way here.

One way you could have come about a century ago was on the elevated train, which was dismantled over 60 years ago. This postcard, which appears in YUM’s current exhibition It’s a Thin Line, shows the 2nd and 3rd Avenue elevated train lines coming together at Chatham Square.  At this time, the 3rd Avenue El was the western boarder of the city’s Eruv.  

What’s and Eruv? Find out in the exhibition: It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond

Image: Postcard of New York City Double Deck Elevated Railroad Train at Chatham Square, New York, 1909, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

IT’S A THIN LINE: THE ERUV AND JEWISH SPACE IN NEW YORK AND BEYOND
Opening October 29th, 2012 
Learn more at http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/ItsAThinLine
From “The Daily Show” to Rabbinic and City Hall Debates, Eruvs Still Generate Controversy. It divides private and public, sacred and secular, work and Sabbath.  And you might live in one without knowing it. With its main focus on New York City, New Jersey, and the surrounding communities, the exhibition also provides a vivid picture of local urban history through the stories of individual communities, religious figures and debates. 
The eruv is one of the most fascinating, though little understood and sometimes controversial concepts in Jewish life.  It is not just a concept.  It’s also a physical creation that powerfully affects the lives of observant Jews.  Without an eruv, parents couldn’t even carry their children on the Sabbath.  It’s a Thin Line traces the history of the eruv and its adaptation into New York’s urban environment, and raises provocative questions. With 130 artifacts spanning over five centuries, It’s a Thin Line vividly illustrates how an ancient Biblical precept has been creatively interpreted and applied – especially in and around New York City.  Objects range from some of the first Hebrew books ever printed to century-old images of New York life to contemporary tools and recent eruv artifacts to eruv­-themed works by contemporary artists.  

IT’S A THIN LINE: THE ERUV AND JEWISH SPACE IN NEW YORK AND BEYOND

Opening October 29th, 2012 

Learn more at http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/ItsAThinLine

From “The Daily Show” to Rabbinic and City Hall Debates, Eruvs Still Generate Controversy. It divides private and public, sacred and secular, work and Sabbath.  And you might live in one without knowing it. With its main focus on New York City, New Jersey, and the surrounding communities, the exhibition also provides a vivid picture of local urban history through the stories of individual communities, religious figures and debates. 

The eruv is one of the most fascinating, though little understood and sometimes controversial concepts in Jewish life.  It is not just a concept.  It’s also a physical creation that powerfully affects the lives of observant Jews.  Without an eruv, parents couldn’t even carry their children on the Sabbath.  It’s a Thin Line traces the history of the eruv and its adaptation into New York’s urban environment, and raises provocative questions. With 130 artifacts spanning over five centuries, It’s a Thin Line vividly illustrates how an ancient Biblical precept has been creatively interpreted and applied – especially in and around New York City.  Objects range from some of the first Hebrew books ever printed to century-old images of New York life to contemporary tools and recent eruv artifacts to eruv­-themed works by contemporary artists.  

Rosh Hashanah- a great time to make political jokes? In this 20th century post card, the head of the rooster used for kapparot is substituted by the face of Tsar Nicholas of Russia.  Apart from celebrating the Jewish new year, this card is an alert to any anti-semitic leader that this is where he/she might end up!  
Rosh Hashanah postcard. YU Museum Collection. Early 20th century (1996.286)

Rosh Hashanah- a great time to make political jokes? In this 20th century post card, the head of the rooster used for kapparot is substituted by the face of Tsar Nicholas of Russia.  Apart from celebrating the Jewish new year, this card is an alert to any anti-semitic leader that this is where he/she might end up!  

Rosh Hashanah postcard. YU Museum Collection. Early 20th century (1996.286)

THEY DONT MAKE THEM LIKE THEY USED TO

These different Rosh Hashanah greetings attest to the utopian characteristics Jews around the globe assigned to the United States. Were they just made to greet American Jews? The largest of these greetings was actually made in Germany, which might indicate that they were not just used for an American Jewish audience.

Shana Tova to all !

 Three Rosh Hashanah greeting cards dating from the 1920s and 1930s. Collection of YU Museum.

THIS WEDNESDAY NIGHT! Register here: https://tix.smarttix.com

THIS WEDNESDAY NIGHT! Register here: https://tix.smarttix.com

HOPE YOU HAD A BALL THIS PURIM!
Though it was last weekend, some folks might still find distinguishing between Mordechai and Haman a little tough, what with that headache and whatnot. Here’s hoping your revelry was healthy and happy!
Image: Purim Ball at the Academy of Music, Illustration from Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly, New York, 1865, the Robert D. Marcus Collection

HOPE YOU HAD A BALL THIS PURIM!

Though it was last weekend, some folks might still find distinguishing between Mordechai and Haman a little tough, what with that headache and whatnot. Here’s hoping your revelry was healthy and happy!

Image: Purim Ball at the Academy of Music, Illustration from Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly, New York, 1865, the Robert D. Marcus Collection


STUDENT HANDLE REALLY OLD POTS - NICE…

Archaeology students from YU had an exciting opportunity to get some hands-on experience with some ancient artifacts. Dr. Jill Katz took her students to the YU Museum to examine up-close and personal some old, errr ANCIENT objects from the YUM collection. The students had the opportunity to handle some of the objects, though they had to be very careful. 

It’s a Thin Line: THE VIDEO, NOW ONLINE!

The eruv is one of the most fascinating, though little understood and often controversial concepts in Jewish life. It divides private and public, sacred and secular, the Sabbath from the everyday. As a means for offering separation while integrating into city life, the eruv is also a rich symbol of Jewish life in America.

Among the motivations for creating eruvs is the desire to foster enjoyment of the SAbbath for all Jews, while doing so on a firm basis of Jewish law. This film, which is a compliment to the exhibition at Yeshiva University Museum, features the views and experience of individuals involved in establishing the second and third Manhattan eruvs as well as the perspectives of people who maintain and make use of eruvs elsewhere in the New York area.

With 130 artifacts spanning over five centuries, this exhibition vividly illustrates how an ancient Biblical precept has been creatively interpreted and applied - especially in and around New York City, where, from the late 19th century to the present, the eruv has been dynamically and dramatically adapted and integrated into modern life. A diverse range of objects includes: early Hebrew printed books, century-old images of New York life, contemporary tools and recent eruv artifacts, and eruv—themed works by contemporary artists.

Exhibition Curated by Zachary Paul Levine

TO BUY OR TO SEW — PERHAPS DIY TUESDAY?
Spending lots of money looking for a holiday gift? Consider a sewing machine! This tin advertisement for a Singer sewing machine persuaded women of the early 20th century to create their own garments in order to stretch the family budget. Just in case you are wondering, the Singer sewing machine company is still functioning today! How do we stretch the family budget in the 21st century?
Advertisement for a Sewing Machine. Early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1998.604). Gift of the Jesselson Family.

TO BUY OR TO SEW — PERHAPS DIY TUESDAY?

Spending lots of money looking for a holiday gift? Consider a sewing machine! This tin advertisement for a Singer sewing machine persuaded women of the early 20th century to create their own garments in order to stretch the family budget. Just in case you are wondering, the Singer sewing machine company is still functioning today! How do we stretch the family budget in the 21st century?

Advertisement for a Sewing Machine. Early 20th century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1998.604). Gift of the Jesselson Family.

WILL WE HAVE ENOUGH SNOW TO PLAY THIS YEAR? ONLY TIME WILL TELL. WINTER IS HERE!
Time to bundle up and enjoy the beauty of snow covered landscapes. Depicted here are three young children playing in the snow with an orange ball.Drawing.Three Children in Snowsuits. Joseph Hirsch. 1941. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum.

WILL WE HAVE ENOUGH SNOW TO PLAY THIS YEAR? ONLY TIME WILL TELL. WINTER IS HERE!

Time to bundle up and enjoy the beauty of snow covered landscapes. Depicted here are three young children playing in the snow with an orange ball.Drawing.Three Children in Snowsuits. Joseph Hirsch. 1941. Collection of the Yeshiva University Museum.

TAKE THE SUBWAY - YUM IS OPEN!
Back after a week hiatus, YU Museum is ready for visitors at 15 W 16th St. Even if your train line is still on the fritz, there’re tons of paths for finding your way here.
One way you could have come about a century ago was on the elevated train, which was dismantled over 60 years ago. This postcard, which appears in YUM’s current exhibition It’s a Thin Line, shows the 2nd and 3rd Avenue elevated train lines coming together at Chatham Square.  At this time, the 3rd Avenue El was the western boarder of the city’s Eruv.  
What’s and Eruv? Find out in the exhibition: It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond
Image: Postcard of New York City Double Deck Elevated Railroad Train at Chatham Square, New York, 1909, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

TAKE THE SUBWAY - YUM IS OPEN!

Back after a week hiatus, YU Museum is ready for visitors at 15 W 16th St. Even if your train line is still on the fritz, there’re tons of paths for finding your way here.

One way you could have come about a century ago was on the elevated train, which was dismantled over 60 years ago. This postcard, which appears in YUM’s current exhibition It’s a Thin Line, shows the 2nd and 3rd Avenue elevated train lines coming together at Chatham Square.  At this time, the 3rd Avenue El was the western boarder of the city’s Eruv.  

What’s and Eruv? Find out in the exhibition: It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond

Image: Postcard of New York City Double Deck Elevated Railroad Train at Chatham Square, New York, 1909, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

IT’S A THIN LINE: THE ERUV AND JEWISH SPACE IN NEW YORK AND BEYOND
Opening October 29th, 2012 
Learn more at http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/ItsAThinLine
From “The Daily Show” to Rabbinic and City Hall Debates, Eruvs Still Generate Controversy. It divides private and public, sacred and secular, work and Sabbath.  And you might live in one without knowing it. With its main focus on New York City, New Jersey, and the surrounding communities, the exhibition also provides a vivid picture of local urban history through the stories of individual communities, religious figures and debates. 
The eruv is one of the most fascinating, though little understood and sometimes controversial concepts in Jewish life.  It is not just a concept.  It’s also a physical creation that powerfully affects the lives of observant Jews.  Without an eruv, parents couldn’t even carry their children on the Sabbath.  It’s a Thin Line traces the history of the eruv and its adaptation into New York’s urban environment, and raises provocative questions. With 130 artifacts spanning over five centuries, It’s a Thin Line vividly illustrates how an ancient Biblical precept has been creatively interpreted and applied – especially in and around New York City.  Objects range from some of the first Hebrew books ever printed to century-old images of New York life to contemporary tools and recent eruv artifacts to eruv­-themed works by contemporary artists.  

IT’S A THIN LINE: THE ERUV AND JEWISH SPACE IN NEW YORK AND BEYOND

Opening October 29th, 2012 

Learn more at http://yumuseum.tumblr.com/ItsAThinLine

From “The Daily Show” to Rabbinic and City Hall Debates, Eruvs Still Generate Controversy. It divides private and public, sacred and secular, work and Sabbath.  And you might live in one without knowing it. With its main focus on New York City, New Jersey, and the surrounding communities, the exhibition also provides a vivid picture of local urban history through the stories of individual communities, religious figures and debates. 

The eruv is one of the most fascinating, though little understood and sometimes controversial concepts in Jewish life.  It is not just a concept.  It’s also a physical creation that powerfully affects the lives of observant Jews.  Without an eruv, parents couldn’t even carry their children on the Sabbath.  It’s a Thin Line traces the history of the eruv and its adaptation into New York’s urban environment, and raises provocative questions. With 130 artifacts spanning over five centuries, It’s a Thin Line vividly illustrates how an ancient Biblical precept has been creatively interpreted and applied – especially in and around New York City.  Objects range from some of the first Hebrew books ever printed to century-old images of New York life to contemporary tools and recent eruv artifacts to eruv­-themed works by contemporary artists.  

Rosh Hashanah- a great time to make political jokes? In this 20th century post card, the head of the rooster used for kapparot is substituted by the face of Tsar Nicholas of Russia.  Apart from celebrating the Jewish new year, this card is an alert to any anti-semitic leader that this is where he/she might end up!  
Rosh Hashanah postcard. YU Museum Collection. Early 20th century (1996.286)

Rosh Hashanah- a great time to make political jokes? In this 20th century post card, the head of the rooster used for kapparot is substituted by the face of Tsar Nicholas of Russia.  Apart from celebrating the Jewish new year, this card is an alert to any anti-semitic leader that this is where he/she might end up!  

Rosh Hashanah postcard. YU Museum Collection. Early 20th century (1996.286)

THEY DONT MAKE THEM LIKE THEY USED TO

These different Rosh Hashanah greetings attest to the utopian characteristics Jews around the globe assigned to the United States. Were they just made to greet American Jews? The largest of these greetings was actually made in Germany, which might indicate that they were not just used for an American Jewish audience.

Shana Tova to all !

 Three Rosh Hashanah greeting cards dating from the 1920s and 1930s. Collection of YU Museum.

About:

YU Museum creates new ways to experience and interpret Jewish art and history. It is a source for new ideas and perspectives on historic events and cultural phenomena effecting everyone.

Visit YU Museum’s exhibitions and programs! They open the eyes of audiences to new perspectives on Jewish culture, historic events and cultural phenomena. They reveal the vitality and resonance of present-day art on Jewish themes, and reflect and re-interpret millennia of Jewish experiences for the present. Visit: @15 w16th st, NYC

Visit YU Museum @ www.YUMuseum.org

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