/tagged/yeshiva/page/7
FROM ‘SILK STONES’, THE VILLAGE BY ROCHELLE RUBINSTEIN 
Patrick McGoohan eat your heart out! This detail from The Village, one of the hit pieces in YUM’s newest exhibition, Silk Stones - Works by Rochelle Rubinstein.  The work features a village that was inspired by Shirpa Village… but in this case the village floats on top of half-visible images from the Book of Kells.  See that mother and child? This village is a kind of homage to Rubinstein’s father’s village in Hungary, Szent Istvan.  
Ok, so you might not find a Rover in this village, but you will find a quiet meditation on the contrasts between the sublime environments and coziness, and the claustrophobia and oppressive nature of of village life.
Check out more images from the exhibition on the Silk Stones show page, or visit the works in person!

FROM ‘SILK STONES’, THE VILLAGE BY ROCHELLE RUBINSTEIN

Patrick McGoohan eat your heart out! This detail from The Village, one of the hit pieces in YUM’s newest exhibition, Silk Stones - Works by Rochelle Rubinstein.  The work features a village that was inspired by Shirpa Village… but in this case the village floats on top of half-visible images from the Book of Kells.  See that mother and child? This village is a kind of homage to Rubinstein’s father’s village in Hungary, Szent Istvan. 

Ok, so you might not find a Rover in this village, but you will find a quiet meditation on the contrasts between the sublime environments and coziness, and the claustrophobia and oppressive nature of of village life.

Check out more images from the exhibition on the Silk Stones show page, or visit the works in person!

NEW JERSEY JEWISH NEWS:

Museum Exhibit to Highlight Medical Legacy of the ‘Beth’
Yeshiva U. curators tap MetroWest collection of hospital artifacts
by Robert WienerNJJN Staff Writer
February 22, 2012
Thanks to the Jewish Historical Society of MetroWest, memorabilia from the 110-year-old Newark Beth Israel Medical Center will highlight an exhibit at the Yeshiva University Museum in New York.
The exhibition, titled “Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine,” will run from Feb. 26 to Aug. 8.
It will include 40 items from the JHS archives, including the hospital’s original charter and minutes from its board meetings, as well as ledgers, photographs, medicine bottles, and nurses’ items from capes to caps.
“For Yeshiva, this was a wonderful thing, because not all archives are as complete as ours,” said JHS executive director Linda Forgosh. “This was a marriage made in heaven. Anything they wanted was fine by us.”
Joshua Feinberg, the project curator, said he and Forgosh began collaborating last August, when he visited the JHS offices on the Aidekman campus in Whippany to examine its trove of artifacts from “the Beth.”
Feinberg called the Beth “a case study of a Jewish hospital, which was founded not only to serve the Jewish community but the broader community as well. It was a gift to the Newark community — not a sectarian institution. It serves everyone and it is a symbol of the Jewish community of having arrived.”
With that legacy in mind, the Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey — which was established from the proceeds of the medical center’s sale in 1998 — gave the museum a $5,000 grant to support the exhibit.
The exhibit takes its title from Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet, a 1940 film about Dr. Paul Ehrlich, who discovered an early treatment for syphilis.
Another medical pioneer who will be prominently featured in the exhibit is Dr. Joseph Goldberger, a Hungarian Jewish physician and epidemiologist employed in the U.S. Public Health Service who studied the connections between disease and poverty and sought a cure for pellagra.
Nurses will get their due as well, in a section devoted to Lillian Wald and the Visiting Nurse Service, which originally served the sick on New York’s Lower East Side.
A final part of the exhibit will be on Hadassah “and its work in Israel and Palestine in the early 20th century,” Feinberg said. “The idea is to use medicine as a lens for looking at the modern Jewish experience.”
Forgosh said she is pleased her organization — which is a beneficiary agency of United Jewish Communities of MetroWest NJ — could play a prominent role in the Yeshiva museum presentation.
“It is especially nice when someone enjoys your collections and is interested in your community’s history,” she said.

NEW JERSEY JEWISH NEWS:

Museum Exhibit to Highlight Medical Legacy of the ‘Beth’

Yeshiva U. curators tap MetroWest collection of hospital artifacts

Thanks to the Jewish Historical Society of MetroWest, memorabilia from the 110-year-old Newark Beth Israel Medical Center will highlight an exhibit at the Yeshiva University Museum in New York.

The exhibition, titled “Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine,” will run from Feb. 26 to Aug. 8.

It will include 40 items from the JHS archives, including the hospital’s original charter and minutes from its board meetings, as well as ledgers, photographs, medicine bottles, and nurses’ items from capes to caps.

“For Yeshiva, this was a wonderful thing, because not all archives are as complete as ours,” said JHS executive director Linda Forgosh. “This was a marriage made in heaven. Anything they wanted was fine by us.”

Joshua Feinberg, the project curator, said he and Forgosh began collaborating last August, when he visited the JHS offices on the Aidekman campus in Whippany to examine its trove of artifacts from “the Beth.”

Feinberg called the Beth “a case study of a Jewish hospital, which was founded not only to serve the Jewish community but the broader community as well. It was a gift to the Newark community — not a sectarian institution. It serves everyone and it is a symbol of the Jewish community of having arrived.”

With that legacy in mind, the Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey — which was established from the proceeds of the medical center’s sale in 1998 — gave the museum a $5,000 grant to support the exhibit.

The exhibit takes its title from Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet, a 1940 film about Dr. Paul Ehrlich, who discovered an early treatment for syphilis.

Another medical pioneer who will be prominently featured in the exhibit is Dr. Joseph Goldberger, a Hungarian Jewish physician and epidemiologist employed in the U.S. Public Health Service who studied the connections between disease and poverty and sought a cure for pellagra.

Nurses will get their due as well, in a section devoted to Lillian Wald and the Visiting Nurse Service, which originally served the sick on New York’s Lower East Side.

A final part of the exhibit will be on Hadassah “and its work in Israel and Palestine in the early 20th century,” Feinberg said. “The idea is to use medicine as a lens for looking at the modern Jewish experience.”

Forgosh said she is pleased her organization — which is a beneficiary agency of United Jewish Communities of MetroWest NJ — could play a prominent role in the Yeshiva museum presentation.

“It is especially nice when someone enjoys your collections and is interested in your community’s history,” she said.

SILK STONES - WORKS BY ROCHELLE RUBINSTEIN
Opening Reception, Sunday March 11, 2-4 pm @ YUMuseum
Like a Baroque sculptor, Rochelle Rubinstein uses materials in ways that delight and deceive the eye. By masking, undermining and transforming the ostensible physical character of objects, she creates surprising visual effects that emphasize the artist’s hand and process. Rubinstein uses multiple techniques – printing and painting, carving and piercing, overlapping and erasing – and re-works individual pieces, often returning to them after a period of months or years. 
 
The subjects in her work are similarly multilayered – and re-interpreted. She blends biblical narratives and culture legends with her own personal stories to create abstract yet recognizable images of family, community and history.  
 
Rochelle Rubinstein is a painter, printmaker, and fabric and book artist. Active in art education in Toronto, where her studio is based, she graduated from Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University as the school’s first Art major.

SILK STONES - WORKS BY ROCHELLE RUBINSTEIN

Opening Reception, Sunday March 11, 2-4 pm @ YUMuseum

Like a Baroque sculptor, Rochelle Rubinstein uses materials in ways that delight and deceive the eye. By masking, undermining and transforming the ostensible physical character of objects, she creates surprising visual effects that emphasize the artist’s hand and process. Rubinstein uses multiple techniques – printing and painting, carving and piercing, overlapping and erasing – and re-works individual pieces, often returning to them after a period of months or years.

 

The subjects in her work are similarly multilayered – and re-interpreted. She blends biblical narratives and culture legends with her own personal stories to create abstract yet recognizable images of family, community and history.  

 

Rochelle Rubinstein is a painter, printmaker, and fabric and book artist. Active in art education in Toronto, where her studio is based, she graduated from Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University as the school’s first Art major.

WHO LEFT THE PAINT ROLLER IN THE FRIDGE?
Exhibition installations can be a bit crazy and the craziness can spill out of the gallery – in this case, into the fridge.

WHO LEFT THE PAINT ROLLER IN THE FRIDGE?

Exhibition installations can be a bit crazy and the craziness can spill out of the gallery – in this case, into the fridge.

HELP FIX YUM’S YELP REVIEWS
Friends, for whatever reason, the folks at Yelp are suppressing the positive review of Yeshiva University Museum, and leaving up the one negative—and really uninformed—review of our small museum.  Can you help us right the wrong of this algorithm?  If you have something to share about YUM, please lend us a few minutes and leave it on YUM’s Yelp page. Positive or negative, we’d just like something constructive and fair.  And we will make every effort to get back to you with our own questions and solutions to the problems you identify.
You can find YUM’s Yelp Page here: http://www.yelp.com/biz/yeshiva-university-museum-new-york
Thanks a bunch folks!

HELP FIX YUM’S YELP REVIEWS

Friends, for whatever reason, the folks at Yelp are suppressing the positive review of Yeshiva University Museum, and leaving up the one negative—and really uninformed—review of our small museum.  Can you help us right the wrong of this algorithm?  If you have something to share about YUM, please lend us a few minutes and leave it on YUM’s Yelp page. Positive or negative, we’d just like something constructive and fair.  And we will make every effort to get back to you with our own questions and solutions to the problems you identify.

You can find YUM’s Yelp Page here: http://www.yelp.com/biz/yeshiva-university-museum-new-york

Thanks a bunch folks!

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 3
Continuing with our tree-birthday fortnight, imagine yourself sauntering down this date grove in Rishon Le-Zion, one of the earliest Zionist agricultural settlements in the land of Israel.  If you’re lucky, the warm wispy wind might carry the sweet smell of ripening dates.  Yum!
Rishon-le-Zion Publisher:  Moshe Ordmann Tel Aviv, ca. 1918 Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC# 1995.043

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 3

Continuing with our tree-birthday fortnight, imagine yourself sauntering down this date grove in Rishon Le-Zion, one of the earliest Zionist agricultural settlements in the land of Israel.  If you’re lucky, the warm wispy wind might carry the sweet smell of ripening dates.  Yum!

Rishon-le-Zion
Publisher:  Moshe Ordmann
Tel Aviv, ca. 1918
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC#
1995.043

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 2
Ah, moonshine in Jericho shimmering off the trees.  Not THAT moonshine you know!
Today we know Jericho as a bustling Palestinian metropolis near the banks of the Dead Sea. But the name also rings out as uber-historical, appearing in the bible and in countless other stories.  But this region also possesses a mystical quality that seems to radiate intensely at night.  This image of a moonlit building in Jericho from 1918 hints at that quality.  The building looks at once solid and familiar but also otherworldly. Indeed, the trees almost appear as apparitions emanating toward heaven.
Moonshine in Jericho Publisher: J. Benor-Kalter Jerusalem, early 20th century Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC# 2001.115

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 2

Ah, moonshine in Jericho shimmering off the trees.  Not THAT moonshine you know!

Today we know Jericho as a bustling Palestinian metropolis near the banks of the Dead Sea. But the name also rings out as uber-historical, appearing in the bible and in countless other stories.  But this region also possesses a mystical quality that seems to radiate intensely at night.  This image of a moonlit building in Jericho from 1918 hints at that quality.  The building looks at once solid and familiar but also otherworldly. Indeed, the trees almost appear as apparitions emanating toward heaven.

Moonshine in Jericho
Publisher: J. Benor-Kalter
Jerusalem, early 20th century
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC#
2001.115

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 1
So, Tu B’Shvat, the birthday for the trees (Lorax, eat your heart out!) was just last week.  Hopefully you’re over that blast of amaretto.  But, just in case you need a slight reminder, check out this century+ old postcard of an almond grove.
Almond Trees Publisher:  Moshe Ordmann Tel Aviv, ca. 1918Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC #1995.039

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 1

So, Tu B’Shvat, the birthday for the trees (Lorax, eat your heart out!) was just last week.  Hopefully you’re over that blast of amaretto.  But, just in case you need a slight reminder, check out this century+ old postcard of an almond grove.

Almond Trees
Publisher:  Moshe Ordmann
Tel Aviv, ca. 1918
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC #1995.039

Quintan Ana Wikswo reads THE LITTLE KRETSCHMAR

from Tin House magazine (Winter 2012 issue)

January 13, 2012
New York City, NY
Yeshiva University Museum

EMERGING OVERWHELMING BEAUTY - The Golden City/Upper Galilee
Hiking in a valley just bellow Tzfat, the sunlight shimmers the small, mystical city.  Quietude underscores sublimity, broken by stream trickles, bird flutters, and trees rustling in the mountain breeze. Then again, you’d be hard-pressed to find any camels in that part of Israel these days…
Thanks as always 16thstreet!

From the partners’ collections: The Golden City/Upper Galilee
Description: Landscape. Camels lower left, yellow buildings top center, surrounded by green; inscribed reverse: “Ruth Bamberger with Love for Kathrin”Artist: Bamberger, Ruth, 1906-1976Medium: Painting, oil on canvasDate: 1969Persistent URL: digital.cjh.org/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=413013Repository: The Kathryn Yochelson Collection Yeshiva University MuseumAccession number: 2001.396Rights statement: Click here.
Visit our Flickr photostream for more from the partners’ collections.

EMERGING OVERWHELMING BEAUTY - The Golden City/Upper Galilee

Hiking in a valley just bellow Tzfat, the sunlight shimmers the small, mystical city.  Quietude underscores sublimity, broken by stream trickles, bird flutters, and trees rustling in the mountain breeze. Then again, you’d be hard-pressed to find any camels in that part of Israel these days…

Thanks as always 16thstreet!

From the partners’ collections: The Golden City/Upper Galilee

Description: Landscape. Camels lower left, yellow buildings top center, surrounded by green; inscribed reverse: “Ruth Bamberger with Love for Kathrin”
Artist: Bamberger, Ruth, 1906-1976
Medium: Painting, oil on canvas
Date: 1969
Persistent URL: digital.cjh.org/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=413013
Repository: The Kathryn Yochelson Collection Yeshiva University Museum
Accession number: 2001.396
Rights statement: Click here.

Visit our Flickr photostream for more from the partners’ collections.

FROM ‘SILK STONES’, THE VILLAGE BY ROCHELLE RUBINSTEIN 
Patrick McGoohan eat your heart out! This detail from The Village, one of the hit pieces in YUM’s newest exhibition, Silk Stones - Works by Rochelle Rubinstein.  The work features a village that was inspired by Shirpa Village… but in this case the village floats on top of half-visible images from the Book of Kells.  See that mother and child? This village is a kind of homage to Rubinstein’s father’s village in Hungary, Szent Istvan.  
Ok, so you might not find a Rover in this village, but you will find a quiet meditation on the contrasts between the sublime environments and coziness, and the claustrophobia and oppressive nature of of village life.
Check out more images from the exhibition on the Silk Stones show page, or visit the works in person!

FROM ‘SILK STONES’, THE VILLAGE BY ROCHELLE RUBINSTEIN

Patrick McGoohan eat your heart out! This detail from The Village, one of the hit pieces in YUM’s newest exhibition, Silk Stones - Works by Rochelle Rubinstein.  The work features a village that was inspired by Shirpa Village… but in this case the village floats on top of half-visible images from the Book of Kells.  See that mother and child? This village is a kind of homage to Rubinstein’s father’s village in Hungary, Szent Istvan. 

Ok, so you might not find a Rover in this village, but you will find a quiet meditation on the contrasts between the sublime environments and coziness, and the claustrophobia and oppressive nature of of village life.

Check out more images from the exhibition on the Silk Stones show page, or visit the works in person!

NEW JERSEY JEWISH NEWS:

Museum Exhibit to Highlight Medical Legacy of the ‘Beth’
Yeshiva U. curators tap MetroWest collection of hospital artifacts
by Robert WienerNJJN Staff Writer
February 22, 2012
Thanks to the Jewish Historical Society of MetroWest, memorabilia from the 110-year-old Newark Beth Israel Medical Center will highlight an exhibit at the Yeshiva University Museum in New York.
The exhibition, titled “Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine,” will run from Feb. 26 to Aug. 8.
It will include 40 items from the JHS archives, including the hospital’s original charter and minutes from its board meetings, as well as ledgers, photographs, medicine bottles, and nurses’ items from capes to caps.
“For Yeshiva, this was a wonderful thing, because not all archives are as complete as ours,” said JHS executive director Linda Forgosh. “This was a marriage made in heaven. Anything they wanted was fine by us.”
Joshua Feinberg, the project curator, said he and Forgosh began collaborating last August, when he visited the JHS offices on the Aidekman campus in Whippany to examine its trove of artifacts from “the Beth.”
Feinberg called the Beth “a case study of a Jewish hospital, which was founded not only to serve the Jewish community but the broader community as well. It was a gift to the Newark community — not a sectarian institution. It serves everyone and it is a symbol of the Jewish community of having arrived.”
With that legacy in mind, the Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey — which was established from the proceeds of the medical center’s sale in 1998 — gave the museum a $5,000 grant to support the exhibit.
The exhibit takes its title from Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet, a 1940 film about Dr. Paul Ehrlich, who discovered an early treatment for syphilis.
Another medical pioneer who will be prominently featured in the exhibit is Dr. Joseph Goldberger, a Hungarian Jewish physician and epidemiologist employed in the U.S. Public Health Service who studied the connections between disease and poverty and sought a cure for pellagra.
Nurses will get their due as well, in a section devoted to Lillian Wald and the Visiting Nurse Service, which originally served the sick on New York’s Lower East Side.
A final part of the exhibit will be on Hadassah “and its work in Israel and Palestine in the early 20th century,” Feinberg said. “The idea is to use medicine as a lens for looking at the modern Jewish experience.”
Forgosh said she is pleased her organization — which is a beneficiary agency of United Jewish Communities of MetroWest NJ — could play a prominent role in the Yeshiva museum presentation.
“It is especially nice when someone enjoys your collections and is interested in your community’s history,” she said.

NEW JERSEY JEWISH NEWS:

Museum Exhibit to Highlight Medical Legacy of the ‘Beth’

Yeshiva U. curators tap MetroWest collection of hospital artifacts

Thanks to the Jewish Historical Society of MetroWest, memorabilia from the 110-year-old Newark Beth Israel Medical Center will highlight an exhibit at the Yeshiva University Museum in New York.

The exhibition, titled “Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine,” will run from Feb. 26 to Aug. 8.

It will include 40 items from the JHS archives, including the hospital’s original charter and minutes from its board meetings, as well as ledgers, photographs, medicine bottles, and nurses’ items from capes to caps.

“For Yeshiva, this was a wonderful thing, because not all archives are as complete as ours,” said JHS executive director Linda Forgosh. “This was a marriage made in heaven. Anything they wanted was fine by us.”

Joshua Feinberg, the project curator, said he and Forgosh began collaborating last August, when he visited the JHS offices on the Aidekman campus in Whippany to examine its trove of artifacts from “the Beth.”

Feinberg called the Beth “a case study of a Jewish hospital, which was founded not only to serve the Jewish community but the broader community as well. It was a gift to the Newark community — not a sectarian institution. It serves everyone and it is a symbol of the Jewish community of having arrived.”

With that legacy in mind, the Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey — which was established from the proceeds of the medical center’s sale in 1998 — gave the museum a $5,000 grant to support the exhibit.

The exhibit takes its title from Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet, a 1940 film about Dr. Paul Ehrlich, who discovered an early treatment for syphilis.

Another medical pioneer who will be prominently featured in the exhibit is Dr. Joseph Goldberger, a Hungarian Jewish physician and epidemiologist employed in the U.S. Public Health Service who studied the connections between disease and poverty and sought a cure for pellagra.

Nurses will get their due as well, in a section devoted to Lillian Wald and the Visiting Nurse Service, which originally served the sick on New York’s Lower East Side.

A final part of the exhibit will be on Hadassah “and its work in Israel and Palestine in the early 20th century,” Feinberg said. “The idea is to use medicine as a lens for looking at the modern Jewish experience.”

Forgosh said she is pleased her organization — which is a beneficiary agency of United Jewish Communities of MetroWest NJ — could play a prominent role in the Yeshiva museum presentation.

“It is especially nice when someone enjoys your collections and is interested in your community’s history,” she said.

SILK STONES - WORKS BY ROCHELLE RUBINSTEIN
Opening Reception, Sunday March 11, 2-4 pm @ YUMuseum
Like a Baroque sculptor, Rochelle Rubinstein uses materials in ways that delight and deceive the eye. By masking, undermining and transforming the ostensible physical character of objects, she creates surprising visual effects that emphasize the artist’s hand and process. Rubinstein uses multiple techniques – printing and painting, carving and piercing, overlapping and erasing – and re-works individual pieces, often returning to them after a period of months or years. 
 
The subjects in her work are similarly multilayered – and re-interpreted. She blends biblical narratives and culture legends with her own personal stories to create abstract yet recognizable images of family, community and history.  
 
Rochelle Rubinstein is a painter, printmaker, and fabric and book artist. Active in art education in Toronto, where her studio is based, she graduated from Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University as the school’s first Art major.

SILK STONES - WORKS BY ROCHELLE RUBINSTEIN

Opening Reception, Sunday March 11, 2-4 pm @ YUMuseum

Like a Baroque sculptor, Rochelle Rubinstein uses materials in ways that delight and deceive the eye. By masking, undermining and transforming the ostensible physical character of objects, she creates surprising visual effects that emphasize the artist’s hand and process. Rubinstein uses multiple techniques – printing and painting, carving and piercing, overlapping and erasing – and re-works individual pieces, often returning to them after a period of months or years.

 

The subjects in her work are similarly multilayered – and re-interpreted. She blends biblical narratives and culture legends with her own personal stories to create abstract yet recognizable images of family, community and history.  

 

Rochelle Rubinstein is a painter, printmaker, and fabric and book artist. Active in art education in Toronto, where her studio is based, she graduated from Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University as the school’s first Art major.

WHO LEFT THE PAINT ROLLER IN THE FRIDGE?
Exhibition installations can be a bit crazy and the craziness can spill out of the gallery – in this case, into the fridge.

WHO LEFT THE PAINT ROLLER IN THE FRIDGE?

Exhibition installations can be a bit crazy and the craziness can spill out of the gallery – in this case, into the fridge.

HELP FIX YUM’S YELP REVIEWS
Friends, for whatever reason, the folks at Yelp are suppressing the positive review of Yeshiva University Museum, and leaving up the one negative—and really uninformed—review of our small museum.  Can you help us right the wrong of this algorithm?  If you have something to share about YUM, please lend us a few minutes and leave it on YUM’s Yelp page. Positive or negative, we’d just like something constructive and fair.  And we will make every effort to get back to you with our own questions and solutions to the problems you identify.
You can find YUM’s Yelp Page here: http://www.yelp.com/biz/yeshiva-university-museum-new-york
Thanks a bunch folks!

HELP FIX YUM’S YELP REVIEWS

Friends, for whatever reason, the folks at Yelp are suppressing the positive review of Yeshiva University Museum, and leaving up the one negative—and really uninformed—review of our small museum.  Can you help us right the wrong of this algorithm?  If you have something to share about YUM, please lend us a few minutes and leave it on YUM’s Yelp page. Positive or negative, we’d just like something constructive and fair.  And we will make every effort to get back to you with our own questions and solutions to the problems you identify.

You can find YUM’s Yelp Page here: http://www.yelp.com/biz/yeshiva-university-museum-new-york

Thanks a bunch folks!

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 3
Continuing with our tree-birthday fortnight, imagine yourself sauntering down this date grove in Rishon Le-Zion, one of the earliest Zionist agricultural settlements in the land of Israel.  If you’re lucky, the warm wispy wind might carry the sweet smell of ripening dates.  Yum!
Rishon-le-Zion Publisher:  Moshe Ordmann Tel Aviv, ca. 1918 Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC# 1995.043

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 3

Continuing with our tree-birthday fortnight, imagine yourself sauntering down this date grove in Rishon Le-Zion, one of the earliest Zionist agricultural settlements in the land of Israel.  If you’re lucky, the warm wispy wind might carry the sweet smell of ripening dates.  Yum!

Rishon-le-Zion
Publisher:  Moshe Ordmann
Tel Aviv, ca. 1918
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC#
1995.043

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 2
Ah, moonshine in Jericho shimmering off the trees.  Not THAT moonshine you know!
Today we know Jericho as a bustling Palestinian metropolis near the banks of the Dead Sea. But the name also rings out as uber-historical, appearing in the bible and in countless other stories.  But this region also possesses a mystical quality that seems to radiate intensely at night.  This image of a moonlit building in Jericho from 1918 hints at that quality.  The building looks at once solid and familiar but also otherworldly. Indeed, the trees almost appear as apparitions emanating toward heaven.
Moonshine in Jericho Publisher: J. Benor-Kalter Jerusalem, early 20th century Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC# 2001.115

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 2

Ah, moonshine in Jericho shimmering off the trees.  Not THAT moonshine you know!

Today we know Jericho as a bustling Palestinian metropolis near the banks of the Dead Sea. But the name also rings out as uber-historical, appearing in the bible and in countless other stories.  But this region also possesses a mystical quality that seems to radiate intensely at night.  This image of a moonlit building in Jericho from 1918 hints at that quality.  The building looks at once solid and familiar but also otherworldly. Indeed, the trees almost appear as apparitions emanating toward heaven.

Moonshine in Jericho
Publisher: J. Benor-Kalter
Jerusalem, early 20th century
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC#
2001.115

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 1
So, Tu B’Shvat, the birthday for the trees (Lorax, eat your heart out!) was just last week.  Hopefully you’re over that blast of amaretto.  But, just in case you need a slight reminder, check out this century+ old postcard of an almond grove.
Almond Trees Publisher:  Moshe Ordmann Tel Aviv, ca. 1918Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC #1995.039

IT’S A BIG WORLD - IT MUST BE TU B’SHVAT SOMEWHERE, PT 1

So, Tu B’Shvat, the birthday for the trees (Lorax, eat your heart out!) was just last week.  Hopefully you’re over that blast of amaretto.  But, just in case you need a slight reminder, check out this century+ old postcard of an almond grove.

Almond Trees
Publisher:  Moshe Ordmann
Tel Aviv, ca. 1918
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, ACC #1995.039

Quintan Ana Wikswo reads THE LITTLE KRETSCHMAR

from Tin House magazine (Winter 2012 issue)

January 13, 2012
New York City, NY
Yeshiva University Museum

EMERGING OVERWHELMING BEAUTY - The Golden City/Upper Galilee
Hiking in a valley just bellow Tzfat, the sunlight shimmers the small, mystical city.  Quietude underscores sublimity, broken by stream trickles, bird flutters, and trees rustling in the mountain breeze. Then again, you’d be hard-pressed to find any camels in that part of Israel these days…
Thanks as always 16thstreet!

From the partners’ collections: The Golden City/Upper Galilee
Description: Landscape. Camels lower left, yellow buildings top center, surrounded by green; inscribed reverse: “Ruth Bamberger with Love for Kathrin”Artist: Bamberger, Ruth, 1906-1976Medium: Painting, oil on canvasDate: 1969Persistent URL: digital.cjh.org/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=413013Repository: The Kathryn Yochelson Collection Yeshiva University MuseumAccession number: 2001.396Rights statement: Click here.
Visit our Flickr photostream for more from the partners’ collections.

EMERGING OVERWHELMING BEAUTY - The Golden City/Upper Galilee

Hiking in a valley just bellow Tzfat, the sunlight shimmers the small, mystical city.  Quietude underscores sublimity, broken by stream trickles, bird flutters, and trees rustling in the mountain breeze. Then again, you’d be hard-pressed to find any camels in that part of Israel these days…

Thanks as always 16thstreet!

From the partners’ collections: The Golden City/Upper Galilee

Description: Landscape. Camels lower left, yellow buildings top center, surrounded by green; inscribed reverse: “Ruth Bamberger with Love for Kathrin”
Artist: Bamberger, Ruth, 1906-1976
Medium: Painting, oil on canvas
Date: 1969
Persistent URL: digital.cjh.org/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=413013
Repository: The Kathryn Yochelson Collection Yeshiva University Museum
Accession number: 2001.396
Rights statement: Click here.

Visit our Flickr photostream for more from the partners’ collections.

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