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IN CASE YOU MISS THE HEAT… 
On a hot day like yesterday, you’re probably glad you weren’t cooking over an open hearth.
1987.019 Pot, Eastern Europe, copper, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Alice Bergman

IN CASE YOU MISS THE HEAT… 

On a hot day like yesterday, you’re probably glad you weren’t cooking over an open hearth.

1987.019 Pot, Eastern Europe, copper, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Alice Bergman

QUIZ OF THE DAY:
Which do you think is hotter today – New York City or the Judean Desert?
1986.013 Desert of Judea, Nota Koslowsky (1906-1972), oil on canvas, New York, ca. 1949, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Leon Koslowsky

QUIZ OF THE DAY:

Which do you think is hotter today – New York City or the Judean Desert?

1986.013 Desert of Judea, Nota Koslowsky (1906-1972), oil on canvas, New York, ca. 1949, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Leon Koslowsky

SERIOUSLY, IT’S THIS HOT?
Take a break from the heat - pause and contemplate the cool waters of Lake Tiberias!
1985.038 Lake Tiberias, Mordecai Avniel (1900-1990), oil on canvas, Israel, The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Collection, Yeshiva University Museum

SERIOUSLY, IT’S THIS HOT?

Take a break from the heat - pause and contemplate the cool waters of Lake Tiberias!

1985.038 Lake Tiberias, Mordecai Avniel (1900-1990), oil on canvas, Israel, The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Collection, Yeshiva University Museum

IT’S GETTING HOT OUT THERE, AND IT’S AFTER MEMORIAL DAY!

As heats up, it might be a good time to start wearing white.  But you only have a few months! Even though, wearing white after Labor Day is not necessarily frowned upon anymore, every time I wear white I know that my bubby (grandmother) will say, “No whites after Labor Day!”

(left) White middy blouse with pocket embroidered with three playing cards, black tassel at front neckline, and two buttons.

(right) Uniform. White lab coat with: collar; wrist-length sleeves with button closure; gathered at waist; pocket over right breast inscribed Social Service; 2 pockets in skirt. chest: 17 1/2 in.; waist 12 1/4 in; skirt length waist to hem 24 1/2 in.

Yeshiva University Museum, New York (1999.232) Gift of Lucy Benedikt

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA
Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!
In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  
Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA

Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!

In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  

Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

COUNT AWAY AND READY THAT BONFIRE: LAG B’OMER IS TOMORROW!
Take the time this counting of the omer to check out this calendar.
During the time of the Second Temple, there was a commandment to bring a set amount of barley on the second day of Passover. This set amount of barley was known as an omer. After counting 49 days from the giving of the omer, on the 50th day there was a commandment to bring the first offering of the year to theTemple. Although there is no longer a Temple, Jews are still obliged to count the 49 days.
This commandment to count the omer comes from the Biblical verse: “And from the day on which you bring the sheaf of wave offering – the day after the Sabbath – you shall count off seven weeks” (Lev. 23:15). The process of counting led to the creation of calendars to aid in the process of the omer.
This particular calendar (mid 20th century) is written on parchment and is illuminated with different images. The parchments are housed in a case that was made later. There are two knobs on either side for advancing the parchment. The wooden case is decorated with silver appliqué engraving that have the names of the 12 tribes inscribed along with engravings of animals and an abbreviated name of G-d.  There is little known about this calendar, but the initials N.D. is found on the bottom of the case which could perhaps be the name of the owner.
Omer Calendar, 20th Century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (F341)

COUNT AWAY AND READY THAT BONFIRE: LAG B’OMER IS TOMORROW!

Take the time this counting of the omer to check out this calendar.

During the time of the Second Temple, there was a commandment to bring a set amount of barley on the second day of Passover. This set amount of barley was known as an omer. After counting 49 days from the giving of the omer, on the 50th day there was a commandment to bring the first offering of the year to theTemple. Although there is no longer a Temple, Jews are still obliged to count the 49 days.

This commandment to count the omer comes from the Biblical verse: “And from the day on which you bring the sheaf of wave offering – the day after the Sabbath – you shall count off seven weeks” (Lev. 23:15). The process of counting led to the creation of calendars to aid in the process of the omer.

This particular calendar (mid 20th century) is written on parchment and is illuminated with different images. The parchments are housed in a case that was made later. There are two knobs on either side for advancing the parchment. The wooden case is decorated with silver appliqué engraving that have the names of the 12 tribes inscribed along with engravings of animals and an abbreviated name of G-d.  There is little known about this calendar, but the initials N.D. is found on the bottom of the case which could perhaps be the name of the owner.

Omer Calendar, 20th Century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (F341)

TIME FOR A LITTLE ROMANCE

A little bit of poetry to make your day!

With all of his work in politics and educating youth, finding the time to write romantic poetry is no small feat. This book of poetry, Poems from the German, was compiled in the 20th century. This particular poem was written by Johann Ludwig Uhland and is titled “Castle by the Sea”. Uhland is best known for his romantic poetry, but, he was also an attorney and later struggled to restore parliamentary democracy in Wurttenberg in present-day Germany. He also worked a short while as a professor.  You would think that Uhland would be jaded from his work in politics. This poem, which is a portion of a longer poem, shows a softer side to Uhland.

Books & Manuscripts, 1976. New York. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1998.036).

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!
Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   
Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!

Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   

Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

IN CASE YOU MISS THE HEAT… 
On a hot day like yesterday, you’re probably glad you weren’t cooking over an open hearth.
1987.019 Pot, Eastern Europe, copper, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Alice Bergman

IN CASE YOU MISS THE HEAT… 

On a hot day like yesterday, you’re probably glad you weren’t cooking over an open hearth.

1987.019 Pot, Eastern Europe, copper, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Alice Bergman

QUIZ OF THE DAY:
Which do you think is hotter today – New York City or the Judean Desert?
1986.013 Desert of Judea, Nota Koslowsky (1906-1972), oil on canvas, New York, ca. 1949, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Leon Koslowsky

QUIZ OF THE DAY:

Which do you think is hotter today – New York City or the Judean Desert?

1986.013 Desert of Judea, Nota Koslowsky (1906-1972), oil on canvas, New York, ca. 1949, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Leon Koslowsky

SERIOUSLY, IT’S THIS HOT?
Take a break from the heat - pause and contemplate the cool waters of Lake Tiberias!
1985.038 Lake Tiberias, Mordecai Avniel (1900-1990), oil on canvas, Israel, The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Collection, Yeshiva University Museum

SERIOUSLY, IT’S THIS HOT?

Take a break from the heat - pause and contemplate the cool waters of Lake Tiberias!

1985.038 Lake Tiberias, Mordecai Avniel (1900-1990), oil on canvas, Israel, The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Collection, Yeshiva University Museum

IT’S GETTING HOT OUT THERE, AND IT’S AFTER MEMORIAL DAY!

As heats up, it might be a good time to start wearing white.  But you only have a few months! Even though, wearing white after Labor Day is not necessarily frowned upon anymore, every time I wear white I know that my bubby (grandmother) will say, “No whites after Labor Day!”

(left) White middy blouse with pocket embroidered with three playing cards, black tassel at front neckline, and two buttons.

(right) Uniform. White lab coat with: collar; wrist-length sleeves with button closure; gathered at waist; pocket over right breast inscribed Social Service; 2 pockets in skirt. chest: 17 1/2 in.; waist 12 1/4 in; skirt length waist to hem 24 1/2 in.

Yeshiva University Museum, New York (1999.232) Gift of Lucy Benedikt

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA
Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!
In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  
Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

TZEDAKAH - GIVE TO YOUR MAMA

Since she’s given something to you, try giving something back to your own mom this Mother’s Day, May 13! Make her proud!

In this painting, a mother is shown holding her son as he drops a coin into a tzedakah (charity) box.  The scene highlights one of the many small yet formative moments in childhood, when a mother passses down to her child a life lesson that she herself learned when young—in this case the importance of tzedakah, the religious obligation to give to others.  

Boris Schatz, Jewish Mother, 1929.  Jerusalem, Israel.  Oil on panel; copper frame.  Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.  Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1988.018).

COUNT AWAY AND READY THAT BONFIRE: LAG B’OMER IS TOMORROW!
Take the time this counting of the omer to check out this calendar.
During the time of the Second Temple, there was a commandment to bring a set amount of barley on the second day of Passover. This set amount of barley was known as an omer. After counting 49 days from the giving of the omer, on the 50th day there was a commandment to bring the first offering of the year to theTemple. Although there is no longer a Temple, Jews are still obliged to count the 49 days.
This commandment to count the omer comes from the Biblical verse: “And from the day on which you bring the sheaf of wave offering – the day after the Sabbath – you shall count off seven weeks” (Lev. 23:15). The process of counting led to the creation of calendars to aid in the process of the omer.
This particular calendar (mid 20th century) is written on parchment and is illuminated with different images. The parchments are housed in a case that was made later. There are two knobs on either side for advancing the parchment. The wooden case is decorated with silver appliqué engraving that have the names of the 12 tribes inscribed along with engravings of animals and an abbreviated name of G-d.  There is little known about this calendar, but the initials N.D. is found on the bottom of the case which could perhaps be the name of the owner.
Omer Calendar, 20th Century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (F341)

COUNT AWAY AND READY THAT BONFIRE: LAG B’OMER IS TOMORROW!

Take the time this counting of the omer to check out this calendar.

During the time of the Second Temple, there was a commandment to bring a set amount of barley on the second day of Passover. This set amount of barley was known as an omer. After counting 49 days from the giving of the omer, on the 50th day there was a commandment to bring the first offering of the year to theTemple. Although there is no longer a Temple, Jews are still obliged to count the 49 days.

This commandment to count the omer comes from the Biblical verse: “And from the day on which you bring the sheaf of wave offering – the day after the Sabbath – you shall count off seven weeks” (Lev. 23:15). The process of counting led to the creation of calendars to aid in the process of the omer.

This particular calendar (mid 20th century) is written on parchment and is illuminated with different images. The parchments are housed in a case that was made later. There are two knobs on either side for advancing the parchment. The wooden case is decorated with silver appliqué engraving that have the names of the 12 tribes inscribed along with engravings of animals and an abbreviated name of G-d.  There is little known about this calendar, but the initials N.D. is found on the bottom of the case which could perhaps be the name of the owner.

Omer Calendar, 20th Century. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (F341)

TIME FOR A LITTLE ROMANCE

A little bit of poetry to make your day!

With all of his work in politics and educating youth, finding the time to write romantic poetry is no small feat. This book of poetry, Poems from the German, was compiled in the 20th century. This particular poem was written by Johann Ludwig Uhland and is titled “Castle by the Sea”. Uhland is best known for his romantic poetry, but, he was also an attorney and later struggled to restore parliamentary democracy in Wurttenberg in present-day Germany. He also worked a short while as a professor.  You would think that Uhland would be jaded from his work in politics. This poem, which is a portion of a longer poem, shows a softer side to Uhland.

Books & Manuscripts, 1976. New York. Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1998.036).

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!
Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   
Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

HAPPY YOM HA’ATZMAUT!  ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY!

Not that it’s getting ready to retire, but Israel is turning 64, oh, TOMORROW! This image of a postcard from Israel’s third birthday in 1951 seems like it comes from the distant past, what with the image of a Roman column.   

Postcard celebrating Israeli Independence Day 1951, designed by R. Siedner, Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1997.126), gift of Beverly Fettman

About:

YU Museum creates new ways to experience and interpret Jewish art and history. It is a source for new ideas and perspectives on historic events and cultural phenomena effecting everyone.

Visit YU Museum’s exhibitions and programs! They open the eyes of audiences to new perspectives on Jewish culture, historic events and cultural phenomena. They reveal the vitality and resonance of present-day art on Jewish themes, and reflect and re-interpret millennia of Jewish experiences for the present. Visit: @15 w16th st, NYC

Visit YU Museum @ www.YUMuseum.org

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